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BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Small business is almost always an issue in presidential campaigns. This year, it's morphed into one of the biggest. Getting the backing of the small-business community is important for most political candidates. Small-company owners are often influencers: They are well-known in their cities and towns and they employ voters with a vested interest in the challenges that they face. The Republican Party and Mitt Romney have been talking about small business for months, focusing on voter concerns such as taxes and health care as small-business issues.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
Small-business owners' concerns about government policies have intensified since the deep recession and a recovery that doesn't feel much better. Karen Kerrigan serves the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council as president, and Raymond Keating is its chief economist. The 18-year-old council, which has 100,000 members, takes a stand similar to other groups: Small businesses are struggling because they have to contend with too many taxes and regulations - words that are coming up a lot in presidential campaign speeches, videos, and commercials.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
By Michael Carroll Too often, we lack balance when we talk about businesses and their owners. I came of age in the late 1960s and early '70s, an out-of-balance time. Back then, a good part of public opinion was very critical of business and business people, sometimes unfairly so. There was a popular song at the time by a guy named Ray Stevens called "Mr. Businessman," and it was pretty rough on folks with that title. Here is a little sample of the lyrics: Itemize the things you covet As you squander through your life Bigger cars, bigger houses Term insurance for your wife Tuesday evenings with your harlot And on Wednesdays it's your charlatan analyst, He's high up on your list Forty years ago, businesses and business people were not widely admired or portrayed very favorably.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
If you own or have owned a small business, what advice would you give to someone just starting out? Send essays of 250 words or less by Feb. 22, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Business at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-454
BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Commercial lending standards have tightened in the past year for small businesses and scuttled a major portion of contracted transactions for smaller properties, the National Association of Realtors reported Thursday. "There have been notable improvements in capital for large commercial transactions valued at $2.5 million or higher, but there remain significant challenges for small business," said Realtors' chief economist Lawrence Yun. According to Real Capital Analytics, more than 13,000 major properties valued at $2.5 million or higher traded hands in 2011.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Montgomery County Private Industry Council wants to get small business owners involved in big business. The council is sponsoring a conference Wednesday that will introduce small business owners to the opportunities to work with federal and state agencies and large private businesses. "There is so much potential out there for anybody who is interested," said Barry Reimenschneider, procurement specialist for the 6-year-old council. The Government Agency Awareness Reception is scheduled to be held at the Valley Forge Sheraton Convention Center from 8 a.m to noon.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is plenty of consensus on the benefits of keeping it small. One child is easier to handle than three. A two-door sedan is more fuel-efficient than a stretch limousine. And, of course, the gift-giving creed: Good things come in small packages. Then there's the business world. Ask small-business owners how life is and brace yourself for a litany of hardships. Topping the list might be that they don't have time to answer your question. "There are major challenges in running a small business," said Donna Marie DeCarolis, associate dean for graduate programs at Drexel University's LeBow College of Business.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Alan J. Steinberg
The legendary Jersey Devil is a creature that has haunted inhabitants of and visitors to the Pine Barrens. Of course, the Jersey Devil is a myth, despite numerous claims of its authenticity. There is, however, a real-life devil that has hindered small-business creation, development and expansion in New Jersey the last four decades. This creature is the ever-growing burden of federal and state regulation of all types, including environmental, labor and financial regulation. Per employee, all these government mandates have a disproportionate impact on small business.
NEWS
March 16, 2004 | By W. WILSON GOODE Jr
ON THURSDAY, Mayor Street will formally share with City Council his latest vision for his two-term mayoralty. The mayor will offer a partial blueprint for economic growth and will call for an Economic Development Summit to be held this spring. Economic development is a new strategic focus for this administration. But it has always been mine. As a result of my legislative initiatives, on March 25, Council's Commerce and Economic Development Committee will hold hearings to update the status of lending goals submitted by banks holding city money.
NEWS
July 3, 2006 | By Brenda Hopper and Gary Rago
New Jersey needs to increase its financial support for the programs that help small businesses - the backbone of the state's economy - to develop, grow and compete, just as neighboring states have done. Last year, Pennsylvania invested $6.7 million and New York $2.5 million in their small-business development centers. New Jersey spent only $800,000. Even Georgia and North Carolina, states comparable in size to New Jersey, poured more money into their development centers, which are nonprofits that assist with startups, work with business owners on accounting and marketing, and help with business plans and securing contracts.
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NEWS
March 5, 2015 | Mensah M. Dean, Daily News Staff Writer
NO ONE LANDED a knockout punch. No one stumbled badly. Thus, no one broke away from the pack. Instead, at last night's latest mayoral forum, six candidates seeking the Democratic nomination for Philadelphia mayor showed themselves to have quite similar views on a range of issues. Hosted by the Next Great City Coalition, which represents 130 community, faith, environmental, business and union organizations, the forum at the Pennsylvania Convention Center focused on the coalition's six key initiative areas: improving substandard housing, supporting small businesses, cleaning up public spaces, improving nutrition for children, creating more trails and bike lanes, and storm preparedness.
NEWS
February 26, 2015 | By Amy Worden, Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania residents will likely hear a proposal for a broad-based tax increase when Gov. Wolf proposes his first budget next week. After meeting with business leaders Tuesday, Wolf declined to discuss details of his plan but would not rule out a graduated income tax targeting high-income brackets, a structure he has touted in the past. "What I talked about was a fairer tax system. I do intend to present that," he said. "This is a chance for a reset. I hope the people of Pennsylvania will be pleased with what I propose.
SPORTS
February 25, 2015 | BY TOM MAHON, Daily News Staff Writer mahont@phillynews.com
THINKING OF running in, or attending, the annual Pyongyang marathon in North Korea in April? Think again. Travel restrictions that were implemented in October will not, as expected, be lifted in time for the event, which means only locals will be able to attend or run in the race. Supreme leader Kim Jong Un is reportedly afraid foreigners will spread Ebola, which he believes is a biological weapon developed by the United States. You can't make this stuff up. But Andrea Lee, the co-founder and CEO of Uri Tours in Palisades, N.J., told the Associated Press that 200 runners had signed up with her company.
BUSINESS
February 10, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
What do an Ivy League university, a frozen-yogurt chain, and John Cipollone, a 70-year-old Center City grandfather not at all self-conscious about being bald, have in common? All have embraced a whimsical trend rapidly altering the way business communicates to consumers and employees: Animation. Walt Disney Studios has known of the appeal of hand-drawn moving figures since Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs wowed audiences in 1938. Now, in increasing numbers, businesses and institutions outside the entertainment industry are turning to animation to make an impression.
NEWS
December 16, 2014 | By Suzette Parmley, Inquirer Staff Writer
ATLANTIC CITY - It wasn't long ago that the ovens at Formica Bros. Bakery were going full blast - putting out 50,000 pieces of bread a day. As recently as 2007, the nearly century-old establishment in the city's Ducktown section employed 70 people. Owner Frank Formica recalls how orders from casinos were like yeast to his dough, lifting his bakery's bottom line ever higher. Then, pummeled by out-of-state competitors, the casinos began to fall into a swoon, and this year, as four of them closed, Formica lost a big chunk of his business "in the blink of an eye. " He is down to 35,000 to 40,000 pieces a day, employs 40, and is sending his trucks ever farther to find new customers.
NEWS
December 3, 2014 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
About 120,000 Philadelphia workers could receive mandatory sick pay if recommendations released Monday to Mayor Nutter become law. Nutter twice vetoed sick-leave legislation, which is widely challenged as cost-prohibitive by the business community. But he reversed his stance in June when he announced the task force along with City Councilman William Greenlee, who has long advocated the measure. "The real winners in this would be those workers that right now do not have paid sick leave and can join growing numbers around the country that have what I believe is a very reasonable benefit," Greenlee said Monday.
NEWS
September 18, 2014
ISSUE | JOBS Ex-Im primes pump As a Washington insider, Heritage Foundation president Jim DeMint seems to think he knows how to run our businesses here in Philadelphia ("Let the Ex-Im Bank expire," Sept. 9). While he may have experience owning a small business, his marketing firm didn't export - which explains why he seemingly doesn't understand that Ex-Im, rather than a form of corporate welfare, means jobs in Philadelphia. In Pennsylvania, Ex-Im Bank supports 285 exporters, 179 of which are small businesses.
NEWS
July 22, 2014
AS LAWMAKERS in Washington haggle over the future of the U.S. Export-Import Bank, Michael Strange has no doubts about where he stands. Strange is owner and president of Bassetts Ice Cream, which has about 25 employees at its Center City headquarters. Exports, mostly to China, account for 20 percent of Bassetts' annual revenue. Ex-Im is an obscure federal agency that helps American businesses, mostly small, sell goods abroad. But some lawmakers - primarily tea party Republicans in the House - want to close down Ex-Im when its authorization ends Sept.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 10 years of paying five employees, plus additional "associates," to staff his Old City business, James R. Domenick is looking for space in the suburbs, and thinking about moving out. It's about taxes, and the pressure the city has felt compelled to exert on small businesses such as Domenick's insurance office to raise money for its cash-strapped public schools. "I am not an antitax person," Domenick told me. "I believe people need to pay for the infrastructure and the services they receive.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Private employers added 281,000 jobs in June, the payroll company ADP reported Wednesday, indicating an economy that seems to be shaking off some of the lingering aftermath of the worst recession since the Great Depression. "It was a great number," said economist Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics in West Chester, analyzing the report for the New Jersey-based ADP. "The gains were broad-based," he said. "Every industry experienced an increase in employment. " Even so, he said, it will be several years before the economy can create enough jobs to return the many long-term jobless to employment.
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