CollectionsSlot Machine
IN THE NEWS

Slot Machine

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 12, 2005 | By John Sullivan and Mark Fazlollah INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Several politically connected people have been granted the exclusive rights to distribute slot machines in Pennsylvania for Aristocrat Technologies Inc., one of the top slot-machine makers in the world. The company, known as Keystone Gaming Machines (KGM), is the first publicly named Pennsylvania-based distributor of slot machines under a controversial provision that requires slot machine makers to use in-state middlemen. Senate Republicans have criticized the requirement, saying it could be used to reward the politically connected.
NEWS
May 13, 1997
There is no way to make the introduction of thousands of slot machines at Pennsylvania's four racetracks - now being debated in Harrisburg - sound like good public policy. It is not. Racetracks and lotteries are enough for this state. And if racetracks are hurting from competition in neighboring states, there are better ways to help those enterprises - through tax breaks, for instance - than to sell out future generations of would-be gamblers to millions of dollars in losses. Slot machines are among the most addictive forms of gambling.
NEWS
December 13, 2003 | By Nathan Gorenstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Developers are already expressing interest in licenses for two slot-machine parlors that could be located in Center City under the terms of a gambling bill now being negotiated by legislators in Harrisburg. Legislative leaders are trying to finalize a bill and might bring it up for a vote as early as Tuesday. Earlier this week, State Sen. Vincent J. Fumo (D., Phila.) said he and House Speaker John M. Perzel (R., Phila.) had agreed to language that would allow two slot parlors in Philadelphia.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2009 | By Suzette Parmley INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Revenue for the 11 casinos in Atlantic City decreased 9.4 percent in January from the same month a year ago. The casinos generated $321.4 million in total gambling revenue, according to figures released yesterday by the New Jersey Casino Control Commission, which regulates the Atlantic City gaming market. Nearly 66 percent, or $211.6 million, came from slot machines. The remainder, $109.8 million, came from table games. While Atlantic City traditionally sees less business in the slower winter months, the impact of slots competition from Pennsylvania and New York is clear.
SPORTS
March 18, 1997 | by Edward Moran, Daily News Sports Writer
Pennsylvania's horse racing industry is like a casino gambler standing in front of a slot machine with one quarter left and no bus fare home. If the next spin dosn't turn up cherries, it will be out of business. At least that's what state Sen. Robert "Tommy" Tomlinson (R-Bucks) and Philadelphia Park president Bob Green say about the future of the state's race tracks. In an effort to keep the horse racing in Pennsylvania from folding, Tomlinson has reintroduced a bill in the state Legislature that would allow slot-machine gambling at the state's four tracks.
NEWS
February 5, 1986
Atlantic City casinos serve one purpose mostly - you can walk the Boardwalk at anytime now in relative safety with a nice lady. It's a case of safety in numbers. 'Twasn't that way e'en the year before Resorts opened. Also, I have found two dozen uses at home for those plastic slot-machine coin cups - paints, brushes, turpentine, etc. I don't gamble, but the casinos pay my bus fare to Atlantic City. Jack Hughes Bristol.
NEWS
July 26, 1989 | By Rebecca Rubin, Special to The Inquirer
Saying it "would open a Pandora's box of gambling," Gov. Castle yesterday vetoed a bill that would have allowed the operation of slot machines at state race tracks. Passage of the bill, which supporters said would boost the profits of Delaware's ailing racing industry, would be "harmful to the quality of life in Delaware," Castle said in his veto message. Not only is gambling for non-charitable purposes against Delaware's public policy, said Castle, but it "is an addiction which can destroy lives, and some argue that few forms of gambling are more additive than slot-machine gambling.
NEWS
June 29, 2006 | By Jeff Shields INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board resolved a nine-month standoff yesterday and awarded licenses to 12 slot-machine distributors, which will allow horse racetracks to get their licenses in September. At the same Harrisburg meeting, a group of Philadelphians confronted the board on its policy of prohibiting the public from speaking at its sessions. Deciding how slot machines will be sold in the state is "a major step forward for gaming in Pennsylvania," board Chairman Tad Decker said.
NEWS
August 2, 1992 | By Bill Ordine, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Don Laughlin is an anomaly in modern American business. While the leveraged-buyout artists of the last decade left scores of companies mere corporate shells scurrying for bankruptcy protection, Laughlin expanded his Riverside Hotel-Casino in this out-of-the-way Nevada town by more than 500 percent, built a bridge spanning the Colorado River (then donated it to the government) and jump-started a nine-figure tourism industry here. In short, Laughlin - with nearly $400 million in gaming revenues in 1990, placing it third in the state behind Las Vegas and Reno - owes not only its name but its very existence to the 60-year-old, silver-haired, gold-chain- bedecked gaming pioneer who started as a 17-year-old slot-machine operator in his home state of Minnesota.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - They're hard to miss. Follow the smell, or the smoke billowing over their slot machines. Gambler-smokers are as much a fixture at casinos as cocktail waitresses in skimpy outfits. But are gambling and smoking inextricably linked? "They go together," Paul Fischer, a limousine driver from Clifton, N.J., said as he took a puff while playing a $1 slot at the Borgata recently. "Every time I push a button on a slot machine, it goes hand-in-hand with the nicotine going to my brain," said Fischer, 62, who has been smoking for four decades.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
September 4, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Trump Plaza closes in two weeks, Atlantic City casinos will have 17,413 slot machines, fewer than half the total when Atlantic City's gambling revenue peaked at $5.2 billion in 2006. The 52 percent decline - from 36,620 in 2006 - in slot machines tops the overall 48 percent decline in slots revenue since 2006, based on results for the year ended July 31. So does that mean there's been enough bloodshed and no more Atlantic City casinos have to close? It's impossible to say if there will be enough business for the eight casinos that will remain when Trump Plaza closes after 30 years, putting its 1,020 employees out of work, according to one expert.
NEWS
April 26, 2014 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
After finishing his lesson this week, Drexel University instructor Bob Ambrose told his undergraduates to take five. "Play some slots," he suggested. Which they did, attaching themselves to three bona fide slot machines and pulling their handles. The university this month became the first in the state to install slot machines for use in its casino management courses. The machines, known as "Reel Money," "Power Strike," and "American Original," donated by Bally Technology, don't accept money or pay out, but work much the same as a slot machine on any casino floor.
BUSINESS
June 22, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - Revel is embracing all things gambling-related, with a shift in strategy to address its biggest trouble spot and a tweak to its name. The casino at the Boardwalk's north end, which emerged May 21 from a bankruptcy resulting from anemic monthly gaming revenue, Thursday announced the new name, Revel Casino Hotel, and a new marketing theme, "Gamblers Wanted. " The campaign pulls away from Revel's original emphasis on its nongaming attractions, and involves an aggressive slot promotion in which the casino will refund all slot losses greater than $100 to gamblers using Revel Cards for the entire month of July.
NEWS
February 14, 2013 | By Suzette Parmley and Jennifer Lin, Inquirer Staff Writers
The half-dozen applicants for Philadelphia's second casino license touted the merits of their proposals Tuesday before the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board. Flashy videos with images of the city's skyline, its iconic attractions, and its smiling residents were standard fare. The first four groups - led by local developer Ken Goldenberg, South Philadelphia businessman Joseph Procacci, a partnership between regional casino operators Greenwood Gaming and Entertainment Inc. and Cordish Cos., and gaming giant Penn National Gaming Inc. - gave it their best shot.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - They're hard to miss. Follow the smell, or the smoke billowing over their slot machines. Gambler-smokers are as much a fixture at casinos as cocktail waitresses in skimpy outfits. But are gambling and smoking inextricably linked? "They go together," Paul Fischer, a limousine driver from Clifton, N.J., said as he took a puff while playing a $1 slot at the Borgata recently. "Every time I push a button on a slot machine, it goes hand-in-hand with the nicotine going to my brain," said Fischer, 62, who has been smoking for four decades.
NEWS
October 26, 2012
WE DON'T need another casino, especially by wannabe union buster Bart Blatstein. We need manufacturing jobs that put money in people's pockets, not take it out. City Council needs to grow a backbone and just say no to Bart! Jim Hart Philadelphia A black Autumn? So this beautiful 12-year old girl, who happened to be white, was brutally murdered by two young black kids. As tragic as this crime is, it's just looked at as a crime. I'm curious to know how it would be viewed if it was a black girl killed by two white kids.
NEWS
March 16, 2012 | By David Iams, For The Inquirer
Three sales over the next few days will offer the acquisitions of a Midwest arcade-game collector, a New York antique toy-store proprietor, and a Delaware Civil War prison guard. The arcade-game collector was the late Frank Zygmunt Sr. of Chicago, a trader for 25 years in vintage slot machines, jukeboxes, and similar coin-operated devices. Zygmunt's collection will be offered by Morphy Auctions at a sale beginning at 10 a.m. Saturday at the gallery near Reading. The 415-lot sale also is being conducted online through Morphy's website, www.morphyauctions.com , and at www.LiveAuctioneers.com . Vintage coin-ops have long been collectible, often winding up in residential basement bars.
NEWS
March 8, 2012 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania horse racing leaders say Gov. Corbett's proposal to remove $72 million from a special fund created from slot-machine revenues threatens the state's thriving equine industry. Seeking to address a budget shortfall, Corbett wants to shift the money from the Race Horse Development Fund into agricultural and veterinary research and funding for county fairs. Industry leaders, who were granted an unusual formal hearing before the House Appropriations Committee on Wednesday, said the move would cause horse-breeding incentives and winners' purses to plummet.
NEWS
January 5, 2012 | By Jacqueline L. Urgo, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - More than 320 slot machines were wheeled into the Revel Atlantic City casino on Wednesday, the $2.4 billion mega-resort that officials say could open well before Memorial Day. Construction at Revel, which takes its design inspiration from the ocean's waves, is about two weeks ahead of schedule, according to Lisa Johnson, a spokeswoman for the Revel Entertainment Group. The facility may welcome guests before its previously announced May 15 opening date, she said.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|