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Slaughterhouse

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NEWS
November 7, 2006
MARK KRAM'S feature on the sexual problems in breeding race horses was fascinating ("Pony up, big boy," Nov. 3). The only thing missing was the fact that being a dud at stud has led to slaughter for some equine champions. The revelation of this has, in turn, prompted extremely strong support for a ban on horse slaughter in this country. The current push to outlaw the slaughter was fired up when it was learned that Ferdinand, the 1986 Kentucky Derby winner (ridden by no less than Willie Shoemaker)
NEWS
October 19, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Up from the valley below Main Street, past the Carters' house, past the volunteer fire department and past the borough hall, came the now-familiar odor. Goat hair was burning again. "Hmm, it's not bad today," said Charles Sommer, president of this York County village on the Maryland-Pennsylvania border west of the Susquehanna River. "Sometimes, it smells like you're in a closed room and just put a chicken with the feathers on it on a grill. " This noxious smell wafts up nearly every weekend from Paper Mill Farm's Meats, a small slaughterhouse, and it has become the hottest political issue of the moment in this borough of 720. Hotter than the presence, two miles away, of the Peach Bottom nuclear power plant that was once closed because operators were sleeping on the job. Hotter than the expensive plans to build the community's first sewage-treatment plant.
NEWS
June 1, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Virtually nothing makes much sense or rings true in Kathy Anderson's new play, The Meatpackers Book Club, all the worse because it's not one of those plays that's supposed to make no sense. In fact, it's hard to tell just what Meatpackers is trying to do, the playwriting is so rickety. The play, in its world premiere by Philadelphia Theatre Workshop, where Anderson is associate artistic director, is at first an indictment of hazardous industrial working conditions, then soon becomes a play about a new book club in a slaughterhouse break room where the very people who have just tsk-tsk'd about such working conditions are now ignoring them, big time.
NEWS
December 28, 1990 | By Debbie Stone, Daily News Staff Writer
Joe Frazier says he was the first cow-puncher at the old Cross Brothers Meat Packing Co. The slaughterhouse in Kensington, which went out of business in 1979 and was destroyed by fire early yesterday, was used for a scene in the first "Rocky" movie. The scene showed Rocky Balboa, played by Sylvester Stallone, getting himself in shape for his big fight against champion Apollo Creed by punching sides of beef suspended from rails in a meatpacking plant. But Frazier, a real boxer who reigned as heavyweight champ from 1968 to 1973, claims he was the model for the Rocky character.
NEWS
January 25, 2000 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When it was built nearly a half-century ago, the old slaughterhouse along French Creek was an integral part of the local farming community in northern Chester County, efficiently dispatching thousands of cattle to the land of steaks, roasts and burgers. But as the region's farms give way to homes, the building at the intersection of Pughtown and Hollow Roads in East Vincent Township was abandoned. It is now a dangerously deteriorated, polluted eyesore that the Green Valleys Association wants to tear down.
NEWS
February 28, 1999 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mission accomplished. Organizers of a campaign to keep 27 horses from the butcher block claimed victory yesterday as a Salem County sheriff's sale ended with the animals destined for new homes instead of the slaughterhouse. Ten of the horses were bought by the Standardbred Retirement Foundation, which amassed a war chest of more than $10,000 in donations to ensure that none of the horses - especially the nags - ended up in the hands of those the rescuers call "the killers.
NEWS
December 21, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
A municipal judge yesterday ordered the arrest of the owner of a homegrown-livestock and slaughtering operation after the man failed to appear in court on animal-cruelty charges. Judge Nicholas Lacovara issued a bench warrant and set $25,000 cash bail for Aimen Soudi after seeing pictures taken last month of conditions at Soudi's Chicken Hut Livestock/Halaal Farms on Coles Mill Road. Soudi, 41, had been scheduled to appear on four charges and a total of seven counts of animal cruelty and neglect, all filed by the Gloucester County Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.
NEWS
September 13, 2000 | By Jennifer Moroz, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Already facing a state indictment on two counts of illegally dumping pollutants, the owner of a Salem County slaughterhouse has been hit with another complaint, this time for allegedly bullying an environmental investigator. The state Attorney General's Office filed the complaint Monday with Salem County Superior Court against Anthony Bonaccurso, owner of Salem Packing Co., on behalf of David Fields, a specialist with the state Department of Environmental Protection. According to the complaint, Bonaccurso, 70, of Haddonfield, threatened Fields when he tried to issue Bonaccurso a notice of violation July 28. Fields was at the plant to follow up on complaints of illegal dumping of bloody runoff and entrails from the operation, which slaughters cattle, pigs and lambs.
NEWS
November 30, 1997 | Inquirer photographs by Michael S. Wirtz
About 200 pigs were paraded up and down East Shurs Lane in Manayunk yesterday as part of their training for a scene in the movie "Beloved" showing the pigs being led to a slaughterhouse. The scene may be shot Wednesday.
NEWS
April 13, 1998 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
The Easter Chicken is alive and clucking - but only because it decided to cross the road. The chicken bolted from a loading dock at a poultry processing plant in Queen Village last week and dashed into the middle of Swanson Street, where dogwalker Kerri Hunter-Woodman and her client, Raggs, found it. "It was a chicken, just nonchalantly walking down the street" as cars swerved around it, she said. She was trying to grab the bird for a rescue when a car squealed to a stop and two men jumped out. The chicken took one look at the men and took off. "The feathers were flying," Hunter-Woodman said.
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NEWS
February 13, 2013
Bullfighting gains in Spain MADRID - Spain took a key first step Tuesday toward enshrining bullfighting as a key part of the nation's cultural heritage, a move that could roll back a ban on the blood-soaked pageants in the northeastern region of Catalonia. Lawmakers in parliament accepted a petition from bullfight supporters asking for the special status in a 180-40 vote that included 107 abstentions. A parliamentary cultural commission will now begin work on proposed legislation over the coming months with expectations that it will go to a vote this year.
NEWS
January 19, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Kelsey Lefever was well-known in the Pennsylvania horse world. The 24-year-old horse trainer from Chester County competed at the Devon Horse Show and traded show ponies and draft horses on the Internet. At Penn National, near Harrisburg, one of the biggest racetracks in the state, she schmoozed thoroughbred owners, telling them she would find great homes for their horses when their racing careers were over. In fact, state police allege, Lefever was selling the horses - as many as 120, by her admission - to contractors for a Canadian slaughterhouse, where they were butchered and shipped overseas for human consumption.
NEWS
December 4, 2011
And So It Goes Kurt Vonnegut: A Life By Charles J. Shields Henry Holt. 513 pp. $30 Reviewed by Carole Mallory   And So It Goes , Charles J. Shields' riveting biography of Kurt Vonnegut, examines the late author from every side, not all of them flattering. Although it's an authorized biography, written with Vonnegut's cooperation, Shields doesn't flinch from showing some less attractive character traits that made their way into Vonnegut's fiction - for example, a cruel streak that dated to his childhood and manifested itself throughout much of his work.
NEWS
July 11, 2011 | By Bonnie L. Cook, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Kayli, the white cow that fled an Upper Darby slaughter market late last month and led police on a merry chase before being corralled to face an uncertain future has landed at her new home. Kayli was off-loaded from an animal carrier this morning and got her first look at the Woodstock Farm Sanctuary in upstate New York where she will graze and chew her cud for the rest of her life. She met her new handler, Jenny Brown, and bumped noses with two enormous steers, one of whom seemed to be smitten.
NEWS
July 8, 2011
Judge bares truth about robe The case of the missing judicial robe at the Criminal Justice Center was solved yesterday when it turned out that a secretary had mistakenly picked it up. Municipal Judge Joseph C. Waters - who on Wednesday said that his judicial robe had vanished from a robing room in the CJC - said the whole thing had turned out to be a big misunderstanding. "One of the judges' secretaries inadvertently picked it up, thinking it belonged to another judge," Waters said.
NEWS
June 25, 2011 | By ALBERT STUMM, stumma@phillynews.com 215-854-5128
Her life was on the line, and in one moment, there was an opportunity to run. It didn't take long for her to get caught, but in the end, that break for freedom saved her hide - literally. Nearly a week after bolting from an Upper Darby slaughterhouse, a cow has been spared, destined to spend the rest of her life in a New York animal sanctuary. "Certainly, a cow that escapes its death and is running for its life and makes it out of a slaughterhouse facility is worth saving," said Elissa Katz, an animal-rights maven working on behalf of Animal ACTivists of Philly, which led the charge to save the cow. The deal was made only after Katz connected with a Muslim-rights group to work on behalf of the butcher shop, and both got the state Department of Agriculture to waive regulations forbidding the sale of animals bound for slaughter, and other rules.
NEWS
June 24, 2011 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writers
The fate of a white bovine that fled certain death at an Upper Darby slaughter market Saturday night, only to be recaptured, hung in the balance Thursday. Marianne Bessey, an animal activist, heard how the cow had escaped and run wild through the streets before being corralled Saturday. She was moved by the cow's plight to go to the Madina Live Poultry market on Fourth Street Thursday morning, hoping to spring the beast. In her hand was $800. Outside stood a truck with trailer, to take the creature to a life of leisure at the Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary in New York.
NEWS
June 1, 2009 | By Howard Shapiro INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Virtually nothing makes much sense or rings true in Kathy Anderson's new play, The Meatpackers Book Club, all the worse because it's not one of those plays that's supposed to make no sense. In fact, it's hard to tell just what Meatpackers is trying to do, the playwriting is so rickety. The play, in its world premiere by Philadelphia Theatre Workshop, where Anderson is associate artistic director, is at first an indictment of hazardous industrial working conditions, then soon becomes a play about a new book club in a slaughterhouse break room where the very people who have just tsk-tsk'd about such working conditions are now ignoring them, big time.
NEWS
May 8, 2008 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Four months after inhumane treatment of cows revealed at a California slaughterhouse led to the largest meat recall in U.S. history, the Humane Society of the United States yesterday released new undercover videos of crippled cows at livestock auctions in four states, including Pennsylvania. The Humane Society says the videos, showing five cows and a calf unable to stand, demonstrates a lack of federal or state oversight at auctions and stockyards - the intermediate point from farm to slaughterhouse, where regulations rules require cows to be inspected.
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