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NEWS
May 14, 1988
Stupidity - like misery - loves company, and just to prove it, more than 300 motorcyclists went to Harrisburg this week to ask for the freedom to sustain even more permanent brain damage than they already have. Every year, they make the trek to the Capitol rotunda to protest the Pennsylvania law that requires them to wear helmets while they are hurtling down the highway on two wheels, with only the air to protect them from pavement, trees, road dividers and other vehicles. They make speeches about "freedom of choice, " and listen to also-not-so- bright legislators tell them that 21 is old enough to choose to mix brain parts with concrete.
SPORTS
March 27, 2002 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Goalie Mike Richter of the New York Rangers will miss at least two weeks with a broken bone in his skull, further hampering the team's playoff push. The team doesn't expect him back before the last two games of the regular season. Richter, a Germantown Academy graduate, was hit in the mask twice in the first three minutes of Friday's loss to the Florida Panthers. Elsewhere: The NHL has suspended Atlanta Thrashers center Dan Snyder for three games without pay for elbowing Ottawa's Sami Salo on Saturday.
NEWS
September 26, 1990 | By Erin Kennedy, Special to The Inquirer
Montgomery County detectives got some help from the Smithsonian Institution in identifying a skull and other human bones found in July in a wooded area of Upper Providence Township. The bones, which were found propped up against each other in a ritualistic arrangement, date back to the mid-1800s and were believed to have come from an old cemetery, Lt. John P. Durante, the county investigator on the case, said yesterday. With the help of Museum of Natural History forensic experts who examined the bones on Sept.
SPORTS
July 6, 1994 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Tab Ramos will be sidelined for a minimum of two months with a slight skull fracture and could be out of action for up to six months, a spokesman for the U.S. World Cup soccer team said yesterday. Ramos, a 27-year-old midfielder from Hillside, N.J., was injured when he was elbowed by Leonardo during Brazil's 1-0 victory on Monday at Stanford Stadium in Palo Alto, Calif. Ramos was held overnight at Stanford University Medical Center and was released late yesterday. Ramos was to return the U.S. team's training base in Mission Viejo, Calif.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Mack Reed, Special to The Inquirer
Two Philadelphia men accused of breaking into a mausoleum and stealing a skull were each sentenced to two years' probation and $500 fines yesterday in Delaware County Common Pleas Court. Thomas J. Jones and Bryan J. Cartwright, both 25, pleaded no contest yesterday to charges of abuse of a corpse and criminal conspiracy in connection with the July 19 break-in at Mount Moriah Cemetery in Yeadon Borough. Each also was ordered to pay $150 to repair the damaged mausoleum. Three witnesses - men who told the District Attorney's Office they were "socializing" at the cemetery after it had closed - said Cartwright, who lived at the cemetery and worked there as a backhoe operator, and Jones, an auto mechanic who lived in the 6800 block of Paschall Avenue, pickaxed their way into the mausoleum.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | By Tina Kelley, Special to The Inquirer
Inside an old freezer are hamburger buns, a box of beef patties, three raccoons and a gray fox. Next to that, a newer freezer. Inside: 300 frozen beaver feet, perhaps soon to be made into key chains (the front ones) or ashtrays (the back). "Honest to God, I'm a nice guy," said Paul Clark, 32, who runs Head Jobs, a custom skull-refinishing business in suburban Camden County. "It's a clean hobby. I'm not bothering anybody. It keeps me off the streets. " Small blessing.
NEWS
August 15, 1987 | By Murray Dubin, Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. and Mark Bowden, Inquirer Staff Writers
A skull and a torso, wrapped in a brown blanket and tied with a white electrical cord, were found yesterday partially buried in the basement of a house three doors away from the North Philadelphia rowhouse where police have found six bodies and the leg and foot bones of a seventh. Police were unsure whether they had found the partial remains of an eighth victim or body parts that were once connected to the leg and foot bones discovered Monday on the roof of the rowhouse at 1631 N. 19th St. Police yesterday continued their search for Harrison "Marty" Graham, who lived in the third-floor apartment at 1631 where the six bodies were discovered Sunday.
NEWS
March 23, 1999 | by Tonya Pendleton, Daily News Staff Writer
A University of Pennsylvania alumnus found dead in a campus stairwell Sunday morning died of a fractured skull and multiple injuries in a fall, a Penn official announced yesterday. Police said that Michael E. Tobin, 26, a Phi Gamma Delta alumnus, was drinking with friends for several hours Saturday night at the fraternity house on Locust Walk near 36th Street. He was last seen about 4 a.m. Sunday in the fraternity house, according to school officials. A little more than two hours later, he was discovered at the bottom of the stairs at the rear entrance of the fraternity house by fraternity members.
NEWS
July 16, 1998 | by April Adamson, Daily News Staff Writer
EDITOR'S NOTE: A typesetting error yesterday cut significant portions of two stories that were published with Part 2 of the Daily News' examination of missing persons. We are running them here in their entirety. If you did not see Part 1, you can read the entire package at our website, www.phillynews.com. The sculptures are eerily lifelike, busts that record each wrinkle, each wave of hair. The faces are so real-looking they actually begin to seem familiar. But they are faces that belong to no one - at least not right away.
NEWS
March 5, 2005 | By David Iams FOR THE INQUIRER
Three major two-day gallery sales will take place over the next week, offering in addition to fine furniture and paintings such diverse items as ancient pottery and a narwhal skull that stands almost eight feet tall. One of the more noteworthy pieces of furniture is a centennial pedestal dining room table with three leaf inserts that will be offered at tomorrow's session of a two-day auction at the Barry S. Slosberg Inc. gallery, 2501 E. Ontario St. Such tables are generically referred to as Empire Revival, but Slosberg associate Rob Goldstein said this one may have been made by Daniel Pabst, a Philadelphia furniture-maker in the 1870s and '80s associated with high-style Eastlake.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 14, 2014 | By Tom Avril, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Christopher Teti was diagnosed with aggressive brain cancer in 2011, Kevin D. Judy performed traditional surgery at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital. He removed a portion of Teti's skull and cut out the tumor. When a second tumor showed up this year, Judy tried a far less intrusive approach. He and colleagues drilled a dime-size hole in the patient's skull, inserted a slender, laser-emitting wand, and destroyed the malignant growth with heat. Aside from the drilling part, Judy did the procedure from a separate room, pushing down on a foot pedal to turn on the laser inside Teti's skull.
NEWS
October 30, 2014 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Construction of a built-in pool in a charming section of Riverton came to a "screaming" stop when a worker discovered a human skull Monday afternoon. Tuesday, the normally quiet riverfront neighborhood with turn-of-the century mansions was transformed into a crime scene with police, detectives, and an anthropologist studying what appeared to be particularly old remains. How old? Joel Bewley, spokesman for the Burlington County Prosecutor's Office, could only say "very" old until experts do a thorough analysis to determine the age, gender, identity, and cause of death, and how the skeletal remains got to the spot about six feet deep in the 600 block of Bank Avenue.
NEWS
April 4, 2014 | By Ben Finley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jazs Bronner told police that his father died after he fell and hit his head on a 10-pound barbell, the result of a father-and-son fistfight. But police said the autopsy told a different story: Orlando Bronner, 73, was struck at least four times in the head with a blunt object, and parts of his skull contained bits of metal and paint from the gold-colored free weight. Jazs Bronner, 44, was arrested late Tuesday in Bristol Township, Bucks County, and charged with a general count of homicide, the degree to be decided in court.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Leila Haghighat, Inquirer Staff Writer
William Acosta lies asleep on an operating table at Jefferson University Hospital. A surgeon is drilling a pen-sized hole into his skull. Curiously, the OR begins to smell like sawdust. Doctors then reduce his anesthesia, and Acosta, his brain still open, wakes up. Over the next five hours, Acosta, 56, of Glenside, will be both a patient and a collaborator in his own brain care. By staying awake, he will help surgeons find the part of his brain involved in Parkinson's disease.
NEWS
July 8, 2013 | By Dana DiFilippo, Philadelphia Daily News
THE SKULL appeared on a Monmouth County, N.J., beach years ago, coughed up by the surf as casually as the sand crabs and clamshells that usually speckle the shoreline. Was it a murder victim whose killer counted on the sea to hide the crime? Or maybe a loner lost in a boating or swimming mishap? It didn't take Donna Fontana long to find the answer. With one X-ray in 1987, Fontana determined that the skull wasn't a skull at all: The teeth had no roots. The head was a plastic prop from a haunted house on a pier that had burned down, leaving debris behind to be carried away by the currents.
SPORTS
May 9, 2013 | Associated Press
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. - Less than 24 hours after J.A. Happ was hit on the head by a line drive and carted off the field, the Toronto Blue Jays pitcher was back at Tropicana Field yesterday. The 30-year-old lefthander said he had a skull fracture behind his left ear that doctors believe will heal on its own, as well as a sore right knee that he tweaked when he dropped to the ground Tuesday night. Otherwise, he felt pretty good after his release from Bayfront Medical Center. He does not have a concussion.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The first chops, to the forehead, did not go through the bone and are perhaps evidence of hesitancy about the task. The next set, after the body was rolled over, was more effective. One cut split the skull all the way to the base. "The person is truly figuring it out as they go," said Douglas Owsley, a physical anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution. In the meantime, someone - perhaps with more experience - was working on a leg. The tibia bone is broken with a single blow, as one might do in butchering a cow. That's one possible version of an event that took place sometime during the winter of 1609-10 in Jamestown.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2013 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
The first thing you think when you see John Lyles is: "Boy, is he bald!" That makes the South Jersey entrepreneur the ideal pitchman for a product he designed out of necessity - the Skull Shaver. And at least one home-products industry analyst thinks this gleaming head from Cherry Hill with no experience in product development has what it takes to be a success in a market ruled by such big blades as Norelco, Braun, and Remington. That is, if Lyles sticks to emphasizing the head, as his creation's name highlights, said analyst Debra J. Mednick, executive director at market-research firm NPD Group, who also happens to be married to a bald-by-choice man. Until now, Mednick said, the dry-shave market has been about the face.
NEWS
March 23, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, Inquirer Staff Writer
The remains of a woman found in Burlington County last year revealed little about her life - or death. Officials hope an emerging portrait of what she may have looked like could generate new leads. This week, officials released a sketch that puts a face on the body found by two motorcyclists riding trails in a wooded section of Pemberton Township last summer. After months passed with no significant clues to who she was or how and when she died, forensic experts created what they think she looked like, giving her brown eyes, brown hair, and common features.
NEWS
March 22, 2013 | By Barbara Boyer, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The remains of a woman found in Burlington County last year revealed little about her life - or death. Officials hope an emerging portrait of what she may have looked like could generate new leads. This week, officials released a sketch that puts a face on the body found by two motorcyclists riding trails in a wooded section of Pemberton Township last summer. After months passed with no significant clues to who she was or how and when she died, forensic experts created what they think she looked like, giving her brown eyes, brown hair, and common features.
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