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Sludge

NEWS
May 7, 1986 | By Susan Levine, Inquirer Staff Writer
Michael Wardell, who does not consider sewage a dirty word, will hold a peculiar open house Saturday in Westampton. All local residents and farmers are invited. Wardell is president of a company called Applied Land Sciences, and he wants to treat his guests to sludge. Specifically, he wants to show people how his company has been applying sludge fertilizer to fields at Sunnyside Farms since 1984. "They'll just get close to everything and see what's going on," he said. "There seems to be a great deal of mystery as to what is going on. " There has also been a great deal of controversy about the Sunnyside sludge operation.
NEWS
April 4, 1998 | By S. Joseph Hagenmayer, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Mack McKenzie, 64, an entrepreneur who made his living from septic-waste removal and farming with sludge as fertilizer, died in his sleep from brain cancer yesterday at Genesis Health Care Center, Voorhees. A Mount Laurel resident since 1975, he was born in Waycross, Ga., where he was orphaned at age 10 and quit school in sixth grade to work on his grandfather's farm. When he was 18, he moved to Philadelphia, where he found work playing steel guitar at nights. It was the early 1950s, and his day job was installing the television antennas that were just beginning to become commonplace on rooftops.
NEWS
March 23, 1989 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
Now that water discharged into Pennypack Creek is up to standard, the sewer authority has begun a $5 million plan to clean up smells that, for decades, have plagued Upper Moreland Township residents along Terwood Road. In the last two years, the Upper Moreland-Hatboro Sewer Authority has upgraded its waste-water treatment operation to the tune of $13 million, authority general manager Donald Armstrong told the township's Board of Commissioners on Monday night. The authority has improved water-pollution control at the 58-year-old plant, bringing the discharge into compliance with federal and state standards, Armstrong said.
NEWS
October 21, 1993 | By Nancy Petersen, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
A controversial permit to spread tons of sewage sludge on the Wheeler Aman farm here was approved late last week by state environmental officials. The 10-year permit was issued to Adsoil, a Kennett Square firm that was recently acquired by Browning-Ferris Industries of Pa. Inc, one of the largest solid-waste-management firms in the world. Approval was given despite near- unanimous opposition from neighbors, area environmentalists and politicians. "We're very disappointed, to say the least," said James Dolceamore, a resident of the Kimberbrae development, which is next to the Aman Farm.
NEWS
November 22, 1987 | By Joe Fite, Special to The Inquirer
The Keasbey & Mattison Co. has long since vanished from the borough of Ambler, but the residue left from that company's manufacture of asbestos - asbestos-contaminated sludge piles - has been ever present in the minds of borough residents and federal and state environmental officials. Finally, some of that sludge will leave the borough. Real estate developer John S. Rittenhouse of Villanova, president of Bo-Rit Corp., intends to take the sludge and mix it with cement and stone to form curb stops, splash pans and concrete blocks.
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | By Laura Fortunato, Special to The Inquirer
The Valley Forge Sewer Authority has overcome the sludge crises of the summer, according to its general manager. During the authority's Board of Directors meeting Monday, Joseph Bateman reported that the authority's treatment plant had less than 500 tons of sludge - waste from processing sewage - at the bottom of its pit, compared with the 3,400 tons of excess sludge recorded in early June. "Sludge has been removed steadily over the last three weeks," said Bateman, who estimated that the sludge has been hauled out at an average rate of 25 truckloads daily.
NEWS
August 29, 1991 | By Douglas A. Campbell, Inquirer Staff Writer
Take your $70 million sludge composting program and shove it - into the Pine Barrens - an angry crowd of 100 Mansfield Township residents told the Burlington County freeholders yesterday. The county has applied for state environmental permits to build an enormous composting facility, as well as a "materials recycling center," at its landfill on the Mansfield-Florence Township border. The composting operation will process up to 50 tons a day of sewage sludge from the county's municipalities.
NEWS
June 5, 2003 | By Thomas J. Gibbons Jr. INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Police yesterday were investigating the discovery of a fetus at a Water Department facility in Port Richmond. Investigators said they would await autopsy results on the fetus, estimated to have been in the sixth month of development, to determine how they will proceed in the case. The fetus, with the umbilical cord still attached, was found by a worker about 1 p.m. in some sludge at the Northeast Water Pollution Control Plant, a sprawling facility on Richmond Street near Wheatsheaf Lane, police said.
NEWS
May 6, 1997 | by Jim Smith, Daily News Staff Writer
A former Browning-Ferris executive yesterday was fined $25,000 by a federal judge for negligently failing to detect the illegal disposal of sewage sludge by company managers in the Philadelphia area. Robert Atkinson, 55, former president of BFI Services Group, a Browning-Ferris subsidiary, also was placed on two years' probation by U.S. District Judge Robert F. Kelly and ordered to donate 200 hours to community service in his hometown of Maui, Hawaii. "This is a sad day for me, personally," said Atkinson, who pleaded guilty to violating the federal Clean Water Act. Atkinson told the judge that while he accepts responsibility for the criminal acts of subordinates, he was in Houston and had no idea the illegal disposals were taking place.
NEWS
March 3, 1988 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
The president of the Wissinoming Boys Club has complained that the Wissinoming Park soccer field is unplayable because the city Water Department fertilized it last year with a compost product, which included sewage, that damaged the surface. But the Water Department and the city Recreation Department say the field has become a problem not because of the fertilizer but because it has poor drainage and is used heavily. The Wissinoming Park field, which is said to have attracted many neighborhood residents to evening soccer games among high school students each spring, is likely to lose those games for a second year in a row. "That field is unplayable," William Cappo, president of the Wissinoming Boys Club, said in an interview Monday.
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