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Skin Cancer

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NEWS
June 16, 1996 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Ah, summertime! Picnics . . . beaches . . . the sun toasting your skin. Alas, those glorious sunbeams are potential killers. For years, doctors have warned that ultraviolet rays cause more cancers than nicotine, pesticides, automotive fumes or any other carcinogen. About 850,000 new cases of skin cancer - about 9,000 of them fatal - are expected this year in the United States alone. Advances in molecular science are revealing how those invisible waves of solar energy - no more than 10-billionths of an inch from crest to crest - create such havoc.
NEWS
May 1, 1995 | by Mary Flannery, Daily News Staff Writer
The Great American Smoke-Out encourages cigarette smokers to kick the habit - at least for one day each year in November. Now dermatologists are hoping that Melanoma Monday will encourage Americans to develop a lifelong habit of checking their bodies periodically for the signs of skin cancer, especially the virulent form called melanoma. The American Academy of Dermatology designated the first Monday in May - that's today - as Melanoma Monday. But the personal skin-check should occur periodically throughout the year.
NEWS
April 24, 1988 | By Marla Weinstein, Special to The Inquirer
With the summer months creeping up and the sun shining longer each day, the scene is set for the dermatologists' nightmare: skin cancer. Memorial Hospital of Burlington County is meeting the danger head-on. From 3 to 5 p.m. Friday, free skin cancer screenings will be available to the public and will be conducted by staff dermatologist David High. Skin cancer is on the rise and, according to hospital officials, getting tan may have greater consequences than one thinks. Part of the danger with skin cancer is that the effects do not surface until years after the original damage is done, High said.
NEWS
September 25, 1991 | By Robert Zausner, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
Gov. Casey, dogged by health problems since taking office in 1987, had a minor skin cancer removed from his chest two weeks ago and will undergo an additional precautionary procedure tomorrow, his office said yesterday. Casey's doctor said that the basal cell cancer, which was less than a quarter-inch long and was the same type of cancer removed from President Reagan's nose in 1985, posed no further health risk to the governor. "These really are a dime a dozen," said Donald Lookingbill, chief of dermatology at Hershey Medical Center, "And they're not a threat to the patient.
NEWS
June 14, 1996 | By Robert S. Boyd, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
Genes responsible for the most common type of cancer in humans have been found, and the discovery could lead to development of a treatment other than surgery or radiation, two international teams of scientists reported. When the gene is damaged by ultraviolet radiation from the sun, it can produce a relatively harmless kind of skin tumor, known as basal cell carcinoma, that afflicts about 750,000 people in the United States each year. Pale-skinned, middle-aged and older people of Northern European ancestry are the most susceptible to these growths, which do not spread to other parts of the body and, if caught in time, are easily removed.
NEWS
July 14, 1987 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
American health officials are launching a nationwide public-education campaign this summer to combat what they say are alarming and unexpectedly rapid increases in the incidence of skin cancer. Health experts are particularly concerned about the skyrocketing rate of malignant melanoma, a deadly form of skin cancer, which has increased 83 percent since 1980. While nobody knows for sure why the rate has soared in recent years, many think that changing American lifestyles that expose more people to the sun are a major factor.
NEWS
June 21, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
We can blame the French for popularizing the consumption of snails, harboring convicted Philadelphia murderer Ira Einhorn - and increasing the incidence of skin cancer. It was Coco Chanel, the famous French fashion designer, who is credited with popularizing the suntan after being spotted in Cannes in the 1920s, deeply bronzed after a yachting trip from Paris. Before that, it was perfectly acceptable, even preferable, to walk around with a pale complexion. "Until Coco Chanel made the suntan popular, it was considered a sign that you were a working-class laborer who toiled outside in the fields.
NEWS
April 12, 1994 | By Jim Detjen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A vaccine tested on patients with advanced melanoma has been found to be 70 percent effective in preventing the recurrence of their deadly skin cancer, Philadelphia scientists reported yesterday. The vaccine was made from the patients' own tumors and is the first to show such a high level of success in halting the spread of the disease, the scientists said. "The same approach could be used to develop vaccines against breast, colon and other forms of cancer," said David Berd, a professor of medicine at Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, who announced the findings at the annual meeting of the American Association of Cancer Research in San Francisco.
NEWS
May 25, 1989 | By Jim Detjen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Findings by a team of 10 scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and two other institutions could provide clues to the causes of melanoma and eventually lead to diagnostic tests and treatments for this deadly form of skin cancer. In an article in today's issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, the scientists from Penn, the National Cancer Institute and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology announced that they had located the gene that causes a deadly form of melanoma on a human chromosome.
SPORTS
July 25, 2010
Kaye Cowher , 54, the wife of former Pittsburgh Steelers coach Bill Cowher and a former basketball player at North Carolina State and in the now-defunct Women's Professional Basketball League, died Friday of skin cancer in her native North Carolina. The Cowhers met at North Carolina State, where Bill played linebacker before beginning an NFL career. They married in 1981, after the former Kaye Young played alongside twin sister Faye in college and during a three-season pro career.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 17, 2015 | By David Sell, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Philadelphia-based American Association for Cancer Research trumpeted progress on the disease in a report released Wednesday, noting that nine new cancer drugs were approved by the Food and Drug Administration in the 12 months ending July 31. In that period, one new cancer vaccine and one new cancer screening test were also approved. Six other cancer drugs and one imaging agent were deemed worthy of use in patients with forms of cancer beyond the originally approved use. "Since I started working in the field of oncology about three decades ago, there has been a sea change in our basic understanding of what cancer is," José Baselga, AACR president, said in the report.
NEWS
August 26, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
Anyone who knows how rough cancer treatment can be may wonder about former President Jimmy Carter's decision to fight his melanoma with drugs and radiation - at 90. At his age, couldn't the treatment be worse than the cancer? Cancer experts say new ways of combating cancer - plus new ways of thinking about aging - are changing the equation when doctors evaluate the elderly for treatment. "Aging is an incredibly heterogeneous process," said Andrew Chapman, an oncologist at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital who runs a program that focuses on the special needs of geriatric cancer patients.
NEWS
May 4, 2015 | By Stacey Burling, Inquirer Staff Writer
The guests of honor at the St. Christopher's Hospital for Children "prom" hit the red carpet on Saturday well after the paparazzi - staff, family members, and a few professional photographers - had staked out key vantage points along the red velvet ropes. Finally, 55 children with cancer strode out or rolled in as their names were announced one by one. The girls wore frilly, shiny dresses. Most of the boys were in black suits. Little Liam, who had just turned 1, went first, in his father's arms.
NEWS
January 18, 2015 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
You may have seen it performed in real time on ABC's Good Morning America . Or maybe you caught actor Hugh Jackman telling David Letterman about having it. Or you may be among the legions of people who have personally undergone it. It is Mohs micrographic surgery, the preferred treatment for the two most common types of skin cancer: basal cell and squamous cell. Although rarely life-threatening, these tumors can become disfiguring without timely removal, and they are being diagnosed at the staggering clip of more than four million a year.
SPORTS
March 18, 2014 | BY RYAN LAWRENCE, Daily News Staff Writer rlawrence@phillynews.com
CLEARWATER, Fla. - After finding a seat on top of a picnic table outside the Phillies clubhouse at Bright House Field yesterday morning, Hall of Famer Mike Schmidt quickly repositioned himself. He said something about trying to avoid the sun. In the 20 minutes that followed, Schmidt explained why he was wary of the sun and why he was unable to perform his regular duties as an on-field guest instructor this spring training, too. Schmidt, 64, was diagnosed with Stage 3 melanoma in August and underwent two surgeries, chemotherapy and radiation treatments in the months that followed.
NEWS
November 24, 2013 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Demi goes for respectability It's time we respected youngster Demi Lovato , 21, as a serious artist and a woman of conscience. "I think no matter what way you say it, you're gonna be in the public eye and people are gonna look up to you. I just decided that I turned 21, I gotta be an adult, I've gotta act like one and here I am," Demi tells Hollyscoop. And she tells Entertainment Weekly she's tired of singers who write songs just for their shock value. "You're more respected as an artist" if you stay away from that material, she says.
NEWS
August 19, 2013 | By Marie McCullough, Inquirer Staff Writer
The handler led McBaine on a leash to the veterinarian, who extended her hand to show him a vial. "Seek!" the trainer ordered. If a dog is capable of thinking "whatever," then that's what the 9-month-old springer spaniel must have thought as he sniffed the bottle-cap-size vial and its contents. As soon as he did, trainer Annemarie DeAngelo heaped praise and gave him a chew toy for a brief game of tug-of-war. Within minutes on this recent morning at the University of Pennsylvania's Working Dog Center, McBaine knew the drill: Sniff the vial, sit, get rewarded.
NEWS
July 9, 2013
Cynthia Lufkin, 51, whose marriage to a cofounder of Wall Street firm Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette created a New York power couple in social and philanthropic circles, died Wednesday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan of complications from breast and lung cancer. Her home was in Washington, Conn., north of New York City. After being diagnosed with breast cancer in 2005 while pregnant with her second child, Ms. Lufkin focused her philanthropic work on the disease. With a degree in biochemistry, she was particularly interested in how healthy living could bolster the outlook for cancer patients, and her work led to the opening of the Cynthia Lufkin Fitness & Seminar Room at Sloan- Kettering's Evelyn H. Lauder Breast Center.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer GreenSpace Columnist
Joseph Sobanko's patients often ask him which sunscreen is best. That's especially true this time of year, when people are going outside and the sun's rays are at their brightest - and most damaging. Whether the patient is blond or dark, freckled or fair, the Penn Medicine skin-cancer specialist has the same answer: Whichever sunscreen you'll actually use. Far too few of us do, he says. About one in five Americans will develop skin cancer - the most common kind of cancer - in their lifetimes.
NEWS
May 21, 2013 | By Erin McCarthy, For The Inquirer
Councilman William Greenlee hopes not to get burnt Thursday when his indoor-tanning bill comes up for a vote. Citing what he called "a preponderance of evidence" that indoor tanning greatly raises one's risk of developing skin cancer, Greenlee has introduced a bill that would restrict minors from using indoor-tanning facilities in Philadelphia without parental permission. The measure would also prohibit those younger than 14 from using commercial tanning beds and other ultraviolet-emitting equipment without a doctor's permission.
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