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Slow Food

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FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Set on the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay, with the produce powerhouse of New Jersey at its back door, Cape May is all about food. And with food comes politics. With politics comes discussions and occasionally arguments. The Cape May Forum, a nonprofit that conducts thought-inspiring series on various topics, this year will host "Guess What's Coming for Dinner? The Politics of Food in the 21st Century. " Running Thursday to Sunday and Sept. 22-25, the series will cover the Slow Food movement as well as fast food, the business of food, the politics of nutrition, sustainable farming and fishing, dining out, food and health, and "the real cost" of cheap food.
SPORTS
November 3, 2009 | By BETH D'ADDONO For the Daily News
WHAT DOES IT take to fuel Phillies relief pitcher Chan Ho Park's 95-mph fastballs? A lot of octopus, according to his wife, Ri-Hye Park. "He likes it stir-fried and spicy," said Park, 34, who married the South Korean baseball star in December 2005. A trained chef - she studied for 2 years at the Culinary Institute of America, in Hyde Park, N.Y. - Park is proficient in classic French and Italian techniques. It took her marriage to Chan Ho to connect her with her culinary roots, which are at the heart of "Ri-Hye's Kitchen," a cookbook with 160 recipes published in Korean in her husband's home country.
NEWS
October 21, 2004 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
They have followed their symbol, the snail, to Northern Italy by the thousands. Small farmers, fishermen, cheesemakers, peasants and nomads from Africa to Philadelphia have been summoned here from around the globe by the Slow Food movement for a rare international summit of artisanal food producers. Their aim: to forge an international alliance to build alternatives to industrial food production. "Maybe it's not utopian to think that here in Turin we will be able to lay the foundation for a network of food communities," said Carlo Petrini, the charismatic founder of Slow Food who addressed the opening assembly yesterday, "so that we can feel we are not alone.
FOOD
December 31, 2009
One hot Italian At a hole in the wall called Pasto just east of City Hall you will find arguably the best Italian roasted vegetable sandwich in the city. It is called the Capriciosa. The owner Paola Chiavatti, a child of Abruzzi, bakes the rolls herself - miraculously airy, crisp-crusted ciabatta. She slices boiled russett potatoes and warms them in olive oil with sauteed onion. On goes toothsome broccoli rabe. And thin slices of eggplant, delicately egg-battered and fried. Then roasted peppers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 2002 | By ELISA LUDWIG For the Daily News
Call it a case of slow food vs. fast food. "This may be the first time you have neighbors in $400,000 homes and neighbors in $30,000 homes coming together here," said Sally Shontz, waving a hand at tents and tables along Girard Avenue at a neighborhood slow-food festival last Saturday. The newly formed Girard Avenue Alliance neighborhood activists are in the process of aligning themselves with the international Slow Food movement, which began in Rome in 1986 when Italian journalist Carlo Petrini lamented the opening of a McDonald's on the Spanish Steps, a sure sign, he felt, of the erosion of environment and culture in the face of the fast food.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic are the authors of the "Dictionary of Jewish Words" and are known as the Word Mavens We've been around long enough so that when we hear about a new trend, we immediately think about the old-school version. That's because everything old is eventually new again. This is especially true in fashion. If we had kept those bell-bottom jeans from 1968, we could have worn them again in 1998. When we saw Jessica Simpson's new beach cover-up in People magazine, we immediately thought it looked a lot like Marcia Brady's 1972 maxi dress.
FOOD
July 7, 2005 | By Jeff Weinstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The next time you visit a restaurant, glance around. Is the couple at the next table slicing their steak and lifting meat to mouth without looking at their plates? Were you to ask them just what color is the butter, how does the rice smell, will the string quartet we're hearing match the wine, what would they say? Yet they may have come to this eatery because of a review that described and praised in detail the beef, the butter, the rice. Perhaps, in their haste, the diners allowed the review to savor dinner for them.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By John de Graaf
On Friday, Americans are being urged to "take back" their time and reject the over-scheduling and stress that has overwhelmed some people. In the next two commentaries, the root of our time shortage is explained, and a writer tells how she has traded material goods for a life rich with activities, family and friends. By John de Graaf Most Americans say their lives feel like a rat race. Millions of us are overworked, over-scheduled, overwhelmed, just plain stressed out. Despite the promises of leisure made when the computer era was just beginning, we're working harder and longer than ever.
NEWS
July 30, 2000 | By Jeffrey Fleishman, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There was no breeze, not even a riffle in the awnings, as Paolo Saturnini marched through the near-empty piazza smiling and breathing in the scents of curing boar meat, leather, pesto, pecorino cheese, and hints of the geraniums and rhododendrons blooming on balconies. Shutters were closed for the afternoon siesta. A few tourists sat around beer glasses in the shade. The guys at Paolo Cozzi's barber shop were snoozing. The last of the church ladies headed home. From the vineyards to the olive groves, life was still and quiet.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1989 | By Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
A new 30-second TV commercial for Wendy's fast-food outlets stars Mario Giampaolo, owner-host of Brera's, an upscale Italian restaurant on South Street near 6th. Giampaolo is seen praising a Wendy's chicken parmesan sandwich. In this ad, Giampaolo appears wearing an Italian-tailored suit and dark glasses. He is standing next to a Ferrari sports car. He says, in Italian: "I love Italian sports cars. " English subtitles translate his words. He goes on to announce his love for Italian fashion and Italian cinema.
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TRAVEL
April 18, 2016 | By Larissa and Michael Milne, For The Inquirer
MODENA, Italy - As we ascended the winding stairs into the garret of Acetaia Giuseppe Giusti, a familiar musky grape aroma wafted over us, one that had we had previously associated with ancient wine cellars carved out of chalky loam. However, it was not wine we were going to taste, but another product of grapes, authentic Balsamico di Modena, the globally renowned vinegar that, in some cases, is so precious it is served via eyedropper. Modena is a city of contrasts. Two prominent buildings pierce the azure Italian sky; the 12th-century white-marble-clad cathedral and the racy, yellow curved roof of the Enzo Ferrari museum.
NEWS
March 10, 2013
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen Scolnic are the authors of the "Dictionary of Jewish Words" and are known as the Word Mavens We've been around long enough so that when we hear about a new trend, we immediately think about the old-school version. That's because everything old is eventually new again. This is especially true in fashion. If we had kept those bell-bottom jeans from 1968, we could have worn them again in 1998. When we saw Jessica Simpson's new beach cover-up in People magazine, we immediately thought it looked a lot like Marcia Brady's 1972 maxi dress.
FOOD
September 15, 2011 | By Michael Klein, PHILLY.COM
Set on the Atlantic Ocean and Delaware Bay, with the produce powerhouse of New Jersey at its back door, Cape May is all about food. And with food comes politics. With politics comes discussions and occasionally arguments. The Cape May Forum, a nonprofit that conducts thought-inspiring series on various topics, this year will host "Guess What's Coming for Dinner? The Politics of Food in the 21st Century. " Running Thursday to Sunday and Sept. 22-25, the series will cover the Slow Food movement as well as fast food, the business of food, the politics of nutrition, sustainable farming and fishing, dining out, food and health, and "the real cost" of cheap food.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2010 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
If you find yourself this holiday weekend with a houseful of energetic young tots and hungry parents, a trip to The Little Treehouse, in Chestnut Hill, will fill some hours with play and feed the crew with organic healthy options for a reasonable bill. Think a Chuck E. Cheese's, slow food, Please Touch Museum mash-up. This concept was the brainchild of owner Rachel Williams. As a mom of three little ones, she wanted a place with the community of a Starbucks but an environment that was tolerant of the behavior of the 5-and-under set, as well as clean and safe.
FOOD
December 31, 2009
One hot Italian At a hole in the wall called Pasto just east of City Hall you will find arguably the best Italian roasted vegetable sandwich in the city. It is called the Capriciosa. The owner Paola Chiavatti, a child of Abruzzi, bakes the rolls herself - miraculously airy, crisp-crusted ciabatta. She slices boiled russett potatoes and warms them in olive oil with sauteed onion. On goes toothsome broccoli rabe. And thin slices of eggplant, delicately egg-battered and fried. Then roasted peppers.
SPORTS
November 3, 2009 | By BETH D'ADDONO For the Daily News
WHAT DOES IT take to fuel Phillies relief pitcher Chan Ho Park's 95-mph fastballs? A lot of octopus, according to his wife, Ri-Hye Park. "He likes it stir-fried and spicy," said Park, 34, who married the South Korean baseball star in December 2005. A trained chef - she studied for 2 years at the Culinary Institute of America, in Hyde Park, N.Y. - Park is proficient in classic French and Italian techniques. It took her marriage to Chan Ho to connect her with her culinary roots, which are at the heart of "Ri-Hye's Kitchen," a cookbook with 160 recipes published in Korean in her husband's home country.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2007
IT WAS A summery afternoon and the Chain Gang was craving crab cakes so we decided to try the new Phillips' seafood restaurant at the Sheraton Hotel at 16th and Vine. "Seems kind of fancy," one Gangster said as we entered. "Seems kind of empty," said another. A few seconds later we learned Phillips was closed for lunch and although we were offered the option of dining buffet-style in the Sheraton lobby, the Chain Gang has standards - the hotel may be a chain, but the lobby wasn't.
FOOD
July 7, 2005 | By Jeff Weinstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The next time you visit a restaurant, glance around. Is the couple at the next table slicing their steak and lifting meat to mouth without looking at their plates? Were you to ask them just what color is the butter, how does the rice smell, will the string quartet we're hearing match the wine, what would they say? Yet they may have come to this eatery because of a review that described and praised in detail the beef, the butter, the rice. Perhaps, in their haste, the diners allowed the review to savor dinner for them.
NEWS
October 21, 2004 | By Craig LaBan INQUIRER RESTAURANT CRITIC
They have followed their symbol, the snail, to Northern Italy by the thousands. Small farmers, fishermen, cheesemakers, peasants and nomads from Africa to Philadelphia have been summoned here from around the globe by the Slow Food movement for a rare international summit of artisanal food producers. Their aim: to forge an international alliance to build alternatives to industrial food production. "Maybe it's not utopian to think that here in Turin we will be able to lay the foundation for a network of food communities," said Carlo Petrini, the charismatic founder of Slow Food who addressed the opening assembly yesterday, "so that we can feel we are not alone.
NEWS
October 21, 2003 | By John de Graaf
On Friday, Americans are being urged to "take back" their time and reject the over-scheduling and stress that has overwhelmed some people. In the next two commentaries, the root of our time shortage is explained, and a writer tells how she has traded material goods for a life rich with activities, family and friends. By John de Graaf Most Americans say their lives feel like a rat race. Millions of us are overworked, over-scheduled, overwhelmed, just plain stressed out. Despite the promises of leisure made when the computer era was just beginning, we're working harder and longer than ever.
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