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Slippers

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NEWS
January 2, 1998 | by Scott Flander, Daily News Staff Writer
Here's a guide to keeping warm (or trying to) at the Mummers parade, from observations along the parade route in South Philly yesterday. ELECTRIC SOCKS: A cop assigned to work the parade tried this, but he didn't get too far. Knowing the day would be cold (temperatures in the afternoon were mostly in the upper 20s), he spent $10 on a pair of battery-powered socks. But when he tried them on at home, they didn't fit into the shoes that go with his uniform - his feet have gotten bigger over the years.
FOOD
January 19, 1994 | by Anne B. Adams and Nancy Nash-Cummings Special to the Daily News
Dear Anne and Nan: My favorite sheepskin-lined slippers are beginning to show soil. Can you suggest a way to clean them? The outside leather is creamy- gray and resembles suede. Please help. I'm dreading cold feet. - M. Horton, Waverly, N.Y. Put the slippers in your washing machine with the water temperature set on "Cold" and the cycle set on "Delicate. " Add 1/4 cup of Woolite to the wash cycle and then 1/4 cup of hair conditioner or cream rinse to the rinse cycle. This will condition the skin and make your slippers soft and pliable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalog companies of America, I hear you. I'll bet you're right, too. Scotch probably does seem snazzier in cut-crystal glasses bearing my engraved initials. Thanks for the heads-up! And if I order express delivery, those cuff links made from shotgun shells should be here by Christmas - what you folks call "The Holidays. " They'll look great with that pheasant-feather bow tie that you, Orvis, so thoughtfully have urged on me. Is $149 too much for a bow tie? Not when the feathers are "naturally harvested!"
SPORTS
January 4, 1997 | by Phil Jasner, Daily News Sports Writer
The 76ers all have the same agonizing question: How long can this go on? How long can they cling to games by their fingernails and come away empty? How long can they scrape, scrap, scuffle and scramble and leave with nothing more tangible than words of encouragement from their coach? The unfortunate answer: for at least one more game. "It's like going to work and not getting paid," Sixers coach Johnny Davis said after an excruciating 122-114 overtime loss to the Golden State Warriors last night.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2002 | By Marcia Gelbart INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
You might not remember the pink slippers, but you could soon see them on TV, on traveling billboards, and atop New York City taxis. Friday marks the return of a two-for-one Philadelphia weekend hotel deal created last year by regional tourism officials in response to sagging sales after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The advertising campaign promoting the deals - called "Philly's More Fun When You Sleep Over" and featuring the trademark slippers - helped to fill 36,000 hotel rooms here last winter, sustaining bookings at the end of a weak convention year and at an unstable time for the entire tourism industry.
NEWS
March 18, 1998 | For The Inquirer / SHARON GEKOSKI-KIMMEL
Ed Tackett, Cherry Hill's J.F. Copper School principal, got students to read for more than 100,000 minutes in January and February. Yesterday, he paid the price. Students, told they could "challenge" him to do something, had him slide in pajamas (actually sweats) and slippers with a teddy bear. Helping were Leslie Alexander (left), 9, and Kaycie Plessas, 8.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1987 | By MADELINE DAVIS, Daily News Finds Columnist
Camping stores and rugged-wear shops offer splendidly bulky sheepskin slippers guaranteed to keep your feet warm. But donning such footwear with a satin negligee is like wearing a parka with a strapless evening gown. Avoid mixing fashion methaphors with ballet slippers from St. De Milo being sold at Bloomingdale's. The white leather slippers are trimmed with a delicate pink or white ribbon. In sizes 5 to 9, the slippers cost $39. BETTER BET Regulars at blackjack tables in Atlantic City who routinely use trolls, rabbit feet and other charms to improve their luck might try a charm of a different kind.
NEWS
October 25, 1992 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, FOR THE INQUIRER
Question: My mother left me a cobalt glass slipper decorated with a sunburst-in-a-diamond design and a bow and streamers on the front. It is 8 inches from heel to toe and 2 inches wide, 4 inches high at the heel, and weighs 1 1/2 pounds. It's marked: "Registered 64088. " What's its origin and worth? Answer: The registry mark on your English pressed-glass slipper shows that it was made in 1886. Clear crystal diamond-patterned slippers like yours are scarce, colored ones even more rare, said Libby Yalom, author of Shoes of Glass (Antique Publications, $18 postpaid from the Shoe Lady, Box 7146, Adelphi, Md. 20783, phone 301-422-2026)
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 1986 | By JOE O'DOWD, JR., Daily News Staff Writer
The last 3-D movie the Hit Man saw left a lot to be desired. He was subjected to wearing those silly paper glasses, and the movie seemed out of focus, not three dimensional. He left the theater disgruntled and unhappy. This week you can see a bit of moviedom up close, and you don't have to wear silly paper glasses. The "Hollywood on Tour" exhibit, with memorabilia valued at more than $1 million, is at Willow Grove Park and Mall today through Aug. 28. It features a collection of costumes, props and original posters from some of Hollywood's most famous movies.
LIVING
June 17, 2005 | By Denise Cowie INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Not all orchids are hothouse flowers destined to become houseplants. Some can be grown as perennials in the garden in colder regions. Even here. "Think 'orchid' and you think 'tropical,' " says Bill Mathis, a Bucks County scientist-turned-breeder who painstakingly propagates hardy terrestrial orchids. But there are about 200 species of terrestrial orchids native to North America, including some growing wild as far north as Alaska, and scores more from Europe and Asia.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2014 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Catalog companies of America, I hear you. I'll bet you're right, too. Scotch probably does seem snazzier in cut-crystal glasses bearing my engraved initials. Thanks for the heads-up! And if I order express delivery, those cuff links made from shotgun shells should be here by Christmas - what you folks call "The Holidays. " They'll look great with that pheasant-feather bow tie that you, Orvis, so thoughtfully have urged on me. Is $149 too much for a bow tie? Not when the feathers are "naturally harvested!"
NEWS
February 14, 2013
J ENNIFER ROSEN, 28, of Bryn Mawr, owns the Hope Chest lingerie shop at 20th and Chestnut streets. Rosen, a former manager and buyer for the company's flagship Haverford store,opened the Center City boutique in September. It features fine lingerie, sleepwear, shapewear and slippers. Q: What made you decide to step out on your own? A: I always wanted to open my own store but didn't want to totally separate myself from the Hope Chest. I knew there was a niche [in Center City]
ENTERTAINMENT
February 25, 2012 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
I'm checking the mail every day, waiting for a gorgeous ivory envelope of considerable heft to fall out of the mailbox. And there, in perfect script, will be my invitation to the Academy Awards. I deserve it. As someone who papered her childhood room with pictures of movie stars, and who more recently has plunked down unconscionable admission prices to see movies of questionable merit, I think it's payback time. So I stand ready to take my seat at the Kodak Theatre in Los Angeles on Sunday.
NEWS
December 19, 2011 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
Got your Stompeez yet? If not, it's too late. The rainbow-colored children's slippers, shaped like puppies, unicorns, or alligators, with mouths or eyes that open and close, are sold out. That's a fact that Sherri Hope Culver, a Temple University scholar who studies the impact of advertising, regards with a certain professional admiration. The endless holiday rotation of Stompeez TV commercials apparently did its job, enticing kids to crave an odd, previously unknown sort of footwear and parents to plunk down $19.95, plus postage and handling.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2011 | By JENNY BARCHFIELD, Associated Press
MONACO - Charlene Wittstock has not one, but two tough acts to follow. As the future princess of Monaco and wife to longtime bachelor Prince Albert II, the Zimbabwe-born, South Africa-raised former Olympic swimmer is to succeed Grace Kelly, whose 1956 wedding to Prince Rainier III is still widely seen as the gold standard for royal nuptials. And as if the blue-eyed Hollywood beauty-turned-beloved princess didn't cast a long enough shadow, Albert's long-awaited marriage to Wittstock comes on the heels of the royal wedding of the decade, Kate Middleton's union with Britain's Prince William.
NEWS
August 8, 2010 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
They sat row upon row, brown leather sandals and blue plastic flip-flops, size-12 sneakers and shoes so tiny they could fit only a small child. Some had belonged to the people who wore them; others were donated. Each pair was set on the Art Museum steps to symbolize one of the 305 people slain in Philadelphia last year. "Our children and our loved ones, they walked among us," said Shirley Boggs, founder and chief executive officer of Mothers United Through Tragedy, which organized the Saturday-afternoon event.
NEWS
December 12, 2008
CHECK ALMOST any Philadelphia tourist brochure and you'll see a Mummer in New Year's sequins and feathers. Love 'em or hate 'em - and at times, Philadelphians do both - the Mummers are an instantly recognizable symbol of the city. So it makes no kind of sense that Philadelphia would imperil one of its signature attractions by forcing it out of Center City. Just three weeks before the Mummers are scheduled to step onto Broad Street, city government is insisting that they sign a contract obligating them to cover any expenses for the parade that exceed $300,000 in police overtime and sanitation.
NEWS
November 8, 2008 | By Edward Colimore INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Frank Passio was chatting up a new Mummers campaign yesterday that will promote the one-of-a-kind New Year's Day parade with banners hung across Center City. But as he praised the project at the Moorestown company that produced the colorful banners, his cell phone wouldn't stay quiet. There were voice and text messages from the president of one string band, the drill master of another, and a marketing specialist from a third - each person stunned by reports of the city's announcement on Wednesday that it would eliminate its $355,000 contribution to the Mummers.
NEWS
January 1, 2008 | By Jennifer Lin INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the world of mummery, there isn't anyone like Bob Shannon Jr. He's captain of the Quaker City String Band in South Philadelphia. It's not just a job for him; it's a legacy. In 77 years, the band has had just two captains: Ray Endriss and Shannon. Endriss held the post from 1931 to 1971, and Shannon has carried on since. Today, however, Shannon, 59 and a towering 6-foot-10, will end his 37-year reign. His march up Broad Street will be his last as Quaker City's captain.
NEWS
December 30, 2006 | By Christine Schiavo and Toni Callas INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
By noon tomorrow, Bobby Mansure, founder of the Philadelphia Eagles Pep Band, will be in the team's trademark green, revving up the pre-game crowd at Lincoln Financial Field. Assuming a hoped-for victory performance on Comcast SportsNet, he'll perform his final "Fly, Eagles, Fly" of the night on tenor sax seven hours later. At midday Monday, Mansure, a longtime Mummer who marches with the Hegeman String Band, will hit Broad Street in makeup and feathers to play those familiar sing-alongs synonymous with Philadelphia.
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