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Skin Disease

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NEWS
August 30, 2010
Geneticist Richard Lifton had been more focused on heart than skin disease, but when a former postdoc dermatologist returned to describe a baffling case, the head of Yale's genetics department was intrigued. The patient's skin was a hodgepodge of red and white patches, said Lifton. The diagnosis was a rare genetic disease called "ichthyosis en confetti," named after the diseased skin's scaly look. The red patches were inflamed skin typical of the condition, but the white patches were a mystery to Lifton and his former postdoc.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
"Your looks are laughable," goes the old standard "My Funny Valentine," a theme song of sorts for the made-for-TV weeper, For Hope. The film is at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channel 6. After the first 10 or 15 minutes, there's very little that's laughable about For Hope, even though it's executive-produced by one of America's most recognizable funnymen, Abington's own Bob Saget. For Hope is the nonstop story of a funny, pretty and dynamic woman's agonizing slide toward death. Starring Dana Delany from China Beach as Hope, it's based on the life of Saget's sister Gay, who was diagnosed with scleroderma in early 1992, and who died April 10, 1994, at 47. She had lived in Newtown and taught at Council Rock Middle School.
NEWS
April 23, 1993 | By Josh Zimmer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Russel Aitkens looked wondrously at his fingers, then wiggled them. Months ago, he could barely cup his hand. "By a miracle and the grace of God, things have turned around," Aitkens said, shaking his downturned head as though it doesn't all make sense. "I'm going to start a new life all over again. " There was a point about two years ago when Aitkens, an 18-year veteran of the Delran Police Department, nearly died of kidney failure as a result of scleroderma, a rare skin disease.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | For The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
Vitiligo, a skin disease, is the subject of a science project completed by Bianca Vulcu, 12, for the Abington Junior High School science fair. Bianca is a student in seventh grade at the school.
SPORTS
February 3, 2009 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a letter to the District 1 wrestling steering committee yesterday, Ches-Mont League officials said they were suspending intra-league competition because of an outbreak of herpes gladiatorum, or mat herpes, at several league schools. The league said it was following the National Federation of High School's sports medicine advisory committee's guidelines for dealing with the skin disease. "This was done out of an abundance of caution for all of our league wrestlers," said Paul Hurley, league president and principal at Downingtown East.
SPORTS
February 12, 2012
Camden Catholic's Jeff Miller hurried to an 11-second pin at 285 pounds, highlighting the Irish's 40-30 upset at Bishop Ahr in the NJSIAA South Jersey Non-Public B wrestling championship on Friday night. Miller stopped Ahr's Everett Oxner for one of the second-seeded Irish's three pins against the top-seeded Trojans. Tyler McBride added a fall at 106 pounds and Carmen Iossa scored a pin at 182. Also for the defending champion Irish, who won five straight weights from Joe Flemming's major decision at 170 to Miller's pin at 285, Chad Walsh (138 pounds)
NEWS
June 20, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Manute Bol, 47, a giant among even NBA stars and a towering symbol of hope in his native Sudan, died Saturday morning. The former 76ers center died at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, where he was being treated for acute kidney failure and a skin disease, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Mr. Bol, who at 7-foot-7 could be an intimidating defensive presence on the court, was also known for his humanitarian efforts in Sudan. He founded Sudan Sunrise, a group based in Lenexa, Kan., working to end oppression in Sudan.
LIVING
June 13, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officially, Maria Isabel Limardo of Venezuela is studying the genetics of skin disease at Thomas Jefferson University. But the South American is also getting a lesson in world culture in the dermatology laboratory at Jefferson Medical College, where she shares workspace, scientific equipment and recipes with researchers from nearly a dozen countries. Take, for instance, her Finnish partners on a research project of an inherited skin disease that causes blisters, called bullous permphigoid.
NEWS
September 11, 1991 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I have blepharitis of the eyes, which is very uncomfortable. Is there anything I can do to control the blinking? I also wanted to know if this condition is hereditary, and what factors cause it. A: Blepharitis is a non-hereditary inflammation of the oil glands of the eyelids. There are two forms. Ulcerative blepharitis results from a highly contagious bacterial infection, usually staph, that causes swelling, redness and discomfort, as well as crusting. It is treated with antibiotic eye solutions.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 15, 2013 | By Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press
BOSTON - Health care company Johnson & Johnson has been told to pay a teenager and her parents $63 million after she suffered a life-threatening drug reaction and lost most of her skin when she took a children's pain reliever nearly a decade ago. Johnson & Johnson and its Fort Washington-based McNeil-PPC Inc. subsidiary should pay Samantha Reckis and her parents a total of $109 million, including interest, a Plymouth Superior Court jury decided on...
SPORTS
February 12, 2012
Camden Catholic's Jeff Miller hurried to an 11-second pin at 285 pounds, highlighting the Irish's 40-30 upset at Bishop Ahr in the NJSIAA South Jersey Non-Public B wrestling championship on Friday night. Miller stopped Ahr's Everett Oxner for one of the second-seeded Irish's three pins against the top-seeded Trojans. Tyler McBride added a fall at 106 pounds and Carmen Iossa scored a pin at 182. Also for the defending champion Irish, who won five straight weights from Joe Flemming's major decision at 170 to Miller's pin at 285, Chad Walsh (138 pounds)
NEWS
August 30, 2010
Geneticist Richard Lifton had been more focused on heart than skin disease, but when a former postdoc dermatologist returned to describe a baffling case, the head of Yale's genetics department was intrigued. The patient's skin was a hodgepodge of red and white patches, said Lifton. The diagnosis was a rare genetic disease called "ichthyosis en confetti," named after the diseased skin's scaly look. The red patches were inflamed skin typical of the condition, but the white patches were a mystery to Lifton and his former postdoc.
NEWS
June 20, 2010 | By Keith Pompey, Inquirer Staff Writer
Manute Bol, 47, a giant among even NBA stars and a towering symbol of hope in his native Sudan, died Saturday morning. The former 76ers center died at the University of Virginia Medical Center in Charlottesville, where he was being treated for acute kidney failure and a skin disease, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome. Mr. Bol, who at 7-foot-7 could be an intimidating defensive presence on the court, was also known for his humanitarian efforts in Sudan. He founded Sudan Sunrise, a group based in Lenexa, Kan., working to end oppression in Sudan.
SPORTS
February 3, 2009 | By Don Beideman INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In a letter to the District 1 wrestling steering committee yesterday, Ches-Mont League officials said they were suspending intra-league competition because of an outbreak of herpes gladiatorum, or mat herpes, at several league schools. The league said it was following the National Federation of High School's sports medicine advisory committee's guidelines for dealing with the skin disease. "This was done out of an abundance of caution for all of our league wrestlers," said Paul Hurley, league president and principal at Downingtown East.
NEWS
February 3, 2003 | By Marie McCullough INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A year ago, a group of Abington fertility specialists became the first in the Philadelphia area to offer the ultimate in genetic selection. In the three-stage process, embryos are created in a lab dish and tested for a particular genetic abnormality, and then only the normal ones are put in the woman's womb in the hope that one will take and she will become pregnant. It is a costly, invasive, less-than-perfect way to stack the genetic deck. But for some couples at high risk of passing on terrible genetic diseases, it is a welcome option - far less traumatic than facing the choice between aborting a defective fetus and raising a sick child.
NEWS
February 2, 1998 | For The Inquirer / BEVERLY SCHAEFER
Vitiligo, a skin disease, is the subject of a science project completed by Bianca Vulcu, 12, for the Abington Junior High School science fair. Bianca is a student in seventh grade at the school.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1996 | By Jonathan Storm, INQUIRER TELEVISION CRITIC
"Your looks are laughable," goes the old standard "My Funny Valentine," a theme song of sorts for the made-for-TV weeper, For Hope. The film is at 9 p.m. Sunday on Channel 6. After the first 10 or 15 minutes, there's very little that's laughable about For Hope, even though it's executive-produced by one of America's most recognizable funnymen, Abington's own Bob Saget. For Hope is the nonstop story of a funny, pretty and dynamic woman's agonizing slide toward death. Starring Dana Delany from China Beach as Hope, it's based on the life of Saget's sister Gay, who was diagnosed with scleroderma in early 1992, and who died April 10, 1994, at 47. She had lived in Newtown and taught at Council Rock Middle School.
LIVING
June 13, 1995 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Officially, Maria Isabel Limardo of Venezuela is studying the genetics of skin disease at Thomas Jefferson University. But the South American is also getting a lesson in world culture in the dermatology laboratory at Jefferson Medical College, where she shares workspace, scientific equipment and recipes with researchers from nearly a dozen countries. Take, for instance, her Finnish partners on a research project of an inherited skin disease that causes blisters, called bullous permphigoid.
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