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Small Change

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NEWS
August 5, 1991 | By William H. Sokolic, Special to The Inquirer
Ready for a coed Jackson 5? Mercury Records executives put the word out this spring that Small Change, one of Philadelphia's latest rhythm-and-blues groups, could be just that. "I think Small Change is just as talented as the Jackson 5 when they started out," says Leighton Singleton, director of national R&B sales for Mercury. Small Change, for those who haven't been swept up in the hype emanating from the group's label, consists of four teenage cousins from North Philadelphia: boys Kairi Guinn-Styles and Neamen Howard and girls Lakuana Brockington and Tamika Jarmon.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1987 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
One of director Francois Truffaut's sweetest movies is Small Change (1976), an awestruck look at childhood as a state of grace. Set in a French village with a potentially dangerous high-rise apartment, this enchanting film sees infants, toddlers and whippersnappers as an enormously energetic, curious, resilient and unspoiled species - much more highly advanced than we backward adults. It will be shown at 3:30 and 7:45 p.m. Sunday at the Theater of the Living Arts, 334 South St. ROXY SCREENING ROOMS 2023 Sansom St, 561-0114.
NEWS
December 20, 1987 | By Bob Greene, Special to The Inquirer
There is a vague feeling in the land that everything has gotten screwy during the last 15 years. Countless books, articles and essays have been written about this - most of them delving into the philosophical and theoretical reasons behind the way things have changed. I'm neither a philosopher nor a theoretician. But here in New York I have come upon an example of just how wacky things have become. It's a small example, but I have a feeling that it means something. Let's go back to 1973 for a moment.
NEWS
August 25, 2006 | By Noel Dolan
Near my washer and dryer I keep a ceramic piggy bank that my oldest daughter hand-painted when she was 4. Whenever I find loose change in the wash, I put it in this bank. After two years, I collected just about $30, plus some Japanese yen, a Canadian coin, and a couple of Guardian Angel tokens. Not bad. I was thinking about how this small change adds up when I read recently that a penny now costs more to make than it is worth. There are those who advocate doing away with the penny and making the nickel our coin of least value, working toward a monetary system grounded in fives and tens.
NEWS
October 19, 1995 | For The Inquirer / S.D. ROWAN
Radnor Soccer Club members (from left) John Dougherty, 5; Jordan Bodzin, 5, and Stephen Scott, 6, gather coins in Newtown Square for the Great Penny Drive. The small change collected by the small fry Wednesday will benefit Philadelphia's Ronald McDonald House.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
Like an old man with a cart picking up junk on Ridge Avenue, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is trying to turn scraps of metal into cash. Geithner wants to strip copper and other valuable metals from the Philadelphia and Denver coining lines that mint America's small change. "Currently, the costs of making the penny and the nickel are more than twice the face value of each of those coins," he told a House Appropriations Committee panel Wednesday. Treasury wants a law that would give it the freedom "to change the composition of coins to utilize more cost-effective materials" without having to ask Congress for permission every time it dilutes the content of the national coinage.
NEWS
October 24, 1986
The Oct. 17 issue contained several items relating to the Temple University faculty strike. The most revealing was buried deep in Chuck Newman's column in the sports pages. There an anonymous member of the Board of Trustees is quoted in praise of the performance by Temple's football coach: "What we have to do now is get some more depth so that he can play the schedule we are playing . . . What we have to do now is get deeper-pockets alumni financial support for the program. " Deeper pockets for football at a time when those for faculty salaries and research contain only small change?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
French new waver Francois Truffaut was raised in an orphanage, and the filmmaker's affinity for, and fascination with, outcast children manifests itself in sublime form in The 400 Blows , Small Change , and The Wild Child . The latter, released in 1970 (but with the look and feel of something far older and more formal in approach), returns to the big screen. Based on accounts of a boy found roaming naked and feral in the forests of southern France in the late 18th century, The Wild Child stars Truffaut himself as Jean Itard, the doctor who takes the boy, first presumed deaf and mute, into his home and patiently, determinedly, socializes and schools him. Jean-Pierre Cargol is the kid, and his autistic-like mannerisms and scrawny ferocity are utterly convincing.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The way Frank Ames saw it, the choice of jobs was about equal: flipping hamburgers at Burger King or McDonald's or collecting taxes for the Abington school board. The pay was the same. Ames, the Rockledge tax collector, made an impassioned plea to the board last week for an increase in his salary, saying the pay he received for collecting the district's taxes was ridiculously low. "You're expecting me to be responsible for $1 million (in taxes), and I don't see that as small change, and you provide the princely sum of $2,300," he said.
NEWS
April 13, 1993 | By Gail Stephanie Miles, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Four churches were burglarized over the Easter weekend in Collingswood, including one that had been hit during another spate of church burglaries in Camden County a week before. Police said that the four houses of worship - Collingswood Presbyterian Church, at Fern and Maple Avenues; St. Paul's Lutheran Church, Park and Dill Avenues; Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, Haddon and Fern Avenues; and Bible Presbyterian Church, Fern and Maple Avenues - all were broken into between 10 p.m. Saturday and 6:30 a.m. Sunday.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 25, 2015 | BY JASON NARK, Daily News Staff Writer narkj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5916
THE LITTLEST CHANGES inside one small household - a faster shower, a lighter meal, a different light bulb - could ripple out into the human family across the earth. That was the message Cardinal Peter Turkson, president of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace, told a large audience at the World Meeting of Families yesterday afternoon at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. Turkson, a Ghanaian, is considered to be the public face of Pope Francis' war on global warming, and he reiterated a message the leader of the Catholic Church hopes to drive home with followers.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 22, 2015 | By A.D. Amorosi, For The Inquirer
Onetime Philadelphian Melody Gardot, a jazz folkie with a Billie Holiday-like quiver to her voice, had a personal misfortune that might have spelled the end of a music career. Now 30, the pianist, then a fashion major at Community College of Philadelphia, was struck by a sport-utility vehicle in 2003, an accident that shattered her pelvis and left her with extreme photosensitivity, as well as autonomic nervous system dysfunction that makes her hypersensitive to loud noise. It's hard not to read that backstory into the quirky calm of Gardot albums - spare, reedy efforts like 2008's Worrisome Heart and 2009's My One and Only Thrill , or the lush, samba-inflected The Absence of 2012.
NEWS
October 17, 2012 | BY JEFF ROSENBERG
I AM A VETERAN Philadelphia public-school teacher who is on sabbatical, and short of burying my head in the dirt the last two weeks there was no avoiding the brouhaha regarding a student wearing a "Romney-Ryan" T-shirt on dress-down day and comments her teacher admittedly made to her at a Philadelphia public high school. I would like to chime in with some additional perspective pertaining to the teaching profession. Like George W. Bush has said on numerous occasions about the presidency, "This is a hard job. " The craft of teaching is science with research-based curriculum, lesson plans and best practices, but it is also art with an intuitive sense for putting the science successfully into practice and making it work.
NEWS
March 29, 2012
Like an old man with a cart picking up junk on Ridge Avenue, Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner is trying to turn scraps of metal into cash. Geithner wants to strip copper and other valuable metals from the Philadelphia and Denver coining lines that mint America's small change. "Currently, the costs of making the penny and the nickel are more than twice the face value of each of those coins," he told a House Appropriations Committee panel Wednesday. Treasury wants a law that would give it the freedom "to change the composition of coins to utilize more cost-effective materials" without having to ask Congress for permission every time it dilutes the content of the national coinage.
SPORTS
October 18, 2010 | By Phil Sheridan, Inquirer Columnist
Sometimes you can start a rock slide by knocking just a couple of pebbles loose. Charlie Manuel likes it when the runs are rolling down on opposing pitchers like boulders. He has seen his regular lineup, these players hitting in their usual order, do that often enough that he's very slow to make significant changes. So it was noteworthy Sunday afternoon when Manuel posted the lineup for Game 2 of the National League Championship Series. Chase Utley, whose name is permanently visible in the No. 3 spot on the dry-erase board in the Phillies' clubhouse, was moved up to the No. 2 spot.
NEWS
April 19, 2010 | By Lou Anne Bulik
What is it about Greg Mortenson's story of building schools in remote areas of Pakistan and Afghanistan that seems to resonate so deeply? To be sure, Mortenson's books, Three Cups of Tea and Stones into Schools, which tell the story of Americans working with Pakistani and Afghan villagers to build schools, take the reader on armchair adventures in exotic locations with a colorful cast of characters. But I would suggest that Mortenson's books resonate so deeply for another reason.
BUSINESS
June 10, 2009 | By Stacey Burling INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It seems like a small change - and an obvious one - but it forced architect Robert Mainwaring to completely rethink his design of the new pavilion at Paoli Hospital. Hospital leaders, who were converts to a new trend in health care called evidence-based design, wanted to see if they could prevent falls by making it easier for patients to walk to the bathroom. Traditionally, patients have had to walk all the way across their rooms, often through a maze of equipment and furniture, to get to the toilet.
NEWS
April 2, 2009 | MICHAEL SMERCONISH
WHAT'S it take to be a good cop? Last week, I'd have said only a hairy eyeball. But two cases playing out on opposite sides of the country may prove me wrong. First, consider the dismissal of Police Officer David Agostino of Collier Township, a Pittsburgh suburb. Last week, a state appeals court upheld the Collier Township Board of Commissioners' decision to discharge Agostino after an off-duty motorcycle accident left him without the ability to smell. Commonwealth Court Judge Bernard McGinley deemed it "a physical disability" that rendered Agostino "unfit to serve as a police officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2009 | By Steven Rea INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
French new waver Francois Truffaut was raised in an orphanage, and the filmmaker's affinity for, and fascination with, outcast children manifests itself in sublime form in The 400 Blows, Small Change, and The Wild Child. The latter, released in 1970 (but with the look and feel of something far older and more formal in approach), returns to the big screen. Based on accounts of a boy found roaming naked and feral in the forests of southern France in the late 18th century, The Wild Child stars Truffaut himself as Jean Itard, the doctor who takes the boy, first presumed deaf and mute, into his home and patiently, determinedly, socializes and schools him. Jean-Pierre Cargol is the kid, and his autistic-like mannerisms and scrawny ferocity are utterly convincing.
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