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Slumber

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NEWS
June 6, 2004 | By Louise Harbach INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Once upon a time, a skunk named Slumber decided to take a nap in the pantry of an elementary school. Mrs. Crown, the principal, feared that if Slumber's nap were interrupted and he sprayed, the school would smell for weeks. Luckily, the custodian knew exactly what to do: He threw mothballs, which skunks hate, into the pantry, and Slumber jumped into the cage awaiting him by the pantry door. Soon Slumber was on his way down Van Sciver Parkway to a home in the nearby woods, where, according to Joyce Payne, who chronicled the events in The Skunk Caper at Lawrence Park, he lived happily ever after.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
Drexel University's Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design and the Department of Performing Arts will present the 19th Annual Madrigal Dinner at 7:30 tonight and Saturday. Both dinners will be in Drexel's Great Court, which will be transformed to represent the era of King James I and Shakespeare, with Renaissance-themed decorations and entertainment. The Drexel Chamber Singers, under the direction of Stephen Powell, want to take guests back in time to 1609 by performing the sounds of Elizabeth Madrigals, French chansons, and lute songs.
NEWS
June 3, 1998
It happened about 12:30 a.m. Monday. Twelve Monkeys was on cable, spinning a dark tale of an apocalypse lurking inside the humdrum of present-day Philadelphia. A flash and a sharp crackle outside, and Bruce Willis shrank to a point of light in the center of the screen, then disappeared. The family room went dark; the dog whimpered, paws on head, and shook. Another brilliant flash, and the backyard seemed eerily midday, the swing set something out of El Greco. Barely a breath later came the thunder; the storm was this close.
NEWS
July 26, 1990 | By Patrick Scott, Special to The Inquirer
It's been said that birds of a feather flock together, and such was the case yesterday when two roommates jailed at the Chester County Prison's Work Release Center took flight from the low-security building through a second- floor window. The jailbirds' early migration has Wardon Thomas G. Frame scratching his head. One of the men was to have been freed from the West Chester center any day; the other's time would have been up in November. "It's not the smartest thing in the world," Frame said.
NEWS
July 15, 1996 | by Julie Knipe Brown, Daily News Staff Writer
His friends watched horrified as a 13-year-old Bensalem boy blasted a bullet into his head yesterday while playing Russian roulette with a revolver he found during a slumber party. "Stop it! Stop it!" the teen-agers reportedly shouted as John Poulterer pressed the .38-caliber revolver against his head and pulled the trigger, the hammer clicking on an empty chamber. "Stop it!" they cried as Poulterer pulled the trigger again. This time, he triggered the bullet that tore through his skull.
NEWS
November 20, 2000 | By Michelle Malkin
When pigs fly. When hell freezes over. When the cow jumps over the moon. N-O. No, no, no! End of discussion. " This is what I'll tell my daughter when she asks me, many years from now, if she can attend a coed sleepover party. All across the country, believe it or not, adolescent boys and girls are romping around in their skivvies together under one roof with their parents' approval. The Washington Post devoted 1,200 words to this booming teen fad. A newspaper database search turned up nearly 200 other stories on coed sleepovers.
NEWS
March 8, 2007 | By Paula Marantz Cohen
All good sleepers are alike, but all insomniacs can't sleep in different ways. Some drop into a dead stupor at 10 p.m., only to find themselves wide awake at 3 a.m. Some fall asleep only at 3 after tossing and turning for hours. Some sleep fitfully, dozing and waking, their partners' snores and grunts punctuating the fragile ecology of their slumber. A recent survey by the National Sleep Foundation suggests that up to 60 percent of American women are sleep-deprived. My neighbor and I have considered calling each other in the middle of the night during our bouts of sleeplessness.
NEWS
December 6, 1993 | Daily News Wire Services
The discovery of 12-year-old Polly Klaas' body raises the question of whether the man who was charged yesterday in her kidnapping and murder had any accomplices. The 65-day search for Polly, which had captured the nation's attention and sympathy, ended late Saturday when her body was found in a thicket in Cloverdale, about 35 miles from her home. It was Richard Allen Davis, the twice-convicted kidnapper held as the prime suspect in her abduction, who pointed investigators to the spot in southern Mendocino County - a spot not previously searched.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On wanting what everyone else has: I admit I occasionally wish I had someone else's income, legs, job, etc., but the feeling is momentary. When I was 11, I was desperate to change places with Mary K., a beautiful blonde in my class. She had everything I wanted: a big brother, a big house on the lake, a father who was a doctor and thus didn't change jobs and force us to move every year, a bubbly personality. Her 11th birthday party was a sophisticated trip to dinner and the movies; mine was a run-of-the-mill slumber party.
NEWS
December 19, 1996 | By RICHARD COHEN
Bill Clinton is back. The progressive, reformist, garrulous and impressively knowledgeable president of yore has returned to Washington after months of acting otherwise on the campaign trail. As a candidate, he raised oodles of money in a dubious fashion, ducked the press and ignored topics that might not win him any votes. As president, he's opposed to all that. We now know that Clinton raised campaign funds shamelessly. The Washington Post tells us that he virtually rented out the White House and its Lincoln bedroom, awarding the place to the fattest of the fat cats.
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SPORTS
June 20, 2016 | By Matt Breen, STAFF WRITER
Pete Mackanin shuffled his lineup Saturday afternoon at Citizens Bank Park, hoping to spark his listless offense. The Phillies manager batted Cody Asche leadoff for the first time in his career. Andres Blanco slotted into the No. 3 spot. And Maikel Franco was bumped down to the sixth spot. But a 4-1 loss to Arizona proved that there is little the manager can do to disguise his team's woes at the plate. The Phillies were no match for Arizona ace Zack Greinke, who allowed one run in eight innings.
NEWS
January 22, 2016 | Inquirer Editorial Board
Both the American Academy of Pediatrics and the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention agree that starting school a little later would reduce teenage sleep deprivation, which can lead to depression, tardiness, poor grades, obesity, and even suicide. So why aren't more school districts changing when classes begin? One problem is the complex school bus schedules that districts say would cost a fortune to change. In the West Chester Area School District, Superintendent James Scanlon said, it could cost $36 million to reroute transportation for public, parochial, and charter schools.
SPORTS
December 11, 2014 | BY DICK JERARDI, Daily News Staff Writer jerardd@phillynews.com
IT WAS the Baltimore Jesuits against the Philadelphia Jesuits. And St. Ignatius might have been wondering exactly why all those Jesuit colleges have loved their basketball for so long. Loyola and Saint Joseph's had been playing for nearly 12 minutes at Hagan Arena. The Hawks had seven points. SJU coach Phil Martelli had a lot to say between Saturday afternoon, when his team got hammered at Villanova, and when the ball went up last night. "I wasn't really nice," he said. "I wasn't a real grandfather type to them on Sunday or Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2013 | By Lini S. Kadaba, For The Inquirer
Already, the 10 tween girls have devoured spaghetti tacos, made Lifesaver bracelets, changed into pajamas, and played several giggle-infused rounds of limbo. Next up on this Friday night in Elkins Park is a serious game of human mop - one girl drags another across the floor, which, the girls swear, is more fun than it sounds. The controlled chaos looks like any other sleepover. But as 10:30 p.m. approaches, the living room at the hosting Gormans' becomes increasingly crowded - with parents.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 2012 | By Carolyn Hax
While I'm away, readers give the advice. On wanting what everyone else has: I admit I occasionally wish I had someone else's income, legs, job, etc., but the feeling is momentary. When I was 11, I was desperate to change places with Mary K., a beautiful blonde in my class. She had everything I wanted: a big brother, a big house on the lake, a father who was a doctor and thus didn't change jobs and force us to move every year, a bubbly personality. Her 11th birthday party was a sophisticated trip to dinner and the movies; mine was a run-of-the-mill slumber party.
SPORTS
May 2, 2011 | By Matt Gelb, Inquirer Staff Writer
These are the perils of a feeble offense. In many of the season's first 27 games, the Phillies have hit just enough to win. Undoubtedly that means on some nights when the pitching is stellar, the hitting will fall short. Or sometimes these debilitating displays of hitting will drag on into the next morning. At 12:53 a.m. Monday, long after Charlie Manuel was ejected and Citizens Bank Park erupted in chants of "USA! USA!" as the news of Osama bin Laden's demise became known, John Mayberry Jr. struck out in the 14th inning to end a 2-1 Phillies loss to the New York Mets.
SPORTS
October 23, 2010 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
It wasn't so much an explosion as a tiny pop. The three decisive runs the Phillies scored in San Francisco during Game 5's third inning Thursday were the result of two singles, a hit batsman, a bunt that traveled a few inches sideways, a misplay at third, and an error on a ground ball to first. The inning happened to include a third but inconsequential single. More '62 New York Mets than '27 New York Yankees. As it has been for much of the 2010 regular season, the Phils' lineup has been inconsistent offensively in the postseason.
NEWS
October 17, 2010 | By Bob Ford, INQUIRER SPORTS COLUMNIST
All right, now the numbers are starting to add up a little, like the leaves that fall quietly from the trees and suddenly there is a stack of them there on the lawn. The Phillies have played four postseason games and scored a total of 16 runs, seven of which came in a game when the Cincinnati Reds decided to leave their gloves in the dugout. They have 28 hits in those four games and are batting .212. This isn't a lull any longer, a momentary downturn, a hiccup as the postseason begins.
NEWS
August 1, 2010
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2009 | By Kristin Granero FOR THE INQUIRER
Drexel University's Antoinette Westphal College of Media Arts and Design and the Department of Performing Arts will present the 19th Annual Madrigal Dinner at 7:30 tonight and Saturday. Both dinners will be in Drexel's Great Court, which will be transformed to represent the era of King James I and Shakespeare, with Renaissance-themed decorations and entertainment. The Drexel Chamber Singers, under the direction of Stephen Powell, want to take guests back in time to 1609 by performing the sounds of Elizabeth Madrigals, French chansons, and lute songs.
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