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BUSINESS
September 11, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
NEW YORK - Small business is almost always an issue in presidential campaigns. This year, it's morphed into one of the biggest. Getting the backing of the small-business community is important for most political candidates. Small-company owners are often influencers: They are well-known in their cities and towns and they employ voters with a vested interest in the challenges that they face. The Republican Party and Mitt Romney have been talking about small business for months, focusing on voter concerns such as taxes and health care as small-business issues.
BUSINESS
September 18, 2012 | By Joyce M. Rosenberg, Associated Press
Small-business owners' concerns about government policies have intensified since the deep recession and a recovery that doesn't feel much better. Karen Kerrigan serves the Small Business & Entrepreneurship Council as president, and Raymond Keating is its chief economist. The 18-year-old council, which has 100,000 members, takes a stand similar to other groups: Small businesses are struggling because they have to contend with too many taxes and regulations - words that are coming up a lot in presidential campaign speeches, videos, and commercials.
NEWS
December 27, 2012
By Michael Carroll Too often, we lack balance when we talk about businesses and their owners. I came of age in the late 1960s and early '70s, an out-of-balance time. Back then, a good part of public opinion was very critical of business and business people, sometimes unfairly so. There was a popular song at the time by a guy named Ray Stevens called "Mr. Businessman," and it was pretty rough on folks with that title. Here is a little sample of the lyrics: Itemize the things you covet As you squander through your life Bigger cars, bigger houses Term insurance for your wife Tuesday evenings with your harlot And on Wednesdays it's your charlatan analyst, He's high up on your list Forty years ago, businesses and business people were not widely admired or portrayed very favorably.
NEWS
February 7, 1999
If you own or have owned a small business, what advice would you give to someone just starting out? Send essays of 250 words or less by Feb. 22, including a phone number for verification, to Community Voices/Business at the addresses listed in the Where to Write box above. Questions? Call Kevin Ferris, readers' editor, at 215-854-454
BUSINESS
May 4, 2012 | Inquirer Staff Report
Commercial lending standards have tightened in the past year for small businesses and scuttled a major portion of contracted transactions for smaller properties, the National Association of Realtors reported Thursday. "There have been notable improvements in capital for large commercial transactions valued at $2.5 million or higher, but there remain significant challenges for small business," said Realtors' chief economist Lawrence Yun. According to Real Capital Analytics, more than 13,000 major properties valued at $2.5 million or higher traded hands in 2011.
NEWS
September 4, 1988 | By David M. Giles, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Montgomery County Private Industry Council wants to get small business owners involved in big business. The council is sponsoring a conference Wednesday that will introduce small business owners to the opportunities to work with federal and state agencies and large private businesses. "There is so much potential out there for anybody who is interested," said Barry Reimenschneider, procurement specialist for the 6-year-old council. The Government Agency Awareness Reception is scheduled to be held at the Valley Forge Sheraton Convention Center from 8 a.m to noon.
NEWS
March 18, 2012 | By Diane Mastrull, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
There is plenty of consensus on the benefits of keeping it small. One child is easier to handle than three. A two-door sedan is more fuel-efficient than a stretch limousine. And, of course, the gift-giving creed: Good things come in small packages. Then there's the business world. Ask small-business owners how life is and brace yourself for a litany of hardships. Topping the list might be that they don't have time to answer your question. "There are major challenges in running a small business," said Donna Marie DeCarolis, associate dean for graduate programs at Drexel University's LeBow College of Business.
NEWS
August 13, 2004 | By Alan J. Steinberg
The legendary Jersey Devil is a creature that has haunted inhabitants of and visitors to the Pine Barrens. Of course, the Jersey Devil is a myth, despite numerous claims of its authenticity. There is, however, a real-life devil that has hindered small-business creation, development and expansion in New Jersey the last four decades. This creature is the ever-growing burden of federal and state regulation of all types, including environmental, labor and financial regulation. Per employee, all these government mandates have a disproportionate impact on small business.
NEWS
March 16, 2004 | By W. WILSON GOODE Jr
ON THURSDAY, Mayor Street will formally share with City Council his latest vision for his two-term mayoralty. The mayor will offer a partial blueprint for economic growth and will call for an Economic Development Summit to be held this spring. Economic development is a new strategic focus for this administration. But it has always been mine. As a result of my legislative initiatives, on March 25, Council's Commerce and Economic Development Committee will hold hearings to update the status of lending goals submitted by banks holding city money.
NEWS
July 3, 2006 | By Brenda Hopper and Gary Rago
New Jersey needs to increase its financial support for the programs that help small businesses - the backbone of the state's economy - to develop, grow and compete, just as neighboring states have done. Last year, Pennsylvania invested $6.7 million and New York $2.5 million in their small-business development centers. New Jersey spent only $800,000. Even Georgia and North Carolina, states comparable in size to New Jersey, poured more money into their development centers, which are nonprofits that assist with startups, work with business owners on accounting and marketing, and help with business plans and securing contracts.
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NEWS
July 22, 2014
AS LAWMAKERS in Washington haggle over the future of the U.S. Export-Import Bank, Michael Strange has no doubts about where he stands. Strange is owner and president of Bassetts Ice Cream, which has about 25 employees at its Center City headquarters. Exports, mostly to China, account for 20 percent of Bassetts' annual revenue. Ex-Im is an obscure federal agency that helps American businesses, mostly small, sell goods abroad. But some lawmakers - primarily tea party Republicans in the House - want to close down Ex-Im when its authorization ends Sept.
BUSINESS
July 7, 2014 | By Joseph N. DiStefano, Inquirer Staff Writer
After 10 years of paying five employees, plus additional "associates," to staff his Old City business, James R. Domenick is looking for space in the suburbs, and thinking about moving out. It's about taxes, and the pressure the city has felt compelled to exert on small businesses such as Domenick's insurance office to raise money for its cash-strapped public schools. "I am not an antitax person," Domenick told me. "I believe people need to pay for the infrastructure and the services they receive.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2014 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Private employers added 281,000 jobs in June, the payroll company ADP reported Wednesday, indicating an economy that seems to be shaking off some of the lingering aftermath of the worst recession since the Great Depression. "It was a great number," said economist Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody's Analytics in West Chester, analyzing the report for the New Jersey-based ADP. "The gains were broad-based," he said. "Every industry experienced an increase in employment. " Even so, he said, it will be several years before the economy can create enough jobs to return the many long-term jobless to employment.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2014
FOR ALL their innovation, American craft brewers are starting to grow stale. Over-hopped beers? Yeah, they were novel . . . about 15 years ago. Now everyone brews a double IPA. Wacky flavors? Used to be we couldn't wait for pumpkin beer each autumn. Now, because there are so many of them competing for shelf space, the pumpkin season starts in two weeks and you'll be sick of them by Labor Day. Barrel-aged beer? Because it takes months and years to properly age and blend beer, barrel-aged beer was once a rarity.
BUSINESS
July 1, 2014 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Columnist
That smiling scrubber continues to clean up. With nearly seven million happy-faced pads sold since its national debut in 2012, Scrub Daddy is now the most successful product in the five-year history of Shark Tank , ABC-TV's competition show for entrepreneurs. On QVC alone, more than 2.5 million Scrub Daddys have sold since April 2012. You can find them at Bed Bath & Beyond and Walmart, as well as in supermarkets. But consumers told the daddy of Scrub Daddy, Voorhees inventor Aaron Krause, that they want more.
NEWS
May 31, 2014 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Pat Gusoff had what Umar Mycka calls "a yard full of trouble" at her Bustleton home. It wasn't so much the honeysuckle, mulberries, bittersweet, chokecherries, and English ivy, although they can be a nasty business. No, it was all those shiny, three-leaf shoots of Toxicodendron radicans, the dreaded poison ivy. Mycka knows this North American scourge intimately from four decades of work as a gardener/groundskeeper at the Philadelphia Zoo. Since 2008, he has also had a small business (idontwantpoisonivy.com)
NEWS
May 25, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
For most of an hour Wednesday morning, Ted Trevorrow sat across the desk from small-business owner John F. McGeever III, asking questions about his workers and group health insurance plan. Trevorrow, a certified Affordable Care Act navigator with Resources for Human Development, was trying to learn whether McGeever had missed something in his Small Business Health Options Program application that would qualify him for tax credits to offset group insurance costs. McGeever was all ears.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
While few major policy differences separate the four Democratic rivals for governor in Tuesday's primary, ROB McCORD 's more than five years as state treasurer make him the best choice. His role in managing more than $120 billion in public funds through the recession has given him an invaluable understanding of fiscal matters that Pennsylvania needs. Bill Green's leaving City Council for the School Reform Commission left a void that MATT WOLFE , an attorney with experience in city and state government, could fill.
NEWS
May 18, 2014 | By Robert Calandra, For The Inquirer
In a gritty industrial park tucked inside a middle-class Bensalem neighborhood, John F. McGeever III is living his dream. Since he was a teenager working for his father in the firm founded by his grandfather in 1929, McGeever wanted nothing more than to own the Charles Schillinger Co. His father sold the company in 1988. Seven years later, McGeever mortgaged everything and bought back the small metal-spinning and fabrication firm. "I always wanted to have the company," said McGeever, 58, a tall, lean, intense man with close-cropped white hair.
NEWS
April 10, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE WORLD has not forgotten about the plight of Philadelphia artist James Dupree, whose vast Mantua studio has been condemned by the city under eminent domain. So far, four filmmakers are producing documentaries on Dupree and his fight against the city, and his supporters are reaching out to Oscar-nominated director Spike Lee, the artist said. On April 26, the 63-year-old artist will open his Dupree Studios, the massive property at the center of the fight, to the world in an event called "Save Dupree Studios: The Dupree Dream.
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