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NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank L. Rizzo outscored the Eagles in their own stadium yesterday. While the Eagles were scoring 37 points in their Veterans Stadium win over the Dallas Cowboys, who put up 20, Rizzo was pumping hands on his way to 40 - grand that is. About 40 contributors paid $1,000 each for the chance to shake hands with the GOP mayoral candidate, munch hot dogs, sip drinks and watch the game in a skybox rented by the Rizzo campaign. The skybox was one of 80 built by the city as part of a deal made by Mayor Goode in 1984 to keep the Eagles from moving to Phoenix.
NEWS
October 23, 1986
In the Oct. 13 Inquirer I read that Blue Cross had spent $123,000 for paintings from local artists to decorate its office. It also stated that Blue Cross was forming a "for-profit subsidiary" with $25 million of its subscribers' money. The first transaction of this subsidiary involved the sale and resale of an advertising agency, which created an artificial profit for the new entity and included a lease for a skybox at Veterans Stadium and a large block of tickets to sporting events.
BUSINESS
June 5, 1991 | by Sheila Simmons, Daily News Staff Writer BY LESLIE SCISM
Some companies say they would consider spending money for a skybox at a new indoor arena in Philadelphia, but others were steadfastly opposed to the idea. Spectacor spokesman Larry Rubin said the company plans to hold a news conference in "a couple of weeks" to unveil its plans for a new indoor stadium. Among the maybe's: Bell of Pennsylvania, which "would look favorably upon receiving a proposal," said Chuck Fulton, director of external affairs. Fulton said the skybox the company has at the Vet "has proven to be a very valuable tool for (marketing)
BUSINESS
August 19, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The news won't mean much to the peanut gallery, but over the weekend a congressional committee decided that corporate deductions associated with luxury stadium boxes should be phased out. A joint House-Senate conference committee approved sweeping tax code revisions, proposals that will likely be voted on the House and Senate next month. The committee recommended that many business deductions be reduced in size, but proposed a complete phase-out of the skybox deduction. "For some reason, they've singled us out," said Dave Montgomery, executive vice president of the Phillies, which operates close to 50 superboxes on the 400 level of Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
October 26, 1987 | By JOSEPH GRACE, Daily News Staff Writer
Frank L. Rizzo outscored the Eagles in their own stadium yesterday. While the Eagles were scoring 37 points in their Veterans Stadium win over the Dallas Cowboys, who put up 20, Rizzo was pumping hands on his way to 40 - grand that is. About 40 contributors paid $1,000 each for the chance to shake hands with the GOP mayoral candidate, munch hot dogs, sip drinks and watch the game in a skybox rented by the Rizzo campaign. The skybox was one of 80 built by the city as part of a deal made by Mayor Goode in 1984 to keep the Eagles from moving to Phoenix.
SPORTS
February 4, 1999 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
When does a $490 million investment become one worth $30 million? The answer is Monday, when Fleer/SkyBox was sold to a privately held corporation headed by Rite Aid founder Alex Grass and his son Roger. The news broke when Trade Fax, the hobby's official fax newsletter, spit out the information in mid-morning. For most of the Fleer/SkyBox employees in Mount Laurel, N.J., the news came as a surprise. According to Dan Gould at Sports Collectors Digest, the newsletter was the vehicle that broke the news locally.
NEWS
June 4, 1997 | By Jane M. Von Bergen and Michael Klein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS Inquirer staff writer Marcia C. Smith contributed to this story
All season, as the Flyers won game after game, local executives hunkered down behind their mahogany desks and sweated out numbers. Not price-earnings ratios, not inventory levels, not sales figures. They were fretting about seat numbers in their luxury boxes at the CoreStates Center. "When [the Flyers] made the finals, we heard from people we hadn't heard from all year," said Ken Schwartz, general manager of Jack & Jill, the ice cream manufacturer in Bensalem. Divvying up a company's Stanley Cup ducats is a major business decision, potentially affecting the bottom line and people's feelings.
NEWS
September 6, 1987 | By Vernon Loeb, Inquirer Staff Writer
Leave your Mercedes with the valet and step onto an elevator encased in glass. When the doors open at the top, eight seconds later, a concierge in a tuxedo will escort you to your suite, where the furnishings are contemporary, tasteful - and obviously expensive. The view is spectacular, the bar is stocked and lunch is on its way. You could be at a four-star hotel or a fine French restaurant. But on a crisp, fall Sunday afternoon there is no better place to be than right there in your own luxury skybox, with a football field and as many as 66,592 screaming people out the big picture window.
SPORTS
January 20, 2000 | by Ted Taylor, For the Daily News
Fleer/SkyBox sent another message to the hobby bad guys this month when it obtained an injunction in the U.S. District Court for Eastern Pennsylvania precluding the sale of counterfeit 1998 Showcase Legacy trading cards. The order, issued Jan. 9, permanently enjoins a Lansdale card dealer from whom more than 450 cards have been seized, according to a press release issued by Fleer/Skybox. In addition to the injunction, an award of $50,000 in damages was entered against the dealer, and part of the final judgment required him to refund money to any customer who purchased cards from him without knowledge that they were counterfeit, according to the press release.
NEWS
June 18, 2009
The scrimmage between City Hall and the Philadelphia Eagles dragged on longer than a Super Bowl pregame show. But the dispute that consumed so much time and energy - and breathless calls to 610 WIP - has mercifully come to an end. The upshot after the second ruling from a judge yesterday: The Eagles owe the city $3 million. That's about how much Donovan McNabb will make in the first few weeks of the season. While the payout is a pittance, the bigger cost is the time, money, public goodwill, and legal fees that both the city and Eagles spent on dueling lawsuits over skybox revenues and compensation for the cancellation of a 2001 preseason game due to poor field conditions at city-owned Veterans Stadium.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
February 18, 2015 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Simpatico Theatre Project presents Obie Award-winning Milk Like Sugar by Kirsten Greenidge, an engrossing drama that is both a cautionary tale and a societal indictment, with a superb cast. Greenidge can write what sounded to me to be pitch-perfect dialogue, and Alan Radway directs the ensemble with respect and a clever use of the Adrienne Theatre's Skybox space. Three teenage African American girls, living in a ghettoized community in any American city, are sworn friends: Annie (Nastassja Baset)
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2013 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
To the list of things about Philly that natives love and tourists don't get (Eagles fans, Mummers, Tastykakes), we could easily add the world premiere of Josh Piven's No Reservations , a homegrown Christmas comedy with a sharp bite. Piven sets the play, now at the Skybox at the Adrienne, on Christmas Eve at a Lancaster, Pa., bed-and-breakfast owned by Mr. and Mrs. Harris (Jared Michael Delaney and Wendy Staton). Deep in debt, conjugally estranged, and with the place falling apart, they long for their one day off each year to relax.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2013 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
To breed or not to breed? That is the question facing M (David Raphaely) and W (Charlotte Ford) in Luna Theater's production of Duncan MacMillan's Lungs at the Adrienne. In unremarkable clothes, without props, sound design, sets, or scene changes, they agonize, argue, love, leave, return, reconcile, and endlessly orbit one another, the centers of their own tiny universe. MacMillan and director Gregory Scott Campbell present the simplest human situation without embellishment, and in doing so, illuminate its complexity.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By Wendy Rosenfield, For The Inquirer
Tiny, sturdy Sylvia Kauders' Mama has the stoic face of thousands of Jewish grandmothers before her. When she announces, deadpan in a fluffy bathrobe, to her son Ronnie, "Did you hear who's coming? The Momzer," the audience for Marty's Back in Town , a new play by attorney/author Norman Shabel at the Skybox at the Adrienne, laughs. A momzer is a jerk, a thorn in your side, and the audience knows: These are our mishpucha , our kind of people, and this is a comic family drama that will be sprinkled with liberal doses of Yiddish, in which crazy relatives will argue, eat, and reconcile, Neil Simon-style.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2012 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
So you've outgrown trick-or-treating, you're sick of the same old parade of masked killers on the movie channels, and the thought of running through a cornfield or an abandoned building with community-theater ghouls on your heels makes you yawn. Fear not. There are still plenty of options for the Halloween aficionado in the Philadelphia area this weekend. Eye screams The Philadelphia Film Festival looks back Friday night at a pair of spine-chillers from the past, with screenings of the haunted-TV classic Poltergeist at 9:30 at Shoemaker Green at Penn and M. Night Shyamalan's alien-invasion (with a twist)
NEWS
June 18, 2009
The scrimmage between City Hall and the Philadelphia Eagles dragged on longer than a Super Bowl pregame show. But the dispute that consumed so much time and energy - and breathless calls to 610 WIP - has mercifully come to an end. The upshot after the second ruling from a judge yesterday: The Eagles owe the city $3 million. That's about how much Donovan McNabb will make in the first few weeks of the season. While the payout is a pittance, the bigger cost is the time, money, public goodwill, and legal fees that both the city and Eagles spent on dueling lawsuits over skybox revenues and compensation for the cancellation of a 2001 preseason game due to poor field conditions at city-owned Veterans Stadium.
NEWS
June 9, 2009
SWEET! The city has won a scrimmage with the Eagles on a hotly debated $8 million tab that the city has been trying to collect from the team. Yesterday, a Common Pleas Court judge ruled that the Eagles do owe the city $8 million for the share of skybox revenue they had promised to the city in exchange for a break the city gave the team, which, in 1985, was struggling financially. (Today, the team is worth $1 billion, according to Forbes magazine.) But the 2001 deadline for the payment came and went, and the Eagles didn't pay. They in turn claimed the city owed them money for canceling an exhibition game, and that made them essentially even.
NEWS
April 3, 2009
RE THE EAGLES and the "secret" deal they had with John Street to settle the $8 million skybox dispute, I don't think Jeff Lurie and company have a leg to stand on. If it ain't in writing and ain't on tape, it ain't legal. Period! No judge in this town with half a brain will let the Eagles get away with this nonsense, nor should Mayor Nutter let it happen, either. For Jeffrey Lurie, who recently made the Billionaires Club, to stiff the city over a mere $8 million is revolting.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Former Mayor John F. Street said yesterday that he had struck no agreement with the Eagles to substantially reduce the team's $8 million debt to the city during private negotiations years ago that led to the building of Lincoln Financial Field. "I didn't cut a secret deal. There was no deal. We didn't make a deal. . . . And if I had agreed to a deal, I would have put it in writing," Street said last night during a rare City Hall appearance. "The one thing I did commit to," he continued, "is we would absolutely make a reasonable effort to come to a fair settlement and hopefully without litigation.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
Former Mayor John Street denied claims yesterday by the Philadelphia Eagles that he quietly agreed to and then reneged on a deal to settle an $8 million dispute with the city for less than $1 million during his first term. The Eagles made their claim in affidavits filed in court last month by team owner Jeffrey Lurie, president Joe Banner and Dean Adler, an attorney who represented the city in the negotiations to build Lincoln Financial Field. Adler, who worked with the late developer Willard Rouse on the stadium negotiations, said that Street agreed to accept an "insignificant amount" from the Eagles.
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