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Slot Machines

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BUSINESS
December 30, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Five-cent slot machines in this casino city could become as rare as buffalo nickels. By the end of January, the Casino Control Commission is expected to vote on a proposal that would lift a requirement that the city's gaming halls set aside five percent of their slot-machine space to nickel slots. Even before discussion of the change, the casino industry had gradually reduced the percentage of nickel slots on the gaming floors because they were not as profitable as other slot machines.
SPORTS
March 18, 1997 | By Craig Donnelly, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Legislation that would allow up to 3,000 slot machines at each of Pennsylvania's two thoroughbred and two standardbred tracks has been introduced by State Sen. Robert "Tommy" Tomlinson (R., Bucks). Proponents believe the slots would produce $375 million in annual revenues targeted to increasing purses at the tracks and helping support public education and other programs in the state. A similar measure, attached to existing legislation, was voted down by the state Senate, 27-23, in November.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2001 | By STEPHEN GARY For the Daily News
My pulse quickened and my heart beat faster as I sat down in front of a row of vintage one-arm bandits. I am not a gambler and yet I spent more than an hour last week playing with a dozen slot machines. The operative word here is "with. " I was not playing the slots, I was playing with the slots, and when I was done, I felt more like a kid in a candy store in Pennsauken than a gambler in Atlantic City. That's because the slot machines were in the Pennsauken, N.J., display showroom of Bob Levy, who owns one of the largest coin-operated machine dealerships in the country.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Trump Plaza closes in two weeks, Atlantic City casinos will have 17,413 slot machines, fewer than half the total when Atlantic City's gambling revenue peaked at $5.2 billion in 2006. The 52 percent decline - from 36,620 in 2006 - in slot machines tops the overall 48 percent decline in slots revenue since 2006, based on results for the year ended July 31. So does that mean there's been enough bloodshed and no more Atlantic City casinos have to close? It's impossible to say if there will be enough business for the eight casinos that will remain when Trump Plaza closes after 30 years, putting its 1,020 employees out of work, according to one expert.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1987 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Inquirer Antiques Writer
Anyone who believes that nothing beats hearing old 78s on the machines on which they were meant to be played will enjoy this weekend's third annual Philadelphia Antique Jukebox, Slot-Machine and Advertising Show and Sale. Do you like rhythm-and-blues, country-western, the big bands or rock-and- roll? You'll hear them coming from one or another of the 65 dealers booths at the George Washington Motor Lodge's convention center on Route 611 in Willow Grove. At this show, there will be 50 to 60 jukeboxes, ranging in price from $1,000 to nearly $10,000.
NEWS
June 3, 2003
Robert Cogan's May 24 letter ("Take creative approach to casinos in Pa. ") refers to Jeff Hooke's testimony before the state Senate Finance Committee regarding the auctioning of gambling licenses. What Hooke proposed was selling eight licenses over a period of time to the highest bidders to permit them to construct full-blown, Las Vegas-style casinos in the state's major cities. This will never happen because the public doesn't want it and the politicians will never vote for it. Therefore, we will still hear the continuous sucking sound of billions of dollars leaving Pennsylvania to support social programs in Delaware, West Virginia and New Jersey.
NEWS
June 6, 1997
It's a real wonder how Pennsylvanians survived back in the 1950s, when they couldn't legally gamble their money on horse racing, lotteries or off-track betting. Must have been pretty boring with all those spare millions jangling around in their pockets. Then in 1959, the state placed one of its first big bets, by legalizing racetracks. Once it bet on that first horse, the legislature, like a compulsive gambler, found itself seduced by other long-odds ventures. Now the legislature is being suckered by a new gamble - a proposal to allow slot machines at struggling Pennsylvania race courses.
NEWS
January 17, 1990 | By Don Manley, Special to The Inquirer
The state's House of Representatives failed yesterday to override Gov. Castle's veto of a bill that would legalize slot machines at Delaware race tracks. The vote on whether to bring the issue to the House floor was 20-20 with one abstention, five votes short of the three-fifths majority needed for approval. Slot machines were hailed as the potential savior of Delaware's financially beleaguered race tracks by those involved in the racing industry and by the effort's chief proponent, Rep. William A. Oberle (R., Scottfield)
BUSINESS
April 28, 2008 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 30 years ago, New Jersey was on the verge of legalizing casino gaming. Mac Seelig, then assistant manager at a hotel chain in Atlantic City, realized someone would have to supply the slot machines. Today, Seelig, 65, is president and chief executive officer of the company he founded in his Absecon home. A.C. Coin & Slot, in Pleasantville, N.J., has become the largest slots manufacturer and diversified casino supply company in the Atlantic City-Philadelphia region and one of the largest privately owned companies of its kind in the world.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Jeff Hurvitz
Jeff Hurvitz lives and writes in Abington Township I think the bill bringing slot machines to Pennsylvania is a good thing. There is at least the chance that gambling will seed other opportunities for commerce in this state. The bill itself is a gamble, and, despite the odds, the downsides of gambling, and the stakes at hand - which includes the future of Philadelphia - I think it's a chance we should take. The bill, approved July 2, allows for the placement of up to 61,000 slot machines into 14 venues throughout the state.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 3, 2016 | By Angela Couloumbis and Karen Langley, HARRISBURG BUREAU
HARRISBURG - The Republican-controlled House and Senate left the Capitol building Friday - possibly for the entire holiday weekend - without having resolved how they are going to pay for the $31.5 billion budget they have sent to Gov. Wolf. After hours of closed-door talks, leaders in the chambers sent their members home, a sign that they are still wrangling among themselves and with the Democratic governor over how much in new revenue is necessary - and what taxes are needed to raise it - to bolster the spending plan they approved with impressive majorities earlier in the week.
NEWS
June 2, 2016
LAST WEEK, we suggested creating a bipartisan commission to mediate the ongoing fight between Gov. Wolfe and the Republican-controlled Legislature over state spending and taxes. The commission would be charged with studying the state's spending habits and tax policies and recommend sensible ways to bring in enough money to sustain government operations and meet the mandates for subsidizing local governments and public schools. Our argument was that, without a third party to call a timeout on the partisan war, the Legislature and the governor will remain at loggerheads.
NEWS
October 23, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Pennsylania Gaming Control Board on Wednesday approved an expansion at Parx Casino in Benesalem, that will add 268 slot machines and boost annual revenue by and estimated $15 million to $20 million. Parx, which is owned by Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc., had $507.6 million in gambling revenue in the 12 months ended June 30, ranking second in Pennsylvania behind Sands Bethlehem. A portion of the expansion, which will increase Parx's gaming floor 15 percent by expanding into space that is currently unused, will be ready to open Nov. 5, Parx officials told Gaming Board members.
NEWS
October 22, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Greenwood Gaming & Entertainment Inc. plans to expand the gaming floor at Parx Casino, in Bensalem, by 15 percent, to 176,592 square feet, if it gets approval at the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board's meeting Wednesday in Harrisburg. The plan calls for adding 220 slot machines, a 6.7 percent increase, according to Greenwood's petition filed last month. The number of table games would increase to 182 from 168, or 8 percent. A Parx spokeswoman did not respond to a request for additional information, such as how much Greenwood will spend on the expansion and how long it will take.
TRAVEL
September 28, 2015 | By Shannon McCloskey Allain, For The Inquirer
LAS VEGAS - The first sign we've arrived on a strange planet is the presence of slot machines in the airport. Lined up in welcome, they emit cheerful blips and beeps and colorful flashes. The kids notice them immediately, forbidden video games that might, if you're lucky, spit money. "Why are they here?" they ask. "Because gambling is legal in Nevada," I explain. "So people get off the plane and play right away?" "Some," I say with a glance at my husband, who still can't believe I arranged a family trip to Las Vegas.
BUSINESS
June 12, 2015 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
Only in Pennsylvania: Gamblers would not be allowed to register online to open Internet gambling accounts unless they live more than 20 miles away as the crow flies from a bricks-and-mortar casino. Any closer, and they would have to travel to a casino and register in person, under the provisions of a Senate bill in Harrisburg calling for big changes to the state's gambling landscape. The goal is to give the brick-and-mortar casinos a better chance to tap into their local target audience.
NEWS
May 28, 2015 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
MARY JACKSON was a woman of many talents, most of them directed at helping others. Such as her skill with herbal remedies. You have an angry liver? Mary had a remedy. Constipation? Ditto. Respiratory problem? Drink her concoction and you'll breathe easier. Mary wasn't a doctor, but she had made a serious study of herbal medication. She didn't claim cures, but her remedies made sufferers feel better. Mary Elizabeth Crawford Allen Jackson, a 32-year employee in the payroll department of the companies that owned the Daily News and Inquirer, a devoted churchwoman, dedicated traveler and loving family matriarch, died May 14 of cancer.
NEWS
April 7, 2015 | By Chris Mondics, Inquirer Staff Writer
Shirley Resnick, 85, of Haverford, a retired elementary schoolteacher and mother of three with a wide circle of friends and a lifelong passion for early-childhood learning, died Saturday, April 4, after a year-and-a-half-long battle with pancreatic cancer. Mrs. Resnick remained active until nearly the end and continued her weekly reading sessions with students at Stratford Friends School until just recently, said her daughter, Rhonda Cohen. Mrs. Resnick's son-in-law, David Cohen, executive vice president of Comcast Corp.
NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - In another blow to the state's struggling horse racing industry, the owner of Atlantic City Race Course announced it will cease operations and close permanently after heavy losses the last eight years. The racetrack's last day of business for simulcasting will be Friday. The closure leaves New Jersey with three operating horse tracks - Meadowlands, Freehold, and Monmouth. "We regret to announce that we must close Atlantic City Race Course immediately due to continuous business decline in the industry, the current regional economic climate, and the absence of alternative revenue opportunities," Joe Wilson, president of Greenwood ACRA Inc., owner and operator of the track, said in a statement Friday.
BUSINESS
September 4, 2014 | By Harold Brubaker, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Trump Plaza closes in two weeks, Atlantic City casinos will have 17,413 slot machines, fewer than half the total when Atlantic City's gambling revenue peaked at $5.2 billion in 2006. The 52 percent decline - from 36,620 in 2006 - in slot machines tops the overall 48 percent decline in slots revenue since 2006, based on results for the year ended July 31. So does that mean there's been enough bloodshed and no more Atlantic City casinos have to close? It's impossible to say if there will be enough business for the eight casinos that will remain when Trump Plaza closes after 30 years, putting its 1,020 employees out of work, according to one expert.
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