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November 11, 2012 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
The other day, The Inquirer published the football rushing leaders in South Jersey entering the weekend, and there was one distinct trend: the overwhelming presence of runners from South Jersey Group 1. Five of the top 10, including the first three, were from Group 1 schools, which brings us to the coming playoffs. In many years, the smallest-enrollment group has one or two major contenders, but looking at this season's field is like scanning the list of top rushers - there are plenty from which to choose.
NEWS
February 15, 2012 | BY JASON NARK, narkj@phillynews.com 215-854-5916
HORSES AROUND the country can neigh a sigh of relief. The owners of Atlantic City's Steel Pier, facing pressure from animal-rights groups, have scrapped a plan to bring back the diving-horse act that made the boardwalk venue famous for decades. "Instead of trying to rekindle the past, we're going to preserve history and nostalgia in a new way," said Anthony Catanoso, Steel Pier's president. Diving horses began plunging off Steel Pier platforms into pools in the 1920s.
NEWS
August 11, 1993 | Inquirer photographs by Elizabeth Malby
A small group of clergy and the public gathered yesterday for a seminar on hate crimes convened by the Missionary Baptist Pastors' Conference of Philadelphia and Vicinity. The gathering, at Childs Memorial Baptist Church, followed recent interracial crimes in the city. A rally was planned last night.
NEWS
July 20, 1989 | Special to The Inquirer / JILL ANNA GREENBERG
STOPPING TO EXAMINE A FLOWER, Naturalist Robert Mercer (left) tries not to think about the intruding boat in the Delaware River. Mercer was leading a nature walk for a small group at Neshaminy State Park in Bensalem Saturday. Mercer (above) holds bones from what he said he believed were a bird and a small mammal.
NEWS
April 10, 2007
THANKS for displaying the wonderful story of the Philadelphia students standing tall in the National Moot Court Competition on the front page. The story by Valerie Russ was inspiring. We too often read of negative events involving high school students caused by a relatively small group. Let's give good kids some more encouragement and recognition as they face the challenges of life. Jim Lowney Toms River, N.J.
NEWS
March 3, 2010 | By John Sutherland
The health-care debate in Washington is now in its 11th month, and yet it has rarely focused on the huge economic burden the current system imposes on America's largest employers: small businesses. Congress has treated the economy and health-care reform as if they were separate issues on parallel tracks that never converge. But the fact is that our current "jobless recovery" - if in fact it is a recovery - will remain jobless until Washington acknowledges that the two problems are intimately linked, and that there will be little private-sector job creation until something meaningful is done about health insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2012 | By Molly Eichel and Daily News Staff Writer
WHEN ERICA HAWTHORNE, a/k/a RhapsodE, was making her album "Spoken Inward," she was put in a tough position. With limited funds — meaning limited time in a studio — she had to choose. She could perfect a song or not go into massive debt paying studio bills. Hawthorne knows firsthand how far a couple hundred bucks can take an artist. It's why she thought up her innovative microgrant program, Small But Mighty Arts Grant, which gives Philly artists — from painters to DJs to spoken-word phenoms — a chance to receive from $200 to $1,000 to help with a project that will significantly affect their careers.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | by Reed Johnson, Los Angeles Daily News
Walt Disney Co. chairman and CEO Michael Eisner said Sunday that the boycott of Disney initiated by members of the Southern Baptist Convention was the work of "a very small group" whose "extreme" views did not represent those of most Americans. Representatives of the Southern Baptist Convention voted for the Disney boycott June 12 at the group's annual meeting in New Orleans, citing what they termed Disney's "anti-Christian and anti-family trend. " At the time, Disney issued a terse, two-sentence reply, which Eisner amplified on Sunday.
NEWS
August 18, 2005
ONE can immediately foresee the numerous responses from Bush lovers to Bryan Kilpatrick's Aug. 15 letter. Quite frankly, I'm surprised the Daily News printed his letter at all. Bryan, what you said are not "conspiracy theories," it's the deep, dark ugly truth - something Bush apologists refuse to hear. Bottom line: Bin Laden is George's bogeyman. If he's caught, there's nothing else to scare people with and the public's attention is focused on his beyond lousy performance as "president" (while the conservative media has helped him every step of the way)
NEWS
February 26, 1987
I would like to point out that a recent Letter to the Editor entitled "Forgotten war" is rather out of character with the true facts surrounding the drive to build a national Korean War memorial. Long before Charles McCarren formed his group, a disabled veteran by the name of Bill Temple of Bryn Mawr was interviewed by Frank Rossi of The Inquirer concerning Mr. Temple's intense efforts to build a Korean War memorial. Mr. Temple's efforts have never ended to this day. Other articles have been written about Mr. Temple, and the small group of individuals who finally succeeded, after years of effort, in convincing Congress to pass House Bill 2205.
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NEWS
June 21, 2015 | By Aubrey Whelan, Inquirer Staff Writer
Standing on Independence Mall on Friday afternoon, Mannwell Glenn doused two Confederate flags with lighter fluid and stood back to watch as the flames licked at the fabric. "If you burn a Confederate flag, to some people, that's painful," he had said earlier to a small cluster of TV news cameras. "But whatever you're feeling about us burning your sacred flag, we feel that about 100 times more when nine people are killed. " The deaths of nine people at a historically black church in Charleston, S.C. - killed by a white gunman who reportedly told police he wanted to start a race war - had been weighing on him, he said.
NEWS
May 4, 2014 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
KENNETT SQUARE The Cinco de Mayo festival in Kennett Square started in a parking lot. Behind the library, a few representatives from local nonprofits sat at tables and pushed their good causes to the few hundred who showed up. On Sunday, 13 years later, at least 15,000 are expected to crowd the Chester County borough for this year's festivities, now held on Kennett Square's main street. The festival, which commemorates the Mexican army's victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, has become a streetscape of colorful costumes, foods, and music, and it is in the throes of a transition, just like the group that organizes it. The members of Casa de las Culturas (House of Cultures)
NEWS
January 24, 2014
WHETHER it's craft-brewery cans or longnecks of Yuengling, beer has long dominated the barroom conversation in Philadelphia, leading to one of the most sophisticated draft-tower environments in the country. Cocktails, too, have found a permanent foothold in the sipping landscape, with a small but smart roster of savvy drink-crafters earning attention for their efforts. So, where does that leave wine? Unfairly relegated to the bottom of the list, at least in terms of how often the topic leaps off the nuanced tongues of local drinkers.
NEWS
October 13, 2013 | By Tricia L. Nadolny, Inquirer Staff Writer
A small group of protesters huddled in the pouring rain outside U.S. Rep. Patrick Meehan's office in Springfield, Delaware County, office Friday and urged him to help end the government shutdown. Their message to the Delaware County Republican: You're vulnerable, and don't forget it. "If Rep. Meehan decides to follow party ideology instead of standing with his constituents on this critical issue, Rep. Meehan can be sure constituents like me will not forget this moment once Election Day rolls around in 2014," Innes Forbes, 62, of Ridley Park, said to the group of about 20 people.
NEWS
June 30, 2013
3 plane crash victims found ANCHORAGE, Alaska - Officials have confirmed that three people have been found dead in the wreckage of a small plane south of Cantwell in the Alaska Range. National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Clint Johnson said preliminary information indicated the pilot was the plane's registered owner. No names or hometowns were released pending notification of relatives. The Federal Aviation Administration says that the twin-engine Beechcraft BE55 crashed about 11:45 a.m. Friday near the Summit Airport en route from Fairbanks International Airport to Homer.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Alan Fram, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An IRS manager and self-described conservative Republican said the close scrutiny of tea party groups' tax forms originated in his Cincinnati IRS office and not in Washington, according to a full transcript of his interview by congressional investigators released Tuesday. John Shafer, who oversaw a small group of IRS workers who screen applications for tax-exempt status, told the investigators that the initial tea party application was spotted by one of his workers in February 2010.
NEWS
May 22, 2013 | By John Mooney, NJ SPOTLIGHT
For the last two years, the meeting held monthly in a bare Trenton conference room determined the fates of hundreds of New Jersey public employees, including scores of teachers and school administrators. But the process has nothing to do with disciplinary actions or tenure or anything like that. The meetings of the five-member Employee Residency Review Committee are all about where people can live if they want to hold onto their jobs. Under the New Jersey First Act, enacted in 2011, all New Jersey public employees must reside in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 25, 2013
George Lowe, 89, the last surviving climber from the team that made the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, has died, his wife said Thursday. Mary Lowe said her husband died Wednesday at a nursing home in Ripley, central England, after an illness. Mr. Lowe and his friend Edmund Hillary were the only two New Zealanders on the 1953 British-led attempt to climb the world's highest peak. Mr. Lowe was part of a small group that established the final camp 1,000 feet below the mountain's summit on May 28, 1953.
NEWS
January 25, 2013 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
With perfect SAT scores and on full scholarship at the University of Pennsylvania, Thomas J. Hartford had a bright future and the brightest of outlooks. "He lived life to the fullest," his father said. But that life came to a tragic end Wednesday after Hartford, 22, a senior from Stroudsburg, Pa., suffered a massive stroke following an apparent fall on campus nearly two weeks ago. Hartford's body was found in a pool of blood on a concrete surface outside the Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity house about 1:30 a.m. Jan. 10, said his father, Thomas W. His son had attended a gathering for potential fraternity members on the evening of Jan. 9, Thomas Hartford said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2012
DEAR ABBY: I'm a 51-year-old man. Three years ago, my first and only marriage ended after 20 years. Over the past two years, I have been in a wonderful relationship with a very bright woman, "Toni," who told me she had been married twice before. A year ago, her job required that she move out of state, but we have successfully maintained the long-distance relationship. A few days ago, I learned by chance that she was briefly married a third time while she was in her early 20s. I'm having a difficult time with this news - not for the additional marriage, but for the fact that she chose not to share it with me. I have bared my soul to her and thought she had done the same.
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