CollectionsSmall Plates
IN THE NEWS

Small Plates

FEATURED ARTICLES
FOOD
June 1, 2006 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
The small-plate movement is growing beyond its ethnic roots in Spanish bar food, Greek meze, and Chinese dim sum. It is becoming a new serving style, one in which you the diner can order-as-you-go, as your tastes and appetite move you: small plates and small portions, foods ordered by the piece. Foods meant to be tasted and shared. It is a change articulated by several local chefs and restaurateurs at a panel discussion last week at Positano Coast. They are, we were told, responding to customers' desires as diners ask for small plates, and want to order by the piece or to share dishes.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 2009 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
When the Moon Goddess of Manayunk is listening to this prayer - the full Thai lullaby is spelled out with 18,600 copper nails artfully tapped into the wall at MangoMoon - chef Nongyao "Moon" Krapugthong can see it work. The customers pour into her snazzy new small-plate Asian pub, and as warm currents of lemongrass-scented air rise from the grill fires in her open kitchen, the big copper sculpture of a moon dangling overhead starts to spin in the spice-tinged breeze. It hasn't spun quite as fast, honestly, as Krapugthong might have hoped when she opened for business in late December.
NEWS
November 11, 2007 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
In their final months at the William Penn Inn, where they worked to save for their big debut, it must have been a challenge for Joe and Amy McAtee to imagine the flight of modern fancy that would become Honey. The William Penn, in Gwynedd, is as classic as it gets - an enormous 1714 inn where the service is stodgy black-tie and the culinary high points (veal Oscar and snapper soup) are fossils from the Prime Rib-a-zoic era. The McAtees are grateful to the William Penn for the work, and respectful of its tradition.
NEWS
May 25, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
Many an ambitious young chef has gotten lost in the uncharted wilderness of fusion cooking, where the path between inspiration and incoherent nonsense is perilously narrow. One minute they're adding an Asian lacquer to their duck confit with a salsa verde flourish (a perfectly fine idea). Next thing you know, they're crumbling fried pork-skin crispies atop the chocolate gelato - an Iron Chef-like fantasy, no doubt, but one that in reality tastes as awful as it sounds. So it's no wonder the fusion trend, after a couple of decades in fierce flower, has been evolving to a more sensible ebb. The focus has shifted to updating authentic dishes with good ingredients and contemporary techniques, rather than simply grabbing a jumble of flavors out of context and reassembling them just because you can. It seems that Ben Byruch, though, has other ideas.
FOOD
June 7, 2007 | By Marilynn Marter INQUIRER FOOD WRITER
When outdoor dining tables were added recently at Jake's restaurant in Manayunk, chef-owner Bruce Cooper quickly realized that successful dining alfresco would require a separate menu. Sidewalk diners, he learned, tend to be younger, looking for lighter, more casual fare, and more impulse-driven than those reserving tables for his more formal indoor meals. Attracting new customers to those outdoor tables, he found, involved offering foods that could be served and eaten more quickly.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | Jason Wilson
DEAR VERY HIP City Restaurateur: I think it's time we had another talk. It's about your small plates. Well, not specifically the plates themselves — some of which, if we're being honest, stretch the definition of "small. " Rather, what we need to talk about is the manner in which these plates are brought to the table. Your "coursing," to use the au courant terminology — or more precisely, your lack thereof. You know what I'm talking about: Two of us show up at your restaurant and your chirpy server suggests that we order two "or three or four" small plates per person.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2008 | By APRIL LISANTE, For the Daily News
GROWING UP in an Italian family, cooking was second nature for Marc Vetri. His paternal grandfather, an immigrant from Sicily, settled in Abington in the 1920s and started a family - and a host of cooking traditions. Marc was born in the '60s, and soon he was spending his weekends helping his grandmother Jenny make everything from fried smelts to ricotta cheesecake. But it wasn't until he'd graduated from Drexel University in 1990, with a degree in finance and a fierce love for guitar-playing, that Vetri realized that cooking was his life's passion.
FOOD
March 22, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I hope you avoided drinking green beer during the St. Paddy's Day debauchery. If you were partying at a bar with a porta-potty parked outside, that wasn't a good sign. I celebrated with a snifter of Redbreast and my annual brown-bread bake-day - thanks to this Ballymaloe recipe I got from Simon Pearce many years ago. (Find recipe here.) Reader: Enjoyed your article about Anne Willan and her husband who have a large cookbook collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1998 | By Gerald Etter, INQUIRER FOOD EDITOR
New restaurants in Old City are becoming old hat. So what's new? Helena's, a new place at an old spot on the corner of Front and Chestnut Streets. That's what's new. Not just in the sense that it opened only a couple of months ago, but in a refreshing kind of way. You won't be overwhelmed by an endless array of menu items, but you will be impressed with the depth of tastes a mere handful of dishes can present. Years ago, the first H.A. Winston's was born here, and over time the building played host to a number of short-lived restaurants.
FOOD
October 16, 2008 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
A tied house, in the traditional sense, is a pub that buys its beer exclusively from one brewery. The Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board does not allow them. When father-and-son William and Chris Leonard of the General Lafayette Inn, a Lafayette Hill brewpub, sought to open such a gastropub downtown, they relied on William's wife, Rose, and son Jonathan to obtain the restaurant license. So that's why the General Lafayette and the cozy Tiedhouse - which opened last week in the ground floor of the CityView Condos near the Art Museum (2001 Hamilton St., 215-561-1002)
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
October 25, 2013 | MICHAEL KLEIN, philly.com
After nearly two years and $3.5 million, developer Stanislaw "Stosh" Stachowski has opened Royal Cracovia , his Eastern Euro restaurant/bakery/banquet hall in Magnolia, Camden County (510 S. White Horse Pike, Magnolia, 856-282-3300; www.royalcracovia.com ). It's across from Magnolia Garden Village. Dinner is served from a menu roughly as large as a phone book; breakfast and lunch are to debut Friday. One of the most intriguing aspects is something the public won't see: a pierogi lab in the basement.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2013
It's been a year since Paris Wine Bar (2303 Fairmount Ave., 215-978-4545) opened in Fairmount, and it's time to celebrate. From 7 p.m.-midnight Saturday, owners Terry Berch McNally and Chef Michael McNally will throw a masquerade party. Chef will debut a new blackboard menu of $5 small plates to complement one of the many Pennsylvania-produced wines served here. Stop the presses! Goldenberg's Peanut Chews needs a headline - 10 little words that describe the iconic candy and its Philadelphia roots.
SPORTS
December 23, 2012
Q. I have a 14-year-old son who is looking to lift weights in addition to basketball practice. When is a good age to start? - Plymouth Dad A: Now would be a good time, dad, but he needs to start with the proper supervision of a good weight trainer. At his age he doesn't need to bulk up, just have him work on technique and getting familiar with all the equipment and what is best for each muscle group. You want to see him get toned and develop reasonable muscle mass for his age. Your son also needs to do more in a gym than just pump iron.
FOOD
December 13, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
Fond , the ambitious BYOB, has moved into a new space nearby, just off Passyunk Avenue, on the corner of 11th and Tasker Streets (1537 S. 11th St., 215-551-5000). Owners chef Lee Styer, Jessie Prawlucki, and Tory Keomanivong pick up a liquor license, a seven-seat bar (two beers on tap, three by the bottle; seven bottles of red, seven bottles of white; five of each by the glass, plus mixed drinks), and a 10-or-so-seat chef's table. They have not said what will become of their previous location.
FOOD
August 31, 2012 | By Michael Klein, Inquirer Columnist
A few restaurant veterans have gathered near the crossroads of Routes 73 and 313 in central Montgomery County. The Asian BYOB FuziOn has closed, and in its place is now Gracie's Cafe (2960 Skippack Pike, Worcester, 610-584-6958), a light and airy BYOB whose menu tackles Asian and Mediterranean cuisines. It's open for dinner daily. Buu Ly, who created FuziOn and later sold it, is the owner. To manage, he's brought in Ian Mark, a former owner of the downtown destinations Cibo and Ciboulette and the Shore spot Red Chopstix, and Billy Wong, whose past includes eponymous restaurants in Old City and Warminster, Plate in Northern Liberties, as well as Tang's on South Street and Mustard Greens in Queen Village.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 2012 | Jason Wilson
DEAR VERY HIP City Restaurateur: I think it's time we had another talk. It's about your small plates. Well, not specifically the plates themselves — some of which, if we're being honest, stretch the definition of "small. " Rather, what we need to talk about is the manner in which these plates are brought to the table. Your "coursing," to use the au courant terminology — or more precisely, your lack thereof. You know what I'm talking about: Two of us show up at your restaurant and your chirpy server suggests that we order two "or three or four" small plates per person.
FOOD
March 22, 2012
Here is an excerpt from Craig LaBan's online chat: Craig LaBan: I hope you avoided drinking green beer during the St. Paddy's Day debauchery. If you were partying at a bar with a porta-potty parked outside, that wasn't a good sign. I celebrated with a snifter of Redbreast and my annual brown-bread bake-day - thanks to this Ballymaloe recipe I got from Simon Pearce many years ago. (Find recipe here.) Reader: Enjoyed your article about Anne Willan and her husband who have a large cookbook collection.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2012
HOW MUCH tapas is too much tapas? My dining companion asked me this question as we ate and drank at Marcie Turney and Valerie Safran's new tapas spot, Jamonera. Now, before I answer that, a confession: I love Spain; I love tapas. Some of the best nights of my life have been spent in one Spanish town or another, hopping from bar to bar, dropping a handful of euros on small bites and glasses of wine or sherry in one spot, then moving on to the next. I love Spain and tapas so much that last fall I was invited to judge an international tapas competition in Valladolid, Spain.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2011
Also reviewed by Lari Robling: Cafe Con Chocolate, 2100 S. Norwood St., 267-639-4506. This small cafe on the western edge of South Philadelphia is often called Mexican-Japanese fusion. Best to say the chef/owner's heritage makes it a mixed menu of Mexican and Japanese dishes. This is a welcoming place that offers a good brunch as well as dinner. Menu is heavier on the Mexican side with some stellar egg dishes and a sweet and spicy mole. Service is very personal, but on the slow side, so relax and take your time.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 2011 | By LARI ROBLING, For the Daily News
WHAT'S MISSING from the Philadelphia flavor profile but also has a familiar, burger-and-fries feel? That's the question Adam Solomon pondered when he was looking to develop a restaurant concept. His answer? American food with an ethnic twist in a spot named after an ancient Native American deity. December saw the opening of Kokopelli Restaurant and Tequila Bar on Chestnut Street near Rittenhouse Square. As executive chef, Solomon and his partners, Kenny Yeretzian and Rich Brenner, brought in Gina Rodriguez, who combines her Southwestern heritage with classic French cooking.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|