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Slave

NEWS
August 14, 1992 | By WILLIAM RASPBERRY
After all these re-enactments, the pageant still gets to me: Young Simon, perhaps 12 years old, on a forced march from Virginia to Kentucky, watching in helpless horror as his mother, several months pregnant, stumbles again and falls. The boy turns to help her, but is ordered back in line - ordered to leave the dearest person in the world to him to die like a dog on the trail. It's the last time Simon - my great grandfather - ever sees his mother. He never even knew her name.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
The 20-year-old former "sex slave" of a now 72-year-old man asked the judge to "punish him for what he did to me. " "I didn't like what he did to me," she sighed yesterday. Alfredo Rodriguez, of Watkins Street near 4th, looked straight ahead, rubbing his chin. He said nothing. Common Pleas Judge Anthony J. DeFino then sentenced Rodriguez to three to six years in prison for rape and a series of other charges. "Just because he's 72 years old, I'm not going to give him a slap on the wrist and say go home," DeFino said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1988 | By Douglas J. Keating, Inquirer Staff Writer
Granville Burgess clearly remembers how he came to write Dusky Sally, the play that opens Wednesday at the Walnut Street Theater. "I was visiting some people and I said, 'I've got to write another play now. Does anyone have any ideas? A woman said, 'What about a play about Sally Hemings?' And I said, 'Who?' " The woman explained that Hemings was a slave who was Thomas Jefferson's mistress for 38 years. "I said, 'Wait a minute. I majored in American history and I never heard of this woman.
NEWS
September 12, 1990 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Louis Seymour donated two dozen oranges. Six-year-old Jerusha Bustill gave her entire savings, 32 pennies. Abolitionist leader Lucretia Mott donated a turkey, four mince pies, cabbages and turnips. These modest gifts are among dozens listed in the 1866 annual Managers' Report of the Home for Aged and Infirm Colored Persons at Front and Pine streets. It was a typically lean year for the first and only old age home in Philadelphia for elderly blacks. Relocated in 1871 to a larger, new building in West Philadelphia and re- named the Stephen Smith Home in 1953, hard times never really ended for this historic institution.
NEWS
January 21, 1993 | By Susan Weidener and Connie Langland, FOR THE INQUIRER
In the end, all concerned agreed it was a black history lesson that went badly awry: Two 6-year-olds, the only black children in a first-grade class at rural Octorara Elementary in Chester County, were summoned to the front of the classroom earlier this week and asked to pretend that they were slaves on the auction block. "Teacher put us up on a table. Acted like she was selling us," said Ashley Dixon of Parkesburg. Ashley said the teacher, Mary Horning, told her that, as a slave, she would be sold for about $10 as a house cleaner.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 29, 1998 | By Clifford A. Ridley, INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The life of Sojourner Truth, the 19th-century abolitionist born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree, would seem to yield dramatic material enough for several plays - which makes it especially disappointing that half a play is the best that Sojourner, the one-woman show on view at the Bushfire Theatre of Performing Arts, can muster. It's a reasonably absorbing half a play, however. In the anteroom of a New York City auditorium, playwright Richard LaMonte Pierce introduces his heroine at age 86, preparing to deliver what would be the final lecture of her life.
NEWS
February 5, 2008 | By Kita Sullivan INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
With his African American Lives 2, Harvard professor Henry Louis Gates Jr. has found just the right place to nestle African American history between scholarship and drama. This four-part PBS series, which debuts tomorrow night with the first two episodes and concludes Feb. 13 with the remaining two, combines genealogical research and cutting-edge analysis to help a group of well-known African Americans, including Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Morgan Freeman, Tina Turner, Maya Angelou and Don Cheadle, trace their roots to Africa and Europe.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | By Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writer
Robert Isaiah Fassett, 105, the son of a former slave who fought for the Union Army during the Civil War, died Wednesday at Bryn Mawr Hospital. He had lived in the Philadelphia area since 1900 and spent the last 10 years in Rosemont, Delaware County. Mr. Fassett, a retired foundry worker, was born in Berlin, Md., on July 4, 1883, and was always mindful of the sacrifices of veterans such as his father. "He was very proud of his father," said Marlene Dawson, Mr. Fassett's daughter.
NEWS
September 9, 1993 | By Rhonda Goodman, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Folklorist Sparky Rucker makes his living performing history through stories and songs. At a recent stop at Ursinus College, in a workshop and in his new show, "Conceived in Liberty," Rucker led a journey through American history - from Native Americans through the Salem witch trials to the Civil War, with discussions about Thomas Jefferson, George Washington, slave-ship captain John Newton (the author of "Amazing Grace") and other famous figures. Songs accompany each story to amplify past dilemmas, Rucker said.
NEWS
April 25, 2001
The people of Mississippi are right. America needs at least one state to keep proudly displaying a symbol of the Confederacy. Sure, some comments in the aftermath of last week's vote to retain a rebel symbol on the state flag make the blood run cold. A Sons of Confederate Veterans leader was quoted as saying, "Our state has withstood yet another unbelievable assault on its culture by a few of its own citizens and other outside influences. " As if "outside influences" - that would be other Americans - should apologize for their assault on Mississippi's slave culture in the 1860s.
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