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Small Intestine

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NEWS
April 29, 1992 | by Dr. Peter H. Gott, Special to the Daily News
Q: I'm a 35-year-old female diagnosed with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. I've recently had 14 polyps removed from my small intestine, all of which were benign. My doctor tells me this syndrome produces a higher incidence of certain types of cancer. Can you fill in the blanks? A: Peutz-Jeghers syndrome is an uncommon inherited tendency to polyps, or benign growths, in the small intestine and stomach. Patients with this congenital disorder often exhibit areas of bluish-black discoloration in and around the mouth.
NEWS
November 2, 1987 | By Denise-Marie Santiago, Inquirer Staff Writer (The Associated Press contributed to this article.)
Doctors were "cautiously optimistic" yesterday about the recovery of a 3- year-old girl who underwent an experimental operation over the weekend in Pittsburgh to replace her liver, small intestine, pancreas and parts of the stomach and colon. Tabatha Foster of Madisonville, Ky., was listed in critical condition in the intensive-care unit of Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh after the surgery, which lasted 14 hours and 45 minutes. The operation began Saturday at 10 p.m. and ended at 12:45 p.m. yesterday.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For the last six months, I've had two attacks of small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions. I've been told that there's nothing I can do to prevent future attacks. Can you elaborate on this subject? Answer: Unfortunately, there's not much you can do to prevent the recurrence of those painful, pesky, periodic obstructions to one or more loops of bowel that make up the small intestine. Adhesions are areas of tough, fibrous scar tissue that develop in the abdomen as a result of prior surgery like an appendectomy or gall bladder removal.
SPORTS
May 21, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Jacksonville Jaguars receiver Jimmy Smith, out of the hospital after abdominal surgery, plans to play this season. "I'm suiting up next fall," Smith told the Florida Times-Union of Jacksonville after being released this weekend after 19 days in two hospitals. The 32-year-old player had two operations in early April to repair scar tissue and remove an obstruction to his small intestine. Those were remnants of intestinal surgery and an appendectomy he had in 1993. He was readmitted to the hospital April 28 and the Jaguars said it was because his recovery had been slower than expected.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Q: When I wake up, my stomach is bloated and full of gas. The gas I pass is loud and long, and embarrassing, but it hurts if I hold it in. What can I do about it? A: First, some gas in the gastrointestinal tract is absolutely normal. It is estimated the average healthy person passes gas around 10 to 20 times a day! Gas in the small and large intestines usually comes from the action of bacteria on one's food. Bacteria use food for energy and produce various gases such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide.
NEWS
November 1, 1993 | By Nathan Gorenstein, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A pioneer in surgical weight loss, Dr. Manrico A. Troncelliti, 77, of Bryn Mawr, died Thursday at Sacred Heart Hospital in Norristown. Dr. Troncelliti, originally from Norristown, received national attention in 1965 after he developed an intestinal bypass operation that allowed seriously obese patients to lose a hundred pounds or more. According to a 1965 article in the New York Times, "the purpose of the surgery is to disconnect and bypass most of the small intestine," thereby sharply reducing the amount of fat digested by the body.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
J.J. was a fighter. Born with a twisted intestine that went undetected until he collapsed at age 6, Gerald "J.J. " Wilcher Jr., of West Philadelphia, survived for four years without a small intestine and with a deteriorated liver. He moved to Omaha last summer to have a liver/intestine transplant. The new intestine had to be removed in October, however, so he was waiting for another intestine transplant. Over Memorial Day weekend, he danced to a rap song at a barbecue.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
The Chester County district attorney announced yesterday that a 16-month- old girl who died in December was the victim of a homicide and did not die a natural death, as the county coroner's office had concluded in its initial autopsy. Dejane Nicole Carroll-Burnett was killed by "blunt force abdominal trauma" that severed her small intestine, according to Richard T. Callery, the chief medical examiner for the state of Delaware. That means she was struck in the lower torso either by a fist or a blunt instrument, according to Callery.
NEWS
April 17, 1995 | By Edward A. Robinson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
In January, the Chester County coroner concluded that 16-month-old Nicole Dejane Carroll Burnett died a natural death after her small intestine ruptured, and closed the case. Now, county officials aren't so sure. Two weeks ago, Nicole's seven-month-old brother was hospitalized with severe injuries that doctors say came from an indisputable case of child abuse, prompting a reexamination of Nicole's autopsy report. It shows possible indications that she, too, was abused, and has raised a disturbing question: Why weren't the authorities notified in December that Nicole might have been a victim of abuse?
SPORTS
August 25, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
San Diego Chargers coach Bobby Ross underwent surgery last night to relieve pressure from scar tissue that was pinching his small intestine and causing pain. Team spokesman Bill Johnston said Ross could remain at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., for four to five days, meaning he'll miss tonight's exhibition finale against the St. Louis Rams. Offensive coordinator Ralph Friedgen will fill in for Ross. Trainer Keoki Kamau said the problem stemmed from an appendectomy performed on Ross some 35 years ago. "As it was explained to me by the physician, the scar tissue came over and started to entrap the small intestine," Kamau said.
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NEWS
January 11, 2015 | By Dr. Nancy Young, For The Inquirer
A middle-aged man came to Einstein Medical Center Philadelphia after enduring seven months of diarrhea and joint pain. He'd lost a great deal of weight, even though his diet was normal. A physical examination showed him to be severely debilitated, with muscle wasting and a markedly distended abdomen. Four liters of fluid were removed from his abdomen for therapeutic and diagnostic purposes. The most common causes of that kind of fluid accumulation - called ascites - are liver disease, kidney disease, and malignancy.
NEWS
July 28, 2013
Q: When I wake up, my stomach is bloated and full of gas. The gas I pass is loud and long, and embarrassing, but it hurts if I hold it in. What can I do about it? A: First, some gas in the gastrointestinal tract is absolutely normal. It is estimated the average healthy person passes gas around 10 to 20 times a day! Gas in the small and large intestines usually comes from the action of bacteria on one's food. Bacteria use food for energy and produce various gases such as methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide.
NEWS
March 26, 2012 | By Mitchell Hecht, For The Inquirer
Question: For the last six months, I've had two attacks of small bowel obstruction caused by adhesions. I've been told that there's nothing I can do to prevent future attacks. Can you elaborate on this subject? Answer: Unfortunately, there's not much you can do to prevent the recurrence of those painful, pesky, periodic obstructions to one or more loops of bowel that make up the small intestine. Adhesions are areas of tough, fibrous scar tissue that develop in the abdomen as a result of prior surgery like an appendectomy or gall bladder removal.
NEWS
December 10, 2006 | By Josh Goldstein INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Nicole Petro is thrilled with what she's getting for Christmas this year. The 18-year-old high-school senior is scheduled for gastric bypass surgery five days before Christmas at Barix Clinics of Pennsylvania in Langhorne. At 5 feet, 7 inches tall and 265 pounds, Petro hopes the operation will succeed where diet and other weight-loss programs failed her. "It's about my future," said Petro, who has been dreaming of having the surgery since she was 15. "I've had a weight problem for eight years.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 18, 2003 | By Tanya Barrientos INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Outraged by the foul language and off-color comments uttered during the 30th annual American Music Awards, Patricia Heaton of Everybody Loves Raymond stormed out of the auditorium before announcing the act she was there to present. In an interview with her hometown Cleveland newspaper, the Plain Dealer, Heaton said she was disgusted by "an onslaught of lewd jokes and off-color remarks" by the show's hosts, the Osbournes, and many of the presenters. The show was broadcast Monday on ABC. Describing her experience, Heaton said, "I was going to present what's called a video package - a look at 30 years of the American Music Awards.
SPORTS
May 21, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Jacksonville Jaguars receiver Jimmy Smith, out of the hospital after abdominal surgery, plans to play this season. "I'm suiting up next fall," Smith told the Florida Times-Union of Jacksonville after being released this weekend after 19 days in two hospitals. The 32-year-old player had two operations in early April to repair scar tissue and remove an obstruction to his small intestine. Those were remnants of intestinal surgery and an appendectomy he had in 1993. He was readmitted to the hospital April 28 and the Jaguars said it was because his recovery had been slower than expected.
SPORTS
May 1, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
Richmond Webb, a former Pro Bowl offensive lineman with the Miami Dolphins, agreed yesterday to a three-year, $9 million contract with the Cincinnati Bengals. Webb, 34, would be the likely starter at left tackle, a position that has been a problem for the Bengals. For 10 seasons, he protected former Miami quarterback Dan Marino's blind side. "I think, with the money they're paying him, they're planning on him being a starter," Webb's agent, Steve Zucker, said of the Bengals.
SPORTS
January 24, 2000 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Sebastian Janikowski, Florida State's two-time all-American kicker, was arrested at a nightclub early yesterday in Tallahassee, Fla., and accused of attempting to bribe a police officer into releasing his roommate, Aaron Silverman. The arrest was yet another problem with the law for the championship Florida State team. Bribery is a third-degree felony, but it is up to the state Attorney General's Office to charge Janikowski officially. Police said he might be charged with greater or lesser offenses.
SPORTS
August 25, 1995 | Daily News Wire Services
San Diego Chargers coach Bobby Ross underwent surgery last night to relieve pressure from scar tissue that was pinching his small intestine and causing pain. Team spokesman Bill Johnston said Ross could remain at Scripps Memorial Hospital in La Jolla, Calif., for four to five days, meaning he'll miss tonight's exhibition finale against the St. Louis Rams. Offensive coordinator Ralph Friedgen will fill in for Ross. Trainer Keoki Kamau said the problem stemmed from an appendectomy performed on Ross some 35 years ago. "As it was explained to me by the physician, the scar tissue came over and started to entrap the small intestine," Kamau said.
NEWS
June 14, 1995 | by Myung Oak Kim, Daily News Staff Writer Staff writer Gloria Campisi contributed to this report
J.J. was a fighter. Born with a twisted intestine that went undetected until he collapsed at age 6, Gerald "J.J. " Wilcher Jr., of West Philadelphia, survived for four years without a small intestine and with a deteriorated liver. He moved to Omaha last summer to have a liver/intestine transplant. The new intestine had to be removed in October, however, so he was waiting for another intestine transplant. Over Memorial Day weekend, he danced to a rap song at a barbecue.
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