CollectionsSlumlord
IN THE NEWS

Slumlord

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
November 2, 1998 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
A judge has ruled that reputed slumlord John Gray, 63, is incompetent to stand trial for six murders, including those of four children, in a West Philadelphia apartment house that was rife with building code violations when it caught fire on April 5, 1997. Gray's lawyer, Ronald Greenblatt, argued that his client is suffering from brain damage that will never get better. He's faking it, said Assistant District Attorney Mark Gilson. "Mr. Gray's disability is proportionate to the amount of trouble he's in," said Gilson sarcastically.
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By WENDY RUDERMAN, rudermw@phillynews.com 215-854-2860
Leslie Reyes cringes each time she hears a knock on her front door. She dreads opening her mail. Ever since her Kensington home went into foreclosure in May 2009 and was later listed for sheriff sale, Reyes has endured a steady rap-rap-rapping of shady property investors at her door. She's been peppered with threatening letters from the bank and "pay or quit" notices from bank-appointed rent collectors. So far, Reyes has beaten back the bombardment, and she's determined to keep her Emerald Street home.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | By WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, rudermw@phillynews.com 215-854-2860
THE PORT RICHMOND of the early 1990s had working-class charm. Neighbors traded Crock-Pot recipes. They knew every kid by name. They scrubbed their steps with bleach and prettied their stoops with marigolds and mums. Then came the invasion of Robert N. Coyle Sr. Coyle, a real-estate investor who already had a stronghold in neighboring Kensington, swept into Port Richmond with fistfuls of cash. One by one, Coyle bought homes, some as cheap as $7,000, until his housing empire ballooned to hundreds of properties.
NEWS
September 25, 2007
In court, judges sometimes engage in what's known as a "colloquy" - an on-the-record conversation between the judge and the person who's in trouble. It's time for the Judicial Conduct Board of Pennsylvania to engage in a colloquy with Common Pleas Court Judge Rayford A. Means, the latest Philadelphia slumlord to don a black robe. An illuminating report in the Inquirer's Sunday editions by reporter Nancy Phillips detailed a multitude of problems at rental properties owned by Means.
NEWS
June 30, 1989
Morris and Joel Geller, father and son, are the sort of predators who you'd have thought went out with Dickens. Alas, they did not and have been running a modern-day slumlord operation out of Northeast Philadelphia, bilking the weak and uneducated, shredding even the real estate business's flexible code of ethics and, according to the City Solicitor's office, dodging thousands of dollars of taxes on unsafe, dilapidated properties. The irrepressible Gellers continued "ripping people off" even after their arrest last year, the DA's office complained at a sentencing hearing this week.
NEWS
December 18, 1987 | By CYNTHIA BURTON, Daily News Staff Writer
Two-and-a-half years ago, Patricia Smith - victim of a notorious slumlord - gathered her courage and asked City Council to help repair her home. After listening to stories of betrayal and broken dreams, Council members agreed to help. They voted to establish a $300,000 home-repair fund for Smith and about 100 other slumlord victims. That was in June 1985. Today Smith, 54, still lives in a drafty Logan rowhouse with cracks in the walls and a collapsed back porch. And she still awaits City Council's help.
NEWS
July 26, 2001
The School District, facing a $200-million-plus deficit, should fire 17,000 non-teaching employees today - political patronage employees first. Hire subcontractors to fill those jobs and you will see a leaner, more efficient school system. Stop playing with Band-Aids and begging in Harrisburg for more. We don't need more money; we need real leadership. Joe Simiriglio Jr., Philadelphia Same old rig(a)marole I noticed (July 23) that you have decided to slant the odds in your favor by cheating on the word sleuth puzzle.
NEWS
May 24, 1991 | by Don Russell, Daily News Staff Writer
Today was supposed to be eviction day for the 48 people who live in a stinking, festering slumhole called The Louvian, in Southwest Philadelphia. The city Department of Licenses and Inspection had decreed the apartment building - owned by a convicted slumlord - unfit for human habitation. An L&I official told the tenants they would be evicted at 10 a.m. But last night, the tenants got a reprieve, of sorts. Though L&I says the four-story building is a certified firetrap, there will be no evictions today.
NEWS
March 21, 1996 | By Vanessa Williams, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
For the last several days, U.S. Rep. Tom Foglietta and his Democratic primary challenger, John Braxton, have been trading insults over who was a bigger slumlord. Yesterday, the city's Department of Licenses and Inspections got into the middle of the fray - literally. L&I Commissioner Robert Barnett crashed a news conference in which Braxton was accusing Barnett of misusing his power by ordering a "raid" at his campaign headquarters at Foglietta's behest. Barnett, a former aide and campaign worker for Foglietta, got into a shouting match with Braxton and his campaign consultants, whom the commissioner declared to be "the sleaziest two people in politics in the city.
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Mark Fazlollah, Dylan Purcell, Andrew Maykuth, and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
He was once an "undisputed king" of porn. But in his twilight years, he has recast himself as a visionary for a more vibrant downtown. The grand plan of 87-year-old Richard C. Basciano collapsed in a cloud of dust and debris Wednesday when the botched demolition of one of his Center City buildings rained death down on a building below. In an interview last year, Basciano talked of his ambitious plans for the 2100 and 2200 blocks of Market Street, where he planned to transform a decrepit stretch of nondescript buildings that included his shuttered porn theater.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 10, 2013 | By Mark Fazlollah, Dylan Purcell, Andrew Maykuth, and Craig R. McCoy, Inquirer Staff Writers
He was once an "undisputed king" of porn. But in his twilight years, he has recast himself as a visionary for a more vibrant downtown. The grand plan of 87-year-old Richard C. Basciano collapsed in a cloud of dust and debris Wednesday when the botched demolition of one of his Center City buildings rained death down on a building below. In an interview last year, Basciano talked of his ambitious plans for the 2100 and 2200 blocks of Market Street, where he planned to transform a decrepit stretch of nondescript buildings that included his shuttered porn theater.
NEWS
May 17, 2013 | BY BARBARA LAKER, Daily News Staff Writer lakerb@phillynews.com, 215-854-5933
ROBERT N. Coyle Sr., a notorious Philadelphia slumlord, stood before the judge yesterday in tears, minutes before he was to be sentenced for defrauding banks of more than $10 million. Coyle, 68, told U.S. District Court Judge Stewart Dalzell about his struggles growing up poor in Kensington, the same neighborhood where he later acquired wealth. As a child, he lived in rickety houses and his mother worked in sweatshops and he slogged away in a paper factory as a teen, he said. He became a real-estate mogul and admitted to the court he made mistakes when the economy soured.
NEWS
October 3, 2012 | BY MICHAEL HINKELMAN, Daily News Staff Writer
ASOUTH JERSEY real-estate mogul dubbed the "Slumlord Millionaire" admitted in federal court on Monday that he bilked two banks of more than $10 million in 2007 to help shore up his real-estate empire in the city. Robert Coyle Sr., 67, of Glassboro, faces up to 51 months in a federal lockup when he is sentenced on Jan. 4. At one time, Coyle's various entities controlled more than 300 properties, mostly in Port Richmond and Kensington. Federal prosecutors alleged that in May 2007, Coyle borrowed $3.5 million from East River Bank and $6.6 million in June 2007 from Republic Bank and then lied to the banks about property titles and income from 188 properties he put up as collateral.
NEWS
March 5, 2012
PITY OUR shabby, down-at-the-heels city. For decades, Philadelphia has been the smelly, bench-occupying bum of big cities, struggling with blight, abandoned and vacant properties, whole blocks in crumbling disrepair thanks to the general contempt shown by many of its property owners and renters. We're not alone among big cities, but blight is something we seem to excel at. As mayor, John Street spent nearly $300 million with his elaborate Neighborhood Transformation Intitiative program, trying to tear out the blight problem at its roots by demolishing 14,000 properties; NTI only half-succeeded.
NEWS
March 5, 2012 | BY BARBARA LAKER AND WENDY RUDERMAN, Daily News Staff Writers
FOR THE alleged victims of Philadelphia's homegrown "Slumlord Millionaire," federal prison for him would be too comfy. Robert Coyle Sr. - the real-estate mogul who was widely known for peddling shabby homes to the city's poorest and robbing them of their dream of home ownership - was indicted last week on charges of defrauding banks out of $10 million. If convicted, Coyle could face up to 120 years in prison and $4 million in fines. "I'm liking that he might have to pay $4 million in fines - he'll feel that," Inez Ramos, an alleged Coyle victim, said last night.
NEWS
March 2, 2012 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A real estate investor once described by tenants as a "millionaire slumlord" was charged Friday with defrauding banks of $10 million in an effort to shore up his rowhouse empire in Kensington and Port Richmond. The charges against Robert Coyle Sr., 66, of Glassboro, were handed up by a federal grand jury in Philadelphia. Coyle is accused of defrauding the East River Bank and Republic First Bank of more than $10 million in 2007 - at the height of the real estate bubble - by lying to the banks about property titles and income from rental houses put up as collateral.
NEWS
October 26, 2011 | BY DAN GERINGER, geringd@phillynews.com 215-854-5961
THE GLORY DAYS of Philadelphia slumlords will end this week when the city's Licenses and Inspections Department begins hauling their blighted butts into court and kicking them hard in their personal assets. For years, absentee owners of blighted vacant properties that ruin otherwise-stable blocks had it easy because L&I sent violation notices to the nuisance houses - an exercise in futility if there ever was one. Those days are over. Boldly going where no L&I commissioner has gone before, Fran Burns will extradite out-of-town owners and usher them into the city's new blight court (City Hall, Room 447)
NEWS
February 18, 2011 | By WENDY RUDERMAN, rudermw@phillynews.com 215-854-2860
Leslie Reyes cringes each time she hears a knock on her front door. She dreads opening her mail. Ever since her Kensington home went into foreclosure in May 2009 and was later listed for sheriff sale, Reyes has endured a steady rap-rap-rapping of shady property investors at her door. She's been peppered with threatening letters from the bank and "pay or quit" notices from bank-appointed rent collectors. So far, Reyes has beaten back the bombardment, and she's determined to keep her Emerald Street home.
NEWS
January 18, 2011 | By WENDY RUDERMAN & BARBARA LAKER, rudermw@phillynews.com 215-854-2860
TWO-AND-A-HALF years have passed since Robert N. Coyle Sr. defaulted on bank loans on nearly 300 Kensington homes that he rented to the city's poorest in search of the American dream. Dozens of tenants who had poured money into decrepit homes believing that they'd one day own them found themselves in the eye of a massive foreclosure storm, and one step from homelessness. That's when they dubbed Coyle "a dream killer" and a "slumlord millionaire. " Since the Daily News chronicled Coyle's shattered empire in October 2009, some tenants still fear they'll be evicted.
1 | 2 | 3 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|