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NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
He was one of the first great chefs of Philadelphia - in fact, of the young nation. The chief cook in President George Washington's home here in 1790 had only one name: Hercules. In the mansion's open-hearth kitchen, where elaborate banquets were prepared, where spitted meats sizzled and "fricaseys" simmered in cast-iron pans over hickory fires, underlings scurried to execute the orders of Hercules, "the great master-spirit," according to one account, who seemed to be everywhere at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Caleb Deschanel's haunting new version of the story of Robinson Crusoe arrives today with a conspicuous absentee that makes this a weekend without Friday. As soon as the storm-tossed vessel founders on the reef, we realize that one of the rats deserting the sinking ship in Crusoe is none other than Crusoe himself. Deschanel has moved Daniel Defoe's timeless consideration of man, nature and civilization forward by a century and turned Crusoe into an American slave-trader. In this revisionist reading, Crusoe is an unsympathetic figure forced by adversity and circumstances to reconsider his moral failings.
NEWS
January 31, 2008 | By Walter T. Bowne
As an English teacher, I reencounter my "frugality heroes" every year. When Ben Franklin quotes Proverbs 22:7, "The borrower is slave to the lender," in The Way to Wealth, I not only listen - I obey. But not many Americans do. It's the dream, of course, to buy Versailles on a corner lot with three-car garages, turrets, atriums, and cathedral ceilings. In contrast, my house is a twin on a postage-lot, but my two daughters each have a bedroom and share a bathroom. With recession warnings, I'm quite happy with my $702 mortgage.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
PERHAPS it's not a big surprise that "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed movie based on the true story of a free black man who was sold into slavery in the 1840s, won the Academy Award for best picture. It had already won critical acclaim and praise for its lead actors, director and writer (all of whom were nominated for Oscars as well). Besides, as Ellen DeGeneres, the host of the show, joked at the beginning of the evening, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters had only two options: Either they could bestow their highest honor on "12 Years a Slave," or they were all racists.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Shhh. Listen closely. Do you hear faraway waves slapping against a ship? What about the faint chattering of children? Do you hear anything anymore about the vessel that disturbed the waters off West Africa, whose cargo was children sold into slavery? No? Such silence is unacceptable. Two months have passed since a brief international spotlight fell on a ship called the Etireno, turned away by two nations because it was being used for child trafficking. The world waited to see whether the ship would be found, whether the children aboard were safe.
NEWS
December 12, 2001 | By Bethany Klein FOR THE INQUIRER
Britney Spears paid a visit to the First Union Center on Monday night, and the runway show did not disappoint. The pop princess opened with a beguiling little number in sequined black, reminiscent of an Elvis jumpsuit, but showing more skin than the King would have dared. Sequins were the theme of the concert, delicately balanced by an abundance of midriff and cleavage. Halfway through the collection, Spears paraded around in a hat that easily could have doubled as a dark-chocolate cake topped with strawberry frosting.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
A collection of rare slave hire badges and an extensive gathering of colonial coinage will be highlights of the Stack's auction Sept. 8 and 9 at the Park Central Hotel, Seventh Avenue at 56th Street, during the New York Numismatic Convention. The appearance of 14 slave hire badges are a graphic reminder of the practice of urban slave owners who hired out slaves for work as maids, fishermen, mechanics, carpenters and fruit sellers. Several Southern cities passed ordinances governing the practice, and many required the slaves to wear hire tags.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 20-year-old woman sighed in relief, then sobbed into the shoulder of her boyfriend. She had just watched a jury convict David Pepe, a security guard, of making her his "sex slave" for three days in his Kensington home in December 1997. The panel deliberated for only 45 minutes. After yesterday's verdict on charges of rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, kidnapping and related offenses, Common Pleas Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes deferred sentencing until tomorrow.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
UNDER THE heading Better Late Than Never: "12 Years a Slave" finally gives America a definitive movie on its peculiar institution. One could chastise Hollywood for being overdue, except that this movie isn't very Hollywood. British director Steve McQueen migrated to movies from the art world, and that's significant, because Hollywood, with its entertainment imperative ("Gone with the Wind"), has seemed to lack the language to properly explain the historic monstrosity that is slavery.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 9, 2015 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
She was known variously as Alice, Alice of Dunk's Ferry, Black Alice, or Old Alice. She was a slave who lived at least 108 years - some say 116 - and saw three centuries. She never learned how to read or write, and never gained her freedom, but her head was filled with priceless memories. Alice could tell a story like no one else - whether it was about meeting William Penn, the founder of Pennsylvania; witnessing the early days of Philadelphia; or navigating boats between Dunk's Ferry - now Beverly - and what is now Bensalem.
NEWS
May 11, 2015
ISSUE | 911 UPGRADE Safety measure sandbagged Why does David Williams of the Taxpayers Protection Alliance conflate Gov. Wolf's $4.5 billion tax increase with the effort to modernize and update the 911 system ("In Pa., go for spending cuts, not tax increases," May 6)? House Bill 911 was introduced by the Republican chairman of the Veterans Affairs and Emergency Preparedness Committee for "reasonably necessary costs that enhance, operate, or maintain a 911 system. " It's not in the governor's proposal, and it would not aid the general fund.
NEWS
February 18, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a 1989 interview, Nobel Prize-winning novelist Toni Morrison lamented the lack of markers or signs that attested to the lives of slaves in America. She envisioned benches near spots where enslaved and freed Africans made their mark on history. More than two decades later, a literary society dedicated to her work has taken on the task of placing benches and informational plaques at sites where history was made. The effort is the brainchild of the Toni Morrison Society, a group of scholars who in 2006 launched a project to see her wish fulfilled.
NEWS
February 16, 2015 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Some historians believe Timbuctoo was a tiny community of fugitive slaves established in a Burlington County woods with the help of Quakers nearly four decades before the Civil War broke out. But a descendant of one of the first Timbuctoo families says he discovered during a genealogical search that the enclave's rich history goes beyond reports that it was just a stop on the Underground Railroad and the scene of pitched battles between escaped slaves...
NEWS
February 10, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
It took just 33 words and a moment of Quaker silence for William Boen to pledge himself in marriage, and 33 words more for his bride, Dido, to pledge herself to him. "Friends," Boen declared in a fieldstone farmhouse in Burlington County 252 years ago, "I take this, my friend Dido, to be my spouse. " For all its apparent simplicity, however, the historic exchange of vows - reenacted Sunday at the old farmhouse in Westampton - had been no easy matter to arrange in colonial times. The ceremony took place at Peachfield, the manor house on 120 acres that is today the headquarters of the New Jersey branch of the Society of Colonial Dames.
NEWS
December 2, 2014 | By Jan Hefler, Inquirer Staff Writer
Among the 15,400 artifacts Temple University archaeology students unearthed at Timbuctoo - a buried village of freed and runaway slaves along Rancocas Creek - was a tiny, cast-iron buffalo. "There was also a little gun and a wagon wheel, all of which might have been part of a bank set" for a child to collect coins, said Patricia Markert, a Temple student who helped manage the school's field project in 2010 and 2011 and then conducted several smaller digs last year. The final batch of artifacts - including tiny pieces of glass from bottles found up to two feet below the surface - are being washed, analyzed, and catalogued, Markert said while photographing the historical site in Westampton Township, Burlington County, last week as part of her study.
NEWS
August 6, 2014 | BY MORGAN ZALOT, Daily News Staff Writer zalotm@phillynews.com, 215-854-5928
THE YOUNG woman who befriended Tiffany on the Internet seemed innocent enough - so in the midst of a rough patch with her father, the 16-year-old Northeast Philadelphia girl let her new cyber-friend pick her up at home. When she got into the taxi on that fateful day in January 2006, Tiffany didn't know that she was stepping into a dark underworld of violence, drugs and sex slavery. The seemingly normal young woman she'd met on MySpace.com delivered her into the hands of Rahiim McIntyre, 36, a now-convicted violent sex trafficker who awaits sentencing in federal prison.
NEWS
July 30, 2014 | By Jessica Parks, Inquirer Staff Writer
Neighbors opposing the proposed demolition of the William Penn Inn in Lower Merion presented information Monday suggesting that the building might have harbored runaway slaves. At a meeting of the township Historical Commission, a resident of the inn showed photographs of a trapdoor panel and a hiding place between the second and third floors. Gerald A. Francis, president of the Lower Merion Historical Society, said it would be nearly impossible to prove that runaways passed through, but "it would make sense" given its location near other known safe houses.
NEWS
June 20, 2014 | BY DYLAN SEGELBAUM, Daily News Staff Writer segelbd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5917
TO AVOID being sent back to a plantation in Maryland, Charity Castle had to sue for her freedom. A slave owned by Philadelphia's prominent Chew family, Castle had hurt herself in a mysterious fall and argued she couldn't go back. She lost in court. What later became of her is unknown. Castle's story is one of many documented in the Chew family papers, the basis of a new dramatic production at Mount Airy's Cliveden historical estate, where she once worked. Tonight and tomorrow, the New Freedom Theatre will give a glimpse into members of the Chew family and the slaves and indentured servants who worked for them.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2014 | By Jim Rutter, For The Inquirer
In The Most Spectacularly Lamentable Trial of Miz Martha Washington , Philadelphia actor-playwright James Ijames has crafted a superbly written, emotionally compelling, and morally challenging play. How challenging? About halfway through his 80-minute one-act, I no longer wanted to review it. The play begins at the bedside of Martha Washington (Nancy Boykin) some years after George Washington's death. His will provided that their mutually held slaves be emancipated once she died.
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