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Slave

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NEWS
February 21, 2010 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
He was one of the first great chefs of Philadelphia - in fact, of the young nation. The chief cook in President George Washington's home here in 1790 had only one name: Hercules. In the mansion's open-hearth kitchen, where elaborate banquets were prepared, where spitted meats sizzled and "fricaseys" simmered in cast-iron pans over hickory fires, underlings scurried to execute the orders of Hercules, "the great master-spirit," according to one account, who seemed to be everywhere at once.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1989 | By Desmond Ryan, Inquirer Movie Critic
Caleb Deschanel's haunting new version of the story of Robinson Crusoe arrives today with a conspicuous absentee that makes this a weekend without Friday. As soon as the storm-tossed vessel founders on the reef, we realize that one of the rats deserting the sinking ship in Crusoe is none other than Crusoe himself. Deschanel has moved Daniel Defoe's timeless consideration of man, nature and civilization forward by a century and turned Crusoe into an American slave-trader. In this revisionist reading, Crusoe is an unsympathetic figure forced by adversity and circumstances to reconsider his moral failings.
NEWS
January 31, 2008 | By Walter T. Bowne
As an English teacher, I reencounter my "frugality heroes" every year. When Ben Franklin quotes Proverbs 22:7, "The borrower is slave to the lender," in The Way to Wealth, I not only listen - I obey. But not many Americans do. It's the dream, of course, to buy Versailles on a corner lot with three-car garages, turrets, atriums, and cathedral ceilings. In contrast, my house is a twin on a postage-lot, but my two daughters each have a bedroom and share a bathroom. With recession warnings, I'm quite happy with my $702 mortgage.
NEWS
March 7, 2014
PERHAPS it's not a big surprise that "12 Years a Slave," the acclaimed movie based on the true story of a free black man who was sold into slavery in the 1840s, won the Academy Award for best picture. It had already won critical acclaim and praise for its lead actors, director and writer (all of whom were nominated for Oscars as well). Besides, as Ellen DeGeneres, the host of the show, joked at the beginning of the evening, Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences voters had only two options: Either they could bestow their highest honor on "12 Years a Slave," or they were all racists.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Shhh. Listen closely. Do you hear faraway waves slapping against a ship? What about the faint chattering of children? Do you hear anything anymore about the vessel that disturbed the waters off West Africa, whose cargo was children sold into slavery? No? Such silence is unacceptable. Two months have passed since a brief international spotlight fell on a ship called the Etireno, turned away by two nations because it was being used for child trafficking. The world waited to see whether the ship would be found, whether the children aboard were safe.
NEWS
December 12, 2001 | By Bethany Klein FOR THE INQUIRER
Britney Spears paid a visit to the First Union Center on Monday night, and the runway show did not disappoint. The pop princess opened with a beguiling little number in sequined black, reminiscent of an Elvis jumpsuit, but showing more skin than the King would have dared. Sequins were the theme of the concert, delicately balanced by an abundance of midriff and cleavage. Halfway through the collection, Spears paraded around in a hat that easily could have doubled as a dark-chocolate cake topped with strawberry frosting.
NEWS
August 29, 1993 | By Henri Sault, INQUIRER COINS WRITER
A collection of rare slave hire badges and an extensive gathering of colonial coinage will be highlights of the Stack's auction Sept. 8 and 9 at the Park Central Hotel, Seventh Avenue at 56th Street, during the New York Numismatic Convention. The appearance of 14 slave hire badges are a graphic reminder of the practice of urban slave owners who hired out slaves for work as maids, fishermen, mechanics, carpenters and fruit sellers. Several Southern cities passed ordinances governing the practice, and many required the slaves to wear hire tags.
NEWS
April 14, 1999 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 20-year-old woman sighed in relief, then sobbed into the shoulder of her boyfriend. She had just watched a jury convict David Pepe, a security guard, of making her his "sex slave" for three days in his Kensington home in December 1997. The panel deliberated for only 45 minutes. After yesterday's verdict on charges of rape, involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, kidnapping and related offenses, Common Pleas Judge Renee Cardwell Hughes deferred sentencing until tomorrow.
NEWS
October 25, 2013 | BY GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer thompsg@phillynews.com, 215-854-5992
UNDER THE heading Better Late Than Never: "12 Years a Slave" finally gives America a definitive movie on its peculiar institution. One could chastise Hollywood for being overdue, except that this movie isn't very Hollywood. British director Steve McQueen migrated to movies from the art world, and that's significant, because Hollywood, with its entertainment imperative ("Gone with the Wind"), has seemed to lack the language to properly explain the historic monstrosity that is slavery.
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NEWS
August 13, 2016
ISSUE | SLAVERY A link to ancestors When we think of America's slaves, we usually imagine abused Africans and their descendants toiling on a Southern plantation - not in Philadelphia. A few blocks from Independence Hall, slaves disembarked from ships and were brought to the London Coffee House near Front and Market Streets in the mid-1700s to be sold at auction. Last week at Penn's Landing, the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission added a marker recognizing the city's role in the importing and selling of these slaves.
NEWS
May 30, 2016 | By Ellen Gray, TV Critic
The first job of any remake is to justify itself. Why do we need a new version of Roots , the beloved 1977 ABC mini-series whose finale more than 100 million people watched and whose most recent rerun - in high-definition on TV One - was only last fall? Because the world has changed enough in 39 years to justify more sophisticated writing and better production values, but not enough to make Roots any less relevant. Our understanding of the history underlying Roots has changed, too, though not in ways that hurt the History Channel's four-night version, which premieres at 9 p.m. Memorial Day and will be simulcast on A&E and Lifetime.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2016 | By Toby Zinman, For The Inquirer
Where to begin? A knockout production of An Octoroon , by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins and directed mightily by Joanna Settle, has just opened at the Wilma Theater. Well, it's not exactly by Jacobs-Jenkins, but rather radically reimagined and adapted from a 19th-century melodrama by Dion Boucicault called The Octoroon . So this is a contemporary play - note the An in the title rather than The - about theater history. Boucicault's play is about slaves on a plantation in the Deep South - this is Tara territory - and is thus about racial injustice (radical in itself, since the original play predates the Emancipation Proclamation)
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By A.D. Amorosi, For the Daily News
Stoutsburg Cemetery - in Skillman, N.J., at the heel of the Sourland Mountains - has long served as an African American burial ground. Like many such places, it holds much unspoken history. Two trustees of the Stoutsburg Cemetery Association are unraveling those secrets - the stories behind unmarked slave graves around the cemetery - for a book to be published next year. Purchased in 1858 for people of color, Stoutsburg became the final resting place for local residents, including veterans of conflicts dating to the American Revolution.
NEWS
February 18, 2016 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Staff Writer
For African American families searching for their genealogical history, the 1870 census has been both a beacon illuminating the past and a dead end. It was the first time that former slaves were listed as individuals in the government population count. Before then, records were scant and scattered. The three Graham siblings of Chester - Chrishon, 19; Antoine, 17; and Al'lyssa, 15 - are among thousands of volunteers nationwide working to unearth elusive clues that will allow millions of families to trace their ancestors back through Reconstruction and into slavery.
NEWS
February 14, 2016 | By Chris Palmer, Staff Writer
At first she didn't want to be a prostitute. Living on her own after running away from a Frankford group home, the 13-year-old didn't need the money when she first hit the streets. She bounced from house to house in the summer, sometimes sleeping in the back of a neighborhood store. But life got harder in the winter. She needed cash and a more permanent place to live. So she called a pimp - and her whole life seemed to collapse. "I felt like a slave," she said Friday, her voice a monotone.
NEWS
January 10, 2016 | By Caitlin McCabe, Staff Writer
A 42-year-old Bucks County man faces charges of soliciting sex with a minor after allegedly traveling to meet with a person he believed was a 13-year-old girl, the Pennsylvania Attorney General's Office said Friday. David Chandler of Telford was arrested Wednesday after sending explicit messages online indicating he wanted a "sex slave," authorities said. Posing as a 13-year-old girl, an agent within the Attorney General's Office responded to a Craigslist advertisement Chandler allegedly posted seeking sex. The two communicated for more than a month, court records show, during which Chandler requested repeatedly for the pair to meet as he used his girlfriend's computer to communicate.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2016 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Staff Writer
Last season, ABC proved it could outmatch FX and HBO when it came to the anthology drama, with the superb first season of American Crime . The second season premieres at 10 p.m. Wednesday. Unlike HBO's True Detective , which reached dizzying heights of sublimity in its freshman year only to crash and burn in mediocrity the following season, American Crime returns with an equally powerful, compelling, and intelligent story. Created, written, and directed by Oscar-winning writer John Ridley ( 12 Years a Slave )
NEWS
November 20, 2015 | Drew Lazor, Daily News
Before she was an African-American studies scholar, a history professor or a Ph.D. in African diaspora studies, Kelley Deetz was a cook, so it makes sense that she still gravitates toward the kitchen. It always ends up being the most interesting room in the house - even when the house is 250-some years old, hasn't seen an active ladle in a lifetime and is better equipped for an archaeological dig than a fancy dinner party. A Northern California native now relocated to the southern side of the Mason-Dixon, Dr. Deetz chronicles the legacy of slavery on-campus at the University of Virginia, where she is the research associate for the President's Commission on Slavery and the University.
NEWS
October 30, 2015 | BY DAN GERINGER, Daily News Staff Writer geringd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5961
JOSEPH McGILL will spend tonight sleeping where slaves once slept in the Germantown kitchen of 18th-century Cliveden mansion. Tomorrow at 7 p.m., McGill will do what he has done after spending more than 100 nights in former slave quarters in 15 states. He'll talk with the public about "The Slave Dwelling Project," his one-man effort to preserve the scarce, forgotten remains of America's slavery history. "We tend to want to preserve the nice, beautiful homes and tell the nice, beautiful stories of, usually, white men," McGill said.
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