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Slave

NEWS
November 5, 1998 | By Matt Stearns, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
These days, William Pickens 3d doesn't see Thomas Jefferson as much of a role model. Instead, the descendant of another colonial-era interracial union - this one in Cheltenham, not at Monticello - thinks his own ancestors knew the proper way of handling the offspring of such a pairing. Tonight at Beaver College, Pickens will give a public lecture on how the union in the 1700s between local aristocrat Richard Morrey and one of his father's former slaves helped build, near what is now Limekiln Pike and Church Road, one of the earliest African American communities in the American colonies.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1998 | By Carrie Rickey, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
Oprah Winfrey could remember singing the hymn at the Baptist Church in Kosciusko, Miss., where she was raised. And before I'll be a slave I'll be buried in my grave And go home to the Lord and be free. But it wasn't until the producer and star of Beloved was in character as Sethe, the runaway slave who will stop at nothing to prevent her children from being returned to the plantation, that she understood. Understood in her very marrow that, having tasted the honey of freedom, no how, no way could she have swallowed the curdled milk of oppression again.
LIVING
February 4, 2000 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the antebellum South, the land of the free was also the home of the enslaved. During the greater part of the 19th century, African Americans had no identity, no rights, and very few, if any, ways to express their cultural and creative selves. For the vast number of African American cabinetmakers, potters, quilters, basket makers and blacksmiths, work became the outlet for such expression. Not only did the skills of those slave artisans help to build a nation, but their contributions to American craft also created a historical and artistic legacy that is just starting to get recognition.
NEWS
February 19, 1997 | By Larry Copeland, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The memory still irks Carl Galmon, a straight-talking, no-nonsense veteran of the civil rights movement. A group of black boys and girls - the McDonogh 35 High School marching band - strutted along St. Charles Avenue, styling and profiling in the Mardi Gras parade. As they high-stepped and moved to the music, their colors and uniforms paid proud tribute to their school - named for one of the largest slave owners in Louisiana history. "As they were passing, these people standing near me, I guess they were tourists, said, 'Is this school named after John McDonogh?
LIVING
October 16, 1998 | By Diane Goldsmith, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It wasn't the kind of thing you'd leave lying around the house, this iron collar with the ugly curved hooks. But as assistant to the propmaster for the movie Beloved, Kia Steave-Dickerson had been asked to find and forge the slave artifact - and, after filming, she kept the fabricated prop as a memento. Perhaps the fact that such devices were a century-plus removed from use had rendered the collar "a part of history" for the Philadelphia designer - but she did feel kinship with the pain it evoked.
NEWS
March 23, 2001 | By Linda K. Harris INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the 1950s, when the bells of the historic First African Baptist Church rang 96 feet above this corner in South Philadelphia, the neighborhood was filled with prosperous African Americans, and the church itself, 2,000 members strong, would crowd to overflowing on Sundays. Mabel R. Taylor, 96, is the oldest of the 100 or so faithful who remain. She remembers well the joy of watching the sun glint through the many stained-glass windows, and she recalls the glory of the chimes. "I have really enjoyed that church," said Taylor, who lives in Germantown.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2011 | By Shaun Brady, For The Inquirer
Despite a keen interest in African American history, Warren Oree had never heard of the violent standoff that came to be known as the Christiana riot. Then Oree came upon a two-sentence summary of the 1851 confrontation, which involved three escaped slaves, a strong-willed free black man, and a slave owner intent on retrieving his property. That was enough to spark the bassist/composer's curiosity. "I don't knock the Underground Railroad," Oree says, "but for too long African Americans have been pictured as either running away or cowering, and that's not a true picture.
NEWS
December 13, 1998
"There are many of us African Americans who absolutely reject the great myth of white/Jewish superiority. We are the superior people! . . . They are not there because they love or care about our children! They are there because oppressors need to oppress! . . . The sons and daughters of slave-traders and slave owners/masters should absolutely not be expected, nor trusted, to effectively teach and generally work to uplift the lot of the sons and daughters of former slaves. " Excerpt from a letter sent in January by Marvin A. Smith to Ella Travis, principal of George Washington Carver High School.
TRAVEL
July 31, 2011 | By Jesse J. Holland, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - In the Confederate circles he navigated, John Scobell was considered just another Mississippi slave: singing, shuffling, illiterate, and ignorant of the Civil War going on around him. Confederate officers thought nothing of leaving important documents where Scobell could see them, or discussing troop movements in front of him. Whom would he tell? Scobell was only the butler, or the deckhand on a rebel sympathizer's steamboat, or the field hand belting out Negro spirituals in a powerful baritone.
NEWS
February 12, 2004 | By Jessica M. Stein
For years, my children asked questions whenever we walked past the jockey on a neighbor's lawn. The three-foot-high statue - dressed in white shirt and pants and a red vest - looked like a tiny slave holding a lantern, waiting patiently to be of service. "Why is that statue black, Mom?" the children asked. Finally, last fall I decided to broach the subject. I introduced myself to the homeowner, said I was a neighbor, and politely asked whether she would consider painting the statue in Caucasian skin tones.
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