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SPORTS
January 20, 2004 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Two-sport star Jeremy Bloom intends to play football next fall - and to accept skiing endorsements in defiance of the NCAA. Bloom said yesterday that his decision is intended to force the NCAA's hand, requiring the organization to either change its position or prevent him from playing football. The NCAA has ruled that Bloom cannot accept skiing endorsements and play football. Bloom maintains that such money is necessary to fund his freestyle skiing career. For the last two seasons, Bloom has been a wide receiver and kick returner at Colorado while also competing in moguls skiing on the World Cup circuit - at his own expense.
SPORTS
April 27, 2006 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Whether it's skiing fast or running against hungry opponents who are covering punts, Jeremy Bloom sees plenty of similarities. Bloom has a unique perspective on both hazardous occupations as the only two-time Olympic skier expected to be selected in this weekend's NFL draft, possibly on the first day. Bloom, 24, hasn't played football since the 2003 season, when he completed his sophomore season as a receiver and returner at the University of...
SPORTS
January 28, 2005 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Jeremy Bloom, the former University of Colorado receiver who was forced to give up football to concentrate on skiing and the 2006 Turin Olympics, led a U.S. sweep in men's moguls yesterday with his first freestyle World Cup victory of the season. Bloom lost an NCAA appeal to allow him to continue to play college football while receiving endorsements for his skiing. Bloom hasn't forgotten football - his skiing helmet is painted gold with the CU buffalo emblem on the sides and his former No. 15. Bloom overtook qualifying leader Toby Dawson with a faster and more difficult final run, completing a 720-degree turn off both jumps on the Champion course at Deer Valley in Park City, Utah, and finished with a score of 27.05.
SPORTS
February 16, 1992 | By Gary Miles, INQUIRER OLYMPICS BUREAU
It was strangely quiet at the finish line when Hilary Lindh came roaring down the mountainside and finally slid to a halt. Twenty-thousand mouths hung open. People gaped at the scoreboard. The whole mountain just . . . stopped. Lindh, a 22-year-old native of Juneau, Alaska, had just slipped down Roc de Fer, one of the world's most challenging ski courses, as smooth as water over glass. Because of the silence, Lindh thought she had run poorly. She mistook disbelief for disappointment.
NEWS
April 20, 1986 | By Carole Fleck, Special to The Inquirer
Frythjoff "Fritz" Koenig had been a picture of health until he suffered a heart attack eight years ago, at age 72. After that event devastated his family, Koenig's physician wasn't going to take any chances. "No more skiing," Koenig recalled his doctor insisting that August. But as soon as summer turned to fall, Koenig raced to the Pocono Mountains to do what has kept him going since he was 5. "I have loved skiing from the beginning," Koenig said during an interview at his home in Lansdowne, where gigantic photographs of him on skis grace the walls.
NEWS
March 2, 1998 | By Patricia Smith, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Michael Woods snapped on his skis, planted his poles firmly in the snow, and swiveled his hips like a pro. Hey, how hard could this skiing thing be? Looked easy enough when the Olympics were on TV last month. "I bet I'm not going to fall the whole day," the 10-year-old bragged to his friends. Yeah, right. Within minutes, Woods' skis slid out from under him, his legs got tangled up, he tumbled into his friends standing shakily nearby, and landed on the snow in a heap of bodies and laughter.
NEWS
February 1, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Whitman fractured two bones in a lower leg yesterday after falling hard on the ski slopes in Davos, Switzerland, where she was skiing after several days of meetings at the annual World Economic Forum. The governor, 52, underwent surgery about 3 p.m. (9 a.m. Philadelphia time) at Spital Davos Hospital, where doctors inserted a strip of metal into her leg to brace the bones, said her spokesman, Peter McDonough, who did not know which leg was broken. No cast will be required, and Whitman was expected to recover fully in a couple of months, he said.
NEWS
February 14, 1994 | By Mike Biglin, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
To commemorate the Olympic Games, the Keystone State Games decided to run its winter competition two weeks earlier than usual, starting it Thursday to coincide with this weekend's start of the Winter Games in Lillehammer, Norway. No doubt the organizers of the Keystone Games want to emulate the Olympic ideals of fraternity and sportsmanship. Well, they didn't have too far to look to find them amongst their competitors. Two families from Delaware County, the Woodys and the Bedwells, have competed in the Keystone Games together for the last three years, using the event for friendly competition and a chance to gain more memories in a friendship that has lasted almost a decade.
NEWS
February 22, 1993 | By Don Beideman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Thirteen-year-old Matthew Hirsch of Phoenixville won a gold medal in skating, and two others from Chester County took the gold in skiing events at the Keystone State Games. Hirsch took first place Saturday in the beginner boys' freestyle event at the Ice-A-Rama in Wilkes-Barre, while several others from Chester placed in skating events. The four days of skating and skiing events continued through yesterday. Laura Kirk, a resident of Chadds Ford and eighth-grade student at the Charles Patton Middle School, finished second in the solo dance tango and took fourth in the intermediate ladies' freeskating.
NEWS
December 5, 1993 | By Peter Shelton, FOR THE INQUIRER
Here in Norway, skiing and history are inextricably linked. Imagine if Paul Revere had ridden through the night on a pair of waxed hickory boards. Then consider that the Norwegians' history goes back 20 times further than ours. So it should come as no surprise that they have woven their skiing stories and skiing art into the very fabric of the Winter Olympics, which will run from Feb. 12 to 27. You can see it and taste it - and even ski it - all around this host city, a small (population 23,000)
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TRAVEL
December 1, 2014 | By Anne Z. Cooke, For The Inquirer
WHISTLER, British Columbia - Never averse to a tip from an expert, I like to think of it as the law of inverse timing, one of those lightbulb moments that can make your day. "In the early season start skiing late, and the late season, start early," said John, the mountain host and our guide for the morning, as we assembled at the base chairlift at Whistler Ski Resort. "You'll ski better and feel better if you set your clock to match the calendar. " What he means is that if you're skiing in December or January, when the days are shortest and coldest, stay in bed longer, hit the slopes after the sun has softened the icy patches, and ski until the ski lifts close.
NEWS
November 9, 2014 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, For The Inquirer
STEAMBOAT SPRINGS, Colo. - For the last few years, ski resorts in cowboy country - and the skiers who love them - have been riding a bucking bronc. Huge dumps of snow blanketed slopes in the up years; in down years, late snow and warmer days cast a pall over the industry. At Steamboat Resort, in western Colorado, hard-core skiers were over the moon in 2008 when monster storms dropped 433 inches of snow on the slopes. But disbelief followed when the next winter brought fewer, weaker storms and half as much snow.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 8, 2014 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
"FORCE Majeure" is a National Lampoon vacation movie as it might have been directed by Alfred Hitchcock or Roman Polanski. This Cannes award winner is the funny/awful story of a Swiss family on a ski getaway, where mom (Clara Wettergren) and dad (Johannes Kuhnke) manage the daily chaos of boots and mittens and poles, and manage to have a bit of fun themselves. They pause for a slopeside lunch at an outdoor café with a spectacular view of the mountain. As they dine, the snow patrol initiates a small explosion next to an overhang of snow, causing a controlled avalanche.
SPORTS
February 11, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
KRASNAYA POLYANA, Russia - You see an Olympic career dawn with the brightness Sage Kotsenburg displayed on Saturday, and you forget how dark the dusk can be. Hannah Kearney knows now. For the veteran freestyle skier, it ended with tears and sleeplessness; with consoling phone calls and ugly Internet messages; with disappointment, frustration, and, finally, hope for a future she can't quite imagine yet. Kearney, favored to win a second straight...
SPORTS
February 11, 2014 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
AUSTRIA'S DANIELA Iraschko-Stolz wants to focus on the women's normal hill ski-jumping event that starts tomorrow. But people keep asking her questions about being gay in a country that doesn't tolerate homosexuality. Yesterday, she tried to put the issue to rest. The 30-year-old Iraschko-Stolz, who married her partner, Isabel Stolz, last year, was asked if she was treated differently in Sochi. "No, on the contrary, I think everything is being blown up bigger than it is," she told reporters.
SPORTS
February 9, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
SOCHI - Women had been ski-jumping for decades when Jessica Jerome took her first flying leap at age 7. The Utah resident knew she liked it right away, nearly as quickly as her parents knew they did not. "My dad kept thinking of the agony of defeat [footage that shows a ski-jumper wiping out] from the Wide World of Sports," she said. But she did not give up and eventually, when her parents learned that neither their daughter nor any other young girl could grow up to be an Olympian jumper, their distaste became outrage.
NEWS
February 6, 2014 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's more than their unusual Black Sea locale that, for American TV viewers at least, will lend an exotic flavor to these 2014 Winter Olympics. Ninety years after 304 mostly aristocratic, mostly male amateurs gathered for the first Winter Games, Sochi's schedule will showcase several new daredevil sports, more team events, and a superstar roster dominated by females. With diminished women's figure-skating hopes and a men's hockey team so far absent from the gold-medal conversation, the United States will rely on much-improved bobsled and Alpine skiing teams as it seeks a second straight medal-count victory.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2014 | By Eric Vohr, For The Inquirer
ST. ANTON, Austria - In a remote alpine valley in western Austria, a local cheese farmer named Hannes Schneider opened a ski school in the 1920s. Soon people all over the world were learning his "Arlberg" technique, and modern skiing, as we know it, was born. The Arlberg region, named after the mountain range that stretches between Vorarlberg and Tyrol in Austria, is more than just a ski destination, it's a pilgrimage to a holy land. This terrain is some of the most challenging in the world for skiing.
NEWS
December 24, 2013 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
FROM THE white sands of Fiji to the cliffs of the Swiss Alps, Aleta Hall was at home. Or maybe on a cruise ship to the Caribbean, chilling out on the deck and maybe dreaming of the treacherous slopes she loved to try. Aleta actually had her 15 minutes of fame in the mid-'90s when she appeared in a Verizon TV commercial, extolling the virtues of the service. "She did very well," said her sister Karen W. Eskridge. "She looked good. " Aleta C. Hall, longtime employee of the old Bell Telephone Co. (later taken over by Verizon)
TRAVEL
November 18, 2013 | By Anne Z. Cooke and Steve Haggerty, For The Inquirer
PARK CITY, Utah - Hindsight is always 20/20, especially when you're talking about teaching kids to ski. Like a lot of parents who love to ski, I figured I could teach my children myself. And I tried. But looking back now, I wish I'd put them in group lessons much sooner, when they were 6 or 7, blank slates waiting to be written on. It took me a while to realize that when your kids are skiing the slopes with an enthusiastic young instructor - slip-sliding through the trees, puffing fresh air, whooping and hollering and pretending small bumps are Olympic obstacles - they'll learn in a hurry, and they'll love it, too. As in any sport, an inspiring, encouraging coach and a week on the slopes teamed up with other kids is a winning combination.
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