IN THE NEWS

Skf

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
November 29, 1989 | The Inquirer Staff
SKF Bearing Industries Co., the King of Prussia ball-bearing manufacturer, yesterday let its $72-a-share offer to buy the stock of McGill Manufacturing Co. expire. Raymond B. Langton, president of SKF Bearing, said the company still believed that "the combination of SKF and McGill would have significant benefits" for McGill shareholders and employees but that it ended its tender offer because of McGill's refusal to discuss a combination. SKF said it was leaving open all options, including another purchase offer.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1987 | By ROBIN PALLEY, Daily News Staff Writer
Smith Kline & French Laboratories has agreed to become the exclusive U.S. distributor of a Swedish drug that has the potential to save thousands of heart attack victims. The drug, KabiKinase, is manufactured in Sweden by KabiVitrum AB of Stockholm - one of two world producers of the drug streptokinase, said Jeremy Heymsfeld, SmithKline Beckman spokesman. KabiVitrum is the smaller of the two producers, said Alan Wachter of Smith Kline & French Labs. Terms of the accord were not released, although executives of both firms may say more when they meet with reporters this morning in New York.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the curved pedestrian bridge Towamencin Township built over the crossroads village of Kulpsville, you can see the next suburban boomtown rising. It's taken long enough, says Robert Nicoletti, 82, who bought ground there in 1958. From the bridge, against a backdrop of the behind-schedule Pennsylvania Turnpike widening at the nearby Lansdale exit, you can watch crews build the four-story Bridgeview apartment complex, which will start renting next month; the thick concrete core of a six-story Courtyard by Marriott hotel, due in the fall;, and the Culinary Arts Institute of Montgomery County Community College, which will enroll its first students in the spring.
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank W. Wellons, 93, an engineering executive and former resident of the Philadelphia suburbs, died Friday, March 15, of pneumonia at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, Wash. Mr. Wellons lived in Devon and West Chester for 72 years before moving to Seattle in January to be near his daughter, Amy. He was recognized as an expert in roller bearings and was instrumental in developing a version of the buffering mechanisms that were used in aircraft turbine power plants. He also helped develop international engineering standards for roller bearings, his family said.
NEWS
January 9, 1986 | By JUAN GONZALEZ, Daily News Staff Writer
A bill that would pave the way for St. Christopher's Hospital for Children to begin construction of a new $65 million complex was approved by a City Council committee yesterday. The rezoning ordinance, expected to pass the full Council by next week, assures that the hospital will remain in the city and close to the North Philadelphia neighborhood it has served since 1876. For several years, residents of eastern North Philadelphia, one of the city's poorest sections, have been pressuring the hospital board to keep the 146-bed facility, at Lehigh Avenue and 4th Street, from moving to the suburbs.
NEWS
August 14, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
Philip Charles Cooke, 86, a retired management consultant, died Aug. 5 at Bryn Mawr Hospital after a short illness. He was a resident of Bryn Mawr for five years and previously was a resident of Media for 15 years. Mr. Cooke was born in Kalamazoo, Mich., and attended Central High School there. In 1924, he graduated from the University of Michigan with a degree in civil engineering. Upon graduation, he worked as a consultant for the Upjohn Co. of Michigan. Mr. Cooke became a management consultant for Worden & Risberg of Philadelphia in 1953.
NEWS
December 16, 1987 | By FRANK DOUGHERTY, Daily News Staff Writer
Jesse Lawrence Marshall, a longtime Democratic committeeman, died Saturday at Graduate Hospital. He was 42 and lived in South Philadelphia. "Jesse was a loving person, and the love came back to him in many ways," recalled his mother, Marion Marshall. "His greatest joy in life was taking neighborhood youngsters on picnics, trips into the country and excursions to the Philadelphia Zoo. " When not out on day trips, Marshall could be found sitting on his front steps, holding court with his neighbors, answering questions and dispensing advice.
NEWS
August 21, 1997 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Lloyd William Murphy, builder of the giant walk-through heart at the Franklin Institute Science Museum, died of pneumonia Tuesday. He was 85 and lived in Cherry Hill. Murphy built the the heart - 220 times the size of an actual heart - in 1953 as a temporary exhibit. Originally constructed from wood, plaster and display board, it took months to complete and was designed under the auspices of University of Pennsylvania cardiologist Mildred Pfeifer. Neither Murphy nor Franklin Institute officials had any idea when it first opened how popular the exhibit would instantly become.
NEWS
September 28, 1989 | By Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
John William Quigley Jr., a newspaper truck driver who opened his own newspaper stand when he was 8 years old, died Tuesday. He was 68 and a longtime Mayfair resident. "My father had his own stand on the southeast corner of Broad Street and Susquehanna Avenue. Opened it in 1929, he did," said his son, John Quigley III. The so-called "competition" across the street - the stand operated on the northwest corner - belonged to his father, patriarch John Quigley. After all the papers were sold, little Jack Quigley would put his change in a cloth sack and board a southbound train to the Inquirer building at 400 N. Broad St. Upon his arrival, he would settle the Quigley family account, then order newspapers for the following day. The Quigley family lived on Carlisle Street, around the corner from the newsstand, and it was the single penny earned on the sale of each Inquirer, Evening Bulletin, Daily News and Record that kept the roof on the Carlisle house all through the Great Depression.
NEWS
June 6, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia Housing Authority police officer said yesterday that a shot from a gunman's rifle struck him so hard inside a bulletproof-glass enclosed security booth at a Germantown apartment complex that "it knocked me off my feet. " Testifying in the trial of Zahir Boddy-Johnson, Officer Craig Kelley said he was on duty alone when he heard a knock at the door of a security booth at the entrance of the Queen Lane Apartments, and that when he opened the door he was "staring down the muzzle" of a semiautomatic rifle about six feet away.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 27, 2013 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Frank W. Wellons, 93, an engineering executive and former resident of the Philadelphia suburbs, died Friday, March 15, of pneumonia at Harborview Hospital in Seattle, Wash. Mr. Wellons lived in Devon and West Chester for 72 years before moving to Seattle in January to be near his daughter, Amy. He was recognized as an expert in roller bearings and was instrumental in developing a version of the buffering mechanisms that were used in aircraft turbine power plants. He also helped develop international engineering standards for roller bearings, his family said.
NEWS
March 12, 2013 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
From the curved pedestrian bridge Towamencin Township built over the crossroads village of Kulpsville, you can see the next suburban boomtown rising. It's taken long enough, says Robert Nicoletti, 82, who bought ground there in 1958. From the bridge, against a backdrop of the behind-schedule Pennsylvania Turnpike widening at the nearby Lansdale exit, you can watch crews build the four-story Bridgeview apartment complex, which will start renting next month; the thick concrete core of a six-story Courtyard by Marriott hotel, due in the fall;, and the Culinary Arts Institute of Montgomery County Community College, which will enroll its first students in the spring.
NEWS
October 15, 2010
SKF USA has earned platinum LEED certification in the category of commercial interiors for its U.S. headquarters in Lansdale. The bearings manufacturer recently completed a $23 million redevelopment of the facility, including green features such as an extensive geothermal heating/heating-ventilation-air conditioning system, and the integration of natural and high-efficiency lighting, as well as refurbished furniture. Platinum is the highest classification under the U.S. Green Building Council's LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design)
NEWS
June 6, 2009 | By Vernon Clark INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia Housing Authority police officer said yesterday that a shot from a gunman's rifle struck him so hard inside a bulletproof-glass enclosed security booth at a Germantown apartment complex that "it knocked me off my feet. " Testifying in the trial of Zahir Boddy-Johnson, Officer Craig Kelley said he was on duty alone when he heard a knock at the door of a security booth at the entrance of the Queen Lane Apartments, and that when he opened the door he was "staring down the muzzle" of a semiautomatic rifle about six feet away.
NEWS
August 21, 1997 | by Jim Nicholson, Daily News Staff Writer
Lloyd William Murphy, builder of the giant walk-through heart at the Franklin Institute Science Museum, died of pneumonia Tuesday. He was 85 and lived in Cherry Hill. Murphy built the the heart - 220 times the size of an actual heart - in 1953 as a temporary exhibit. Originally constructed from wood, plaster and display board, it took months to complete and was designed under the auspices of University of Pennsylvania cardiologist Mildred Pfeifer. Neither Murphy nor Franklin Institute officials had any idea when it first opened how popular the exhibit would instantly become.
NEWS
March 2, 1997 | By Joseph S. Kennedy, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
You might think of baseball, especially local baseball, as a men's game. But history would prove you wrong. In these parts, women actively played the game from the mid-19th century until the mid-20th century. Ruth Stokes, 71, of Kulpsville, played for the Norristown Nifties, organized by her husband, Harry, in 1950. "Harry, who had been active in coaching girls' softball for a number of years, received a call from one of the commissioners of the newly formed Eastern Girls Baseball Conference, asking him to form a girls' hardball team," Stokes said.
NEWS
January 8, 1995 | By Susan Warner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Amtrak train to New York rounds the Philadelphia Zoo, spans the Schuylkill and gathers speed as it enters the dead zone. Carcasses of hulking factories loom on each side of the tracks, their rotten roofs caved in on heaps of crumbling red brick and shattered glass. Many are singed by flames. Towering over the moonscape, smokestacks bear a few faded, ghostly corporate names. "All cities have a section like that, but I would have to say, offhand, that part of Philadelphia is the worst," said Jack Swanson, who rode 100,000 miles on nearly every route of the North American railways editing the book, Rail Ventures.
NEWS
June 16, 1993 | by Frank Dougherty, Daily News Staff Writer
Irene Burgess Beard, an accomplished pianist who also was a virtuoso on the church organ, died Thursday. She lived in West Philadelphia. Her age was not disclosed. Beard arrived in Philadelphia from Savannah, Ga., in the 1940s. Dwight Smalls, her great-nephew, remembers Irene Beard as an industrious women who loved flowers and dressed in the latest fashion. "She was always hip for her age, and had great personal style. When she was younger, she reminded folks of movie star Joan Crawford," said Smalls.
NEWS
January 7, 1993 | by Dave Bittan, Daily News Staff Writer
Fishtown's Winnie Spinks has five sons and 20 grandchildren, but most of her concern is for two sons who are career soldiers. She worried about their safety while they were fighting in the Persian Gulf. Both Army sergeants came through without a scratch. Now, she fears that one - or both - might be sent to Somalia if more American troops are dispatched to that troubled African nation. And, if not there, she fears they could wind up in Bosnia if we get involved in the Balkan conflict.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1991 | By Valerie Reitman, Inquirer Staff Writer
After three-quarters of a century of making ball and roller bearings in Philadelphia, SKF AB said yesterday that it would close its last factory in the city by the end of the year and lay off about 360 workers. SKF, based in Sweden, once was one of Philadelphia's larger employers, with more than 4,000 employees making bearings at two factories, the Tulip Street plant that will be closed and an already closed plant at Front and Erie Streets. SKF's U.S. headquarters in King of Prussia, which employs about 325 people, will not be affected, officials said.
1 | 2 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|