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Slave Trade

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NEWS
April 14, 1995 | By Jack McKinney
The Arab slavers are at it again. While a small, shrill claque of urban academics in this country heightens racial tension by falsely accusing Jews of guilt in the 19th Century slave trade, the predators who were first responsible for delivering black Africans into bondage are doing it again in the Sudan. In that ethnically riven country, Arabs from the North have resumed their old ways by swooping down on non-Muslim blacks of the South to sell them as slaves to oil-rich idlers in the oligarchies of the Persian Gulf.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2001 | By JAMI BERNARD New York Daily News
The abominations of the African slave trade are given a fresh eye in the controversial drama "Adanggaman," the first film to address the sore subject of African complicity in the capturing and selling of their own neighbors. Ivory Coast filmmaker Roger Gnoan M'Bala has created a portrait of great immediacy based on historical fact. The setting is West Africa of the 17th century, where petty tyrant Adanggaman (Rasmane Ouedraogo) sends his minions to raid neighboring villages for slave material.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | Reviewed by Kenneth J. Cooper
Coffee-table books are supposed to be heavy, on photos and in pounds. This latest history of black life in America by Henry Louis Gates Jr. is both, with more than 750 photos on nearly 500 pages. But it offers something more: The distinguished Harvard University professor packs intellectual heft around the pictures. His book updates black history with recent scholarly research, from detailed estimates of the human cargo during the Atlantic slave trade to the DNA test proving almost conclusively that Thomas Jefferson fathered at least one child by his slave Sally Hemings.
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Can you invest to do well financially and do good at the same time? Socially responsible investing dates back more than 2,000 years. Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam and Christianity all took a stance against usury - or charging borrowers excessive lending fees - as early as 600 B.C. By the 1700s, the Quaker Philadelphia Yearly Meeting restricted members from engaging in the slave trade, and John Wesley, a founder of Methodism, preached against...
NEWS
April 21, 2001 | By Cynthia Tucker
In the summer of 1996, two Baltimore journalists went to Africa - to the war-torn, sun-scorched and desperate country of Sudan - to buy a slave. They had little trouble making the transaction. Slavery has been commonplace in Sudan for decades, collateral damage from a vicious civil war. The journalists bought two boys for about $1,000 and returned them to their grateful father. The two journalists - an African-American columnist and a white foreign correspondent for The Baltimore Sun - might have expected their stories about the Sudanese slave trade to provoke howls of outrage and protest from Americans, especially African-Americans.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Hatboro Summer Fun Festival and Carnival continues at Miller Meadow through Memorial Day, where families can have fun while supporting a good cause. There will be rides, games, musical performances, and other activities. Gates open Friday at 6 p.m. and the evening will culminate with a fireworks show. Saturday through Memorial Day, carnival gates open at 2 p.m. On Sunday at 6, a Hatboro's Got Talent showcase is open to all ages, with prizes or cash awards. Proceeds from the carnival will benefit the Enterprise Fire Company of Hatboro and the revitalization project of Elm Street Hatboro.
NEWS
August 30, 1987 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
They were unctuous words from the Southern planter. He had come to Philadelphia, acknowledged delegate Charles Cotesworth Pinckney of South Carolina, with certain "prejudices" against Northern states. But having grown to understand those states' commercial problems and lately seeing their "liberal conduct toward the views of South Carolina," he told the Federal Convention yesterday that that had changed his mind. Now, he said, he found their representatives "as liberal and candid as any men whatever.
NEWS
August 23, 1987 | By Michael E. Ruane, Inquirer Staff Writer
The man from South Carolina had put it in naked terms. "Religion and humanity had nothing to do with this question," John Rutledge had said gravely the day before yesterday. "Interest, alone, is the governing principle. " The "question" before the Federal Convention yesterday was perhaps the stickiest one it has faced all summer: slavery, specifically the importation of slaves, and a section in Article Seven of the proposed constitution that would prohibit taxing or limiting such imports.
NEWS
September 7, 2001
SHAME on you, Signe. Your cartoon on the U.N. World Conference Against Racism, Racial Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerance (Sept. 5) was way off the mark. The conference is not a contrived event for African countries to throw unwarranted bombs at the U.S. and other Western countries. The countries that have benefited from the slave trade are finally being addressed by the countries that had their citizens stolen, their lands colonized and their natural resources taken.
NEWS
April 26, 2008
MINISTER Rodney Muhammad isn't very convincing in saying that the Nation of Islam is not a hate group ("Hate Group? No, Just Hated," op-ed, April 10). The Nation of Islam, since its founding in the 1930s, has maintained a consistent record of racism and anti-Semitism under the guise of instilling African-Americans with a sense of empowerment. Under the guidance of Louis Farrakhan, who has expressed anti-Semitic and racist rhetoric for nearly 30 years as the NOI's leader, the organization has used its programs, institutions and publications to disseminate its message of hate.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 11, 2015 | By Erin E. Arvedlund, Inquirer Columnist
Can you invest to do well financially and do good at the same time? Socially responsible investing dates back more than 2,000 years. Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam and Christianity all took a stance against usury - or charging borrowers excessive lending fees - as early as 600 B.C. By the 1700s, the Quaker Philadelphia Yearly Meeting restricted members from engaging in the slave trade, and John Wesley, a founder of Methodism, preached against...
NEWS
June 29, 2013 | Associated Press
GOREE ISLAND, Senegal - Soon after being released from his 27-year incarceration in South Africa, antiapartheid icon Nelson Mandela made a pilgrimage to this small island off the Senegalese coast. He came to pay homage to a salmon-colored house which locals claim was used to hold slaves before herding them onto ships bound for America. When the curator showed him a hole underneath the staircase used to punish disobedient slaves, who were left to die in the crawlspace, Mandela himself climbed in. He reemerged, his face wet with tears, says Eloi Coly, the museum's chief conservator, who recalled the impact the experience had on Mandela, just hours before showing the building to President Obama.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Monica Peters, For The Inquirer
The Hatboro Summer Fun Festival and Carnival continues at Miller Meadow through Memorial Day, where families can have fun while supporting a good cause. There will be rides, games, musical performances, and other activities. Gates open Friday at 6 p.m. and the evening will culminate with a fireworks show. Saturday through Memorial Day, carnival gates open at 2 p.m. On Sunday at 6, a Hatboro's Got Talent showcase is open to all ages, with prizes or cash awards. Proceeds from the carnival will benefit the Enterprise Fire Company of Hatboro and the revitalization project of Elm Street Hatboro.
NEWS
February 18, 2013 | By Maddie Hanna, Inquirer Staff Writer
As the nation's first president, George Washington led a young country that had declared "all men are created equal," yet owned 300 slaves, gave slave owners the legal right to recover their runaways, and skirted a Pennsylvania law providing for gradual abolition by sending some of his slaves to Virginia. That dichotomy, at the heart of the President's House exhibit at Independence Mall, was on the minds of those touring the site Sunday on the eve of the federal holiday honoring all U.S. presidents.
NEWS
January 20, 2013 | Reviewed by Mike Fischer
Searching for Zion By Emily Raboteau Atlantic Monthly. 305 pp. $25   In Harlem Is Nowhere , her incisive and moving study of what she calls "the Mecca of Black America," Sharifa Rhodes-Pitts describes African Americans' longing for a never-known homeland as "the melancholy that compels us all: a yearning for the past from which our ancestors were irrevocably torn. " That same yearning consumes Emily Raboteau, whose African American grandfather was shot dead in 1943 Mississippi "for defending a black woman to a white man. " While Raboteau admits that she'd grown up with "advantages up the wazoo" - in the sheltered Princeton world where her father is a professor - she also tells us that "as a consequence of growing up half white in a nation divided along racial lines, I had never felt at home in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2012 | BY Felicia D'Ambrosio and For the Daily News
ON SUNDAY at noon, a crowd expected to number in the thousands will flow from 23rd and South streets to the banks of the Schuylkill, where the participants will ask Oshun, the orisha, or spirit of the river, for her blessings as they make offerings of fruit, flowers and song. This is the heart of Odunde, Philadelphia's festive observance of the African New Year that originated with the Yoruba people of Nigeria and their monotheistic religion, Ifa. Orishas are venerated just like the saints of the Catholic church; Sunday's ceremony will praise all 401, especially Oshun, who represents beauty, vanity and sensuality.
NEWS
December 30, 2011 | By Suzanne Gamboa, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Almost two centuries before there was a man named Obama in the White House, there was a man named Obama shackled in the bowels of a slave ship. There is no proof that the unidentified Obama has ties to President Obama. All they share is a name. But that is exactly the commonality that Emory University researchers hope to build upon as they delve into the origins of Africans who were taken up and sold. They have built an online database around those names - http://www.african-origins.org/ - and welcome input from people who may share a name that is in the database, or have such names as part of their family lore.
NEWS
December 2, 2011 | By Douglas Pike
First you see terrified eyes peering from inside a shipping crate. Then the camera zooms in on the half-dozen people trapped inside it. A forklift is carrying this human six-pack toward a truck, which is likely headed for a factory, a farm, or a brothel. The new MTV public-service ad dramatizes a hidden horror: slavery in the 21st century. Millions of women, men, and children - including many thousands in the United States - are slaves. Their forced labor includes picking crops, weaving carpets, cleaning buildings, and being raped.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 2011 | Reviewed by Kenneth J. Cooper
Coffee-table books are supposed to be heavy, on photos and in pounds. This latest history of black life in America by Henry Louis Gates Jr. is both, with more than 750 photos on nearly 500 pages. But it offers something more: The distinguished Harvard University professor packs intellectual heft around the pictures. His book updates black history with recent scholarly research, from detailed estimates of the human cargo during the Atlantic slave trade to the DNA test proving almost conclusively that Thomas Jefferson fathered at least one child by his slave Sally Hemings.
NEWS
August 11, 2010
Leonard Pitts Jr. is way off base in "Keeping faith, losing religion" (Sunday). He critiques organized religion in general and Christianity in particular in the easiest but most unfair and unbalanced way. If you want to discredit something, cite a long list of its failures without mentioning any of its positive features. For example, Pitts makes the sweeping statement that Christianity "has traded moral authority for political power. " It has become "a wholly owned subsidiary of the Republican Party.
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