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NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Pauline Jelinek, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Army investigators said Monday they found no bullet wound nor evidence of foul play in the death of a soldier in Afghanistan who died during a Skype video chat with his wife. Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark collapsed while speaking to his wife on May 1 from his base in Tarin Kot, Afghanistan, southwest of Kabul. His wife, Susan Orellana-Clark, has suggested that Clark was shot, citing a hole visible in the closet behind him that she believed was a bullet hole. Investigators said an initial probe showed no trauma to the body except that Clark broke his nose when he fell forward.
BUSINESS
May 11, 2011 | By Jeff Gelles, Inquirer Columnist
Will Microsoft end the magic of Skype, or improve it? That's the $8.5 billion question. You may not use the Internet-based phone and video-calling service, but chances are that you have kids or grandkids who do. For a young person on a budget, what's not to like about free video calls - a futurist's dream of my own youth - or free overseas phone calls? When she's not working late, my 22-year-old daughter Skypes nightly with her boyfriend in another city, and visits frequently with other far-flung college friends.
NEWS
July 10, 2011 | By Bob Fernandez, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neil Smit has a goal: to have Comcast Corp. launch one new product each quarter - a seemingly ambitious vision for a 100,000-employee company that stumbled badly when it launched its phone service several years ago and had a poor reputation for customer service. But there is evidence that Smit, the president of the cable division since January 2010 and a hard-driving ex-Navy SEAL, could make it happen. During the last five weeks, the cable giant has disclosed such products as home-security services offered through its Xfinity broadband service and a cloud-based, Amazon.com-inspired personalized channel guide that is being tested in Augusta, Ga., and will be available nationally in 2012.
NEWS
May 7, 2012 | By Terry Wallace, Associated Press
DALLAS - An Army nurse showed no alarm or discomfort before suddenly collapsing during a Skype video chat with his wife, who saw a bullet hole in a closet behind him, his family said Sunday. Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark's family released a statement describing what his wife saw in the video feed recording her husband's death. "Clark was suddenly knocked forward," the statement said. "The closet behind him had a bullet hole in it. The other individuals, including a member of the military, who rushed to the home of CPT Clark's wife also saw the hole and agreed it was a bullet hole.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Internet usage spiking, Comcast Corp. will eliminate its monthly 250-gigabyte cap for Xfinity Internet subscribers but charge additional $10 fees for users who exceed 300 gigabytes. The 300-gigabyte limit could be used to videoconference on Skype for 225 hours, or watch more than 100 hours of Netflix movies. Final details of the new plan were not available on Thursday because they have not been developed, company officials said in a conference call. The nation's largest broadband company with 18 million Internet subscribers will experiment with two new usage-consumption models in markets around the country before determining the best option for it and consumers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I have just one ground rule when I visit book clubs," novelist Nomi Eve said. "My standard phrase is, 'I have a thick skin, but it's not that thick, so please be nice to me.' " It's just as well that Eve's fans take her words to heart. Over the last six months, the lifelong Elkins Park resident has visited 90 book clubs to discuss her latest novel, Henna House . "I go into so many people's living rooms, and if they beat up on me, I'll come home every night crying," said Eve, who turned 47 last month.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
M ASON REINER, 36, and Dr. Randy Robinson, 41, both of Elkins Park, are co-founders and CEO and chief medical officer, respectively, of R-Health. The Center City startup, launched in October, charges a monthly membership fee that enables individuals, employers, unions and small businesses to see primary-care doctors without co-pays or deductibles administered through a health insurer. I spoke with Reiner, who is a Wharton School graduate and serial entrepreneur. Q: Where did you get the money to start the business?
ENTERTAINMENT
August 6, 2011 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I have a 2-year-old daughter (almost 3). My mother lives several states away, but we Skype regularly; she rarely visits. She has always been very focused on looks - I grew up feeling unattractive - and now she has turned her attention to my daughter, saying things during our Skyping discussions like, "She's too fat. She needs to exercise every day. And she needs plastic surgery on her nose. " My daughter is an adorable and perfectly normal girl. I'm afraid she might start understanding these things soon.
NEWS
July 13, 2011 | By John Timpane, Inquirer Staff Writer
Keep it simple . . . We can't say stupid because the folks we're talking about here are Google, Facebook, Skype, and Microsoft. Recent moves make it abundantly clear: The future of social media lies in making very complicated, advanced technology easy for the user. In May, Microsoft (a shareholder in Facebook) said it would buy video-chatter Skype for $8.5 billion. On June 28, Google rolled out Google+ (or Google Plus)   , its long-awaited counterpart to Facebook.
NEWS
May 19, 2011 | By George Anastasia, Inquirer Staff Writer
Cape May County Sheriff Gary Schaffer was watching his wife talk to their 3-year-old granddaughter via Skype, the audio-video Internet communication system, when the thought occurred to him. "There's got to be a way . . . ," the veteran law enforcement official thought. Earlier this month Schaffer unveiled the product of his brainstorming, and the Cape May County Jail became the first in the nation to offer totally online visitation service to all of its inmates. The county has contracted with iWebVisit.com, a Nevada-based video conference service that has developed a program that allows anyone anywhere to log on and arrange to visit an inmate.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
"I have just one ground rule when I visit book clubs," novelist Nomi Eve said. "My standard phrase is, 'I have a thick skin, but it's not that thick, so please be nice to me.' " It's just as well that Eve's fans take her words to heart. Over the last six months, the lifelong Elkins Park resident has visited 90 book clubs to discuss her latest novel, Henna House . "I go into so many people's living rooms, and if they beat up on me, I'll come home every night crying," said Eve, who turned 47 last month.
NEWS
October 21, 2014 | By Alfred Lubrano, Inquirer Staff Writer
Mike, the funny one, got serious for a second and explained the whole thing like this: "There's a law in Philly neighborhoods that says friends must stay together for life. " Adhering to the letter of that particular precept, eight pals who grew up in West Oak Lane in the 1950s and '60s gathered at a home in Rydal, Montgomery County, on Sunday, repeating a frequent ritual they've followed for decades. Ostensibly, the guys were there to play half-ball and step ball, eat pretzels, and bust one another's chops with no mercy.
NEWS
January 10, 2014
M ASON REINER, 36, and Dr. Randy Robinson, 41, both of Elkins Park, are co-founders and CEO and chief medical officer, respectively, of R-Health. The Center City startup, launched in October, charges a monthly membership fee that enables individuals, employers, unions and small businesses to see primary-care doctors without co-pays or deductibles administered through a health insurer. I spoke with Reiner, who is a Wharton School graduate and serial entrepreneur. Q: Where did you get the money to start the business?
NEWS
June 8, 2013 | By Barton Gellman and Laura Poitras, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The National Security Agency and the FBI are tapping directly into the central servers of nine leading U.S. Internet companies, extracting audio and video chats, photographs, e-mails, documents, and connection logs that enable analysts to track one target or trace a whole network of associates, according to a top-secret document obtained by the Washington Post. The program, code-named PRISM, has not been made public until now. It may be the first of its kind. The NSA prides itself on stealing secrets and breaking codes, and it is accustomed to corporate partnerships that help it divert data traffic or sidestep barriers.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
Eventually the most ardent tweeter, texter, and instant messenger must face, not Facebook, the truth. "People have to talk to other people," says Matthew Goldberg, the Voorhees chapter president of Toastmasters International, which has been enhancing oral communication skills for 89 years. Goldberg, 53, knows whereof he speaks. He'll be among six vying Saturday in Langhorne for a chance to become one of 88 finalists in a global Toastmasters speech-fest starting Aug. 21 in Cincinnati.
NEWS
April 6, 2013 | By Mary Grace Keller, OWEN J. ROBERTS HIGH SCHOOL
Allen R. Collins Jr. sits at his daughter's kitchen table, smiling over a cup of coffee. The 84-year-old Korean War veteran with a flannel shirt and a weathered face is eager to tell his story. Rewind more than 60 years in history and you'll find a young Army corporal Collins. He's fighting in a bunker along the 38th Parallel, carrying a Browning automatic rifle, a Bible, and a few intimate letters from his loved ones. Today, thousands of miles away from home, in the Zabul Province of Afghanistan, Staff Sgt. Ismael Escobar, 32, relies on Facebook and Skype rather than letters to stay in touch with his wife and children.
NEWS
July 3, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Fawzi went down the Shore the other day. This was big. He'd never seen the ocean before. Not even the sea, and he'd spent his whole life 20 minutes from the Mediterranean. His hosts in this country - Jerry Roseman and Alia Banna - had planned to take him to Cape May. But Fawzi got restless in the car and the couple settled for Avalon. Before he could sink his feet in the sand, Alia's iPhone rang. The boy's mother was calling from Qabatiya, a farming village in the West Bank.
NEWS
June 7, 2012 | By Stephanie Farr and Daily News Staff Writer
BELIEVING he was handling an unloaded gun, an 18-year-old accidentally shot himself in the head during a webcam chat early Wednesday when the person on the other end of the conversation challenged the teen's manhood, police said.   To make matters worse, the teen's two brothers — one of whom is just 13 — were in the room when the shooting occurred, said East Detectives Capt. John Gallagher. As of Wednesday night, the teen, whom police did not identify, was brain-dead and in extremely critical condition at Temple University Hospital.
BUSINESS
May 19, 2012 | By Bob Fernandez, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With Internet usage spiking, Comcast Corp. will eliminate its monthly 250-gigabyte cap for Xfinity Internet subscribers but charge additional $10 fees for users who exceed 300 gigabytes. The 300-gigabyte limit could be used to videoconference on Skype for 225 hours, or watch more than 100 hours of Netflix movies. Final details of the new plan were not available on Thursday because they have not been developed, company officials said in a conference call. The nation's largest broadband company with 18 million Internet subscribers will experiment with two new usage-consumption models in markets around the country before determining the best option for it and consumers.
NEWS
May 8, 2012 | By Pauline Jelinek, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Army investigators said Monday they found no bullet wound nor evidence of foul play in the death of a soldier in Afghanistan who died during a Skype video chat with his wife. Capt. Bruce Kevin Clark collapsed while speaking to his wife on May 1 from his base in Tarin Kot, Afghanistan, southwest of Kabul. His wife, Susan Orellana-Clark, has suggested that Clark was shot, citing a hole visible in the closet behind him that she believed was a bullet hole. Investigators said an initial probe showed no trauma to the body except that Clark broke his nose when he fell forward.
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