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Slavery

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NEWS
August 1, 2008
I BELIEVE I'm entitled to reparations for having to read yet another letter on slavery. At what point do some folks in the African-American community embrace the glorious possibilities of their lives today? Scott Wolf Philadelphia
NEWS
June 13, 2005 | By JEFF JACOBY
AS SOON as he learned the ugly truth, the chairman of financial-services giant Wachovia Corp. issued a remorseful nostra culpa. "We are deeply saddened by these findings," Ken Thompson said. "I apologize to all Americans, and especially to African-Americans. " Wachovia acknowledged that it "cannot change the past or atone for the harm that was done. " But it promised to make amends by subsidizing the work of organizations involved in "furthering awareness and education of African-American history.
NEWS
June 13, 2007
I THANK Michael Smerconish for spreading the word (May 31) about the archaeological dig at the President's House site at 6th and Market, where George Washington presided from 1790- 1797 with nine of his 316 enslaved Africans from Mount Vernon. Smerconish correctly noted that the dig recently uncovered partial foundations of the bow window, the prototype for today's Oval Office. But in regard to the partial foundations of the walls of the kitchen, he is incorrect in noting that the kitchen had a basement so those blacks could move between it and the main house "without going outside.
NEWS
June 14, 2005
RE COUNCILMAN Goode's response to my letter on the slavery-disclosure ordinance: I agree that it was wrong to use slaves as collateral for loans and investments. Slavery was wrong and disgraceful. But the councilman still fails to tell how these disclosures will address discrimination. What do any current discriminatory practices by these institutions have to do with what happened hundreds of years ago? Can't they be investigated for what they are doing now? If I am being investigated for embezzlement, do you also investigate my great-great-great-grandfather?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 1992 | By Robert G. Seidenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
From the perspective of the late 20th century, the most intriguing aspect of Abraham Lincoln's rise to political power is the combination of his eloquent moralism against the extension of slavery to the Western territories with his willingness to tolerate it in the South. In his 1861 inaugural address, for example, in an effort to save the Union, Lincoln even endorsed a constitutional amendment forbidding Congress from interfering with slavery in the states. The states that had seceded, however, were unimpressed.
NEWS
July 12, 2008
RE MINISTER Meritazon's recent op-ed on reparations: First off, sir, study your history before sticking your hand out for something no one alive today was responsible for that happened 300 years ago. The rich African war lords enslaved their own people, then figured a way to make even more money by selling them to anyone willing to pay. Second, don't you know that men, women and children are still forced into slavery every day in...
NEWS
August 15, 2002
Re "Multicultural congress pushes for slave memorial at Liberty Bell" (article Aug. 9): A memorial on Independence Mall commemorating those who were enslaved at our first president's Morris Mansion is most suitable. It will also serve as a bridge to the century of slavery in the City of Brotherly Love way before George Washington brought his menservants from Virginia to Philadelphia right after the creation of the American presidency. The truth about slavery in Philadelphia is too often buried.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 12, 2016 | By Karen Warrington
  I am a grandmother of a 22-year-old college student, a black male. Many times over breakfast, I have tried to get him to read a story in the local newspaper. Sometimes he will give it a glance, but usually his attention is on his phone. Thursday morning, he pulled me into his telephone world. He showed me the story of the Twin Cities police shooting of Philando Castile and his girlfriend's wrenching account of sitting next to her dying boyfriend. The story had not yet made print media, but social media had taken the story around the world in moments.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Rahim Islam
"We're going to rebuild our inner cities, which are absolutely a shame and so sad. We're going to take care of our African-American people that have been mistreated for so long. " - Donald Trump, June 7, 2016 I AM on record for attacking Trump for some of the most bigoted and racist statements he has made over the course of this presidential election; however, if he says something of extreme importance that acknowledges the plight of the African-American community, I have a moral obligation to respond to that, as well.
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Dan Geringer, Staff Writer
Daisy Century's electrifying reenactment of Harriet Tubman, the death-defying 19th-century abolitionist who led hundreds of slaves to freedom, highlighted Sunday's Juneteenth celebration at St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Elkins Park. Juneteenth celebrates June 19, 1865, when Union soldiers enforced President Lincoln's 1863 Emancipation Proclamation in Texas, freeing its 250,000 slaves and signaling the end of slavery in the United States. St. Paul's, at 7809 Old York Rd., is a self-described "deliberately multicultural church.
NEWS
May 9, 2016
Allen C. Guelzo is a professor of history at Gettysburg College They had just glued the world back together, and within a year it was threatening to come apart again. That might sound like a description of the Arab Spring, or even the fall of the Soviet Union. In fact, it's what happened 150 years ago in the United States. The Civil War had been brought to a close, slavery abolished, and the American Union restored. Sort of. The problem was that the postwar Reconstruction that followed the collapse of the Confederacy and the death of Abraham Lincoln turned out to be a good deal harder to manage, or even imagine, than anyone had dreamt.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2016 | Anndee Hochman, For The Inquirer
At her family's Passover seder last April, Rabbi Debra Orenstein opted for the layered look: an ordinary T-shirt topped by a purple-and-black blouse made in India - and very likely sewn in a sweatshop by slave labor. At the moment when the seder's leader typically holds up a piece of matzo and declares, "This is the bread of affliction" - symbolizing the ancient Israelites' enslavement and hasty flight from Egypt - Orenstein startled her guests by peeling off the Indian blouse. "This," she announced, "is the shirt of affliction!"
NEWS
April 18, 2016
James Traub is author of "John Quincy Adams: Militant Spirit" (Basic Books) On March 3, 1820, Secretary of State John Quincy Adams and Secretary of War John Calhoun walked down Pennsylvania Avenue after a cabinet meeting devoted to Missouri's application to be admitted to the Union as a slave state - a question that had begun to divide the country. Adams had insisted that the words of the Declaration of Independence - "all men are created equal" - should be construed to prohibit slavery.
NEWS
April 17, 2016
The Other Slavery The Uncovered Story of Indian Enslavement in America By Andrés Reséndez Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 431 pp. $30 Reviewed by Peter Lewis Farmer X lived close by our house. Late Sunday night, he'd drive to town, bail 10 blotto men out of the drunk tank, and truck them to the farm. Next morning, oh, boy, were those men surprised. It took them about 10 days to pay off Farmer X: long hours, squalid housing, painful encounters with yellow jackets.
NEWS
March 20, 2016
The Immortal Irishman The Irish Revolutionary Who Became an American Hero By Timothy Egan Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. 448 pp. $30 Reviewed by Paul Jablow From his earliest years in Ireland to the battlefields of the Civil War to his mysterious death in an icy Montana river, Thomas Francis Meagher was driven by visions of freeing his native Ireland from the yoke of Britain. It was a mirage constantly fading into the horizon. Born to family wealth he easily tossed aside, Meagher had been sentenced in 1848 to hang for revolutionary activities.
NEWS
March 17, 2016 | By Trudy Rubin, Columnist
DOHUK, Iraq - This week I met a young Yazidi woman who escaped after a year's captivity as a slave of ISIS. Haifa's horrifying story reminds me of the misguided debate in Washington over whether to label the effort to destroy the Yazidis (and other Iraqi minorities) a genocide. Congress has set a March 17 deadline for the State Department to make up its mind. By itself this label is of little value to Haifa or to the 2,500 or so other female Yazidi escapees (never mind the thousands who remain enslaved)
NEWS
March 1, 2016
ISSUE | SLAVERY It's here, worldwide Many people believe that slavery was abolished more than 150 years ago. In reality, slavery still exists in countries around the world, including our own ("Janitorial slavery ring nets 20 years," Friday). The International Labor Organization estimates that there are more than 27 million slaves in the world. The Chester County Abolitionists is an anti-human-trafficking advocacy group that fights modern-day slavery in all its forms.
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