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BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Small business is almost always an issue in presidential campaigns. This year, it's morphed into one of the biggest. Getting the backing of the small-business community is important for most political candidates. Small-company owners are often influencers: They are well-known in their cities and towns and they employ voters with a vested interest in the challenges that they face. The Republican Party and Mitt Romney have been talking about small business for months, focusing on voter concerns such as taxes and health care as small-business issues.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
Small-business owners' concerns about government policies have intensified since the deep recession and a recovery that doesn't feel much better. Karen Kerrigan serves the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council as president, and Raymond Keating is its chief economist. The 18-year-old council, which has 100,000 members, takes a stand similar to other groups: Small businesses are struggling because they have to contend with too many taxes and regulations - words that are coming up a lot in presidential campaign speeches, videos, and commercials.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
By Michael Carroll Too often, we lack balance when we talk about businesses and their owners. I came of age in the late 1960s and early '70s, an out-of-balance time. Back then, a good part of public opinion was very critical of business and business people, sometimes unfairly so. There was a popular song at the time by a guy named Ray Stevens called "Mr. Businessman," and it was pretty rough on folks with that title. Here is a little sample of the lyrics: Itemize the things you covet As you squander through your life Bigger cars, bigger houses Term insurance for your wife Tuesday evenings with your harlot And on Wednesdays it's your charlatan analyst, He's high up on your list Forty years ago, businesses and business people were not widely admired or portrayed very favorably.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
If you own or have owned a small business, what advice would you give to someone just starting out? Send essays of 250 words or less by Feb. 22, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Business at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-454
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Montgomery County Private Industry Council wants to get small business owners involved in big business. The council is sponsoring a conference Wednesday that will introduce small business owners to the opportunities to work with federal and state agencies and large private businesses. "There is so much potential out there for anybody who is interested," said Barry Reimenschneider, procurement specialist for the 6-year-old council. The Government Agency Awareness Reception is scheduled to be held at the Valley Forge Sheraton Convention Center from 8 a.m to noon.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is plenty of consensus on the benefits of keeping it small. One child is easier to handle than three. A two-door sedan is more fuel-efficient than a stretch limousine. And, of course, the gift-giving creed: Good things come in small packages. Then there's the business world. Ask small-business owners how life is and brace yourself for a litany of hardships. Topping the list might be that they don't have time to answer your question. "There are major challenges in running a small business," said Donna Marie DeCarolis, associate dean for graduate programs at Drexel University's LeBow College of Business.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Alan J. Steinberg
The legendary Jersey Devil is a creature that has haunted inhabitants of and visitors to the Pine Barrens. Of course, the Jersey Devil is a myth, despite numerous claims of its authenticity. There is, however, a real-life devil that has hindered small-business creation, development and expansion in New Jersey the last four decades. This creature is the ever-growing burden of federal and state regulation of all types, including environmental, labor and financial regulation. Per employee, all these government mandates have a disproportionate impact on small business.
NEWS
March 16, 2004 | By W. WILSON GOODE Jr
ON THURSDAY, Mayor Street will formally share with City Council his latest vision for his two-term mayoralty. The mayor will offer a partial blueprint for economic growth and will call for an Economic Development Summit to be held this spring. Economic development is a new strategic focus for this administration. But it has always been mine. As a result of my legislative initiatives, on March 25, Council's Commerce and Economic Development Committee will hold hearings to update the status of lending goals submitted by banks holding city money.
NEWS
July 3, 2006 | By Brenda Hopper and Gary Rago
New Jersey needs to increase its financial support for the programs that help small businesses - the backbone of the state's economy - to develop, grow and compete, just as neighboring states have done. Last year, Pennsylvania invested $6.7 million and New York $2.5 million in their small-business development centers. New Jersey spent only $800,000. Even Georgia and North Carolina, states comparable in size to New Jersey, poured more money into their development centers, which are nonprofits that assist with startups, work with business owners on accounting and marketing, and help with business plans and securing contracts.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Commercial lending standards have tightened in the past year for small businesses and scuttled a major portion of contracted transactions for smaller properties, the National Association of Realtors reported Thursday. "There have been notable improvements in capital for large commercial transactions valued at $2.5 million or higher, but there remain significant challenges for small business," said Realtors' chief economist Lawrence Yun. According to Real Capital Analytics, more than 13,000 major properties valued at $2.5 million or higher traded hands in 2011.
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BUSINESS
April 9, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, STAFF WRITER
Pennsylvania is home to 1 million small businesses employing 2.4 million people, while New Jersey boasts 820,303 small companies with 1.7 million employees, according to the Small Business Administration's annual state-by-state profiles released Thursday. In both states, SBA profiles showed, small business represents a little more than 98 percent of all businesses and at or close to 50 percent of all employees. In Pennsylvania, the industries with the most small-business jobs were health care and social assistance, accommodation and food services, and manufacturing, according to the report, compiled by the Office of Advocacy, an independent unit within the SBA. In New Jersey, they were professional, scientific and technical services, "other services," and retail trade.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
Gone are the days in the 1940s and '50s when Clete Cunningham's father opened a welding supply company in what oldtimers call Fishtown, and "there was so much manufacturing in the city that there was plenty of business to go around. " But these days, amid coffee shops and brew pubs, the area has been rebranded as East Kinsington and is becoming a business incubator, nurturing small arts- and tech-based companies. "They are tiny little customers now, but we know from experience that some of them will grow into huge, multimillion dollar corporations," said Cunningham, who leads J.A. Cunningham Equipment Inc., founded in 1946 on Trenton Avenue.
BUSINESS
March 14, 2016 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Staff Writer
When a blizzard blankets a customer's business, making entrance impossible, when a fallen tree blocks a driveway, when leaves or ice clog a drain, flooding the parking lot, landscaper Bob Keller wants to be there for his customers. Which is why Keller said he decided to invest more in his employees by offering 401-K retirement plans to the full-time employees of his small business, R.P. Keller Landscaping Inc. in Wenonah. "It's job security for them and for me," said Keller, 38, who employs six to eight people full time year round and more seasonally.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2016 | By Diane Mastrull, STAFF WRITER
Own a small business and want a piece of the action when the 2016 Democratic National Convention comes to Philadelphia for four days in July? Well here's a start. The Democratic National Convention Committee and Google are holding a series of workshops aimed at helping area small businesses boost their online presence so they have a better shot at capitalizing on the big political event. The first workshop will be held from 9 a.m. to noon on Feb. 3 at the Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts, 300 S. Broad St. Dates for other workshops have not yet been released.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2016 | By Carolyn Hax
Question: I am a childless woman. My husband and I work hard, and we like the way things are in our life. How do I respond when my friends say, "You can't be that busy; you don't have kids"? I am on call 24 hours per day, seven days a week, and my husband works mid-shifts, so we are quite busy. We also run a small business from our home and have pets and other hobbies. I am stunned when I hear this and always feel like I am being excluded on purpose. Do I just let these friends go or what?
NEWS
December 24, 2015 | By Helen Ubinas, Daily News Columnist
WE JUST MIGHT save the city's oldest African-American bookstore. If things keep going the way they have since my column about Hakim's Bookstore - family-owned-and-operated since 1959 - the struggling black literary institution just may be around for another half-century. The response has been overwhelming, said owner Yvonne Blake. People have called and written from all over with memories about the bookstore that was started by Blake's late father, Dawud Hakim. Many, including Tariq "Black Thought" Trotter of the Roots, have shared the story on social media and put out a plea for support under #savehakims.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2015 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
Since its launch last December, Kiva.org/Philadelphia, the crowdfunded small-business, no-interest lending program, has funded 57 loans totaling $261,000. Fund-raising is underway for an additional eight loans totaling $40,000, said Kiva spokesman Jason Riggs. Of the Philadelphia businesses that have received funding, 59 percent are owned by ethnic minorities, Riggs said. To qualify, small businesses create a profile at Kivazip.org, where they outline their business plans and crowdfunding loan goals.
NEWS
November 26, 2015 | By Harry Madonna
The traditional start of the holiday season saw 5.1 million fewer shoppers heading out to the malls and big-box retailers on Black Friday last year, according to the National Retail Federation. Millions of shoppers no longer seem willing to fight traffic, wait in long lines, or do physical battle for early-morning deals on the day after Thanksgiving. Instead, a record number of shoppers are venturing to their local towns and Main Streets in support of Small Business Saturday.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2015
The two visitors from England occupied window seats at HubBub Coffee in Center City on a recent rainy afternoon, huddled over hot drinks and the real reason they had stopped in: free WiFi access. Free for them, but not the coffee shop's owner. When Internet squatters' time at a small business lasts long after they've swallowed the last sip of their caffeinated cover, that WiFi becomes an even pricier perk, said Alan Jacobson. He and friend Jesse Bookspan are out to change that with GuestNet, a software and hardware product that aims to make small-business owners money off every log-on to the WiFi they offer.
NEWS
October 28, 2015 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Kathryn B. Weinrich, 80, the public face of Weinrich's Bakery in Willow Grove and a dedicated volunteer, died Friday, Oct. 23, of Alzheimer's disease at St. Joseph's Manor in Huntingdon Valley. Known as "Kippy," Mrs. Weinrich was born in Atlantic City and grew up in Ventnor, N.J. She graduated from Atlantic City High School, where she met Edward Weinrich. The two married in 1956 and started their life together in Honolulu, where he was serving in the Army. After the couple returned to the Philadelphia area, he worked in the family's bakery business.
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