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NEWS
July 1, 2010 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
New York City went for small high schools in a big way, and the country's largest school system is still high on that education reform strategy. Oakland, Calif., opened 49 small schools in the last decade, but is closing six. And in Philadelphia, the superintendent's message is clear - small schools are fine, but don't expect any new ones until inequities at big neighborhood high schools are fixed. For a time in the mid-2000s, small schools were booming. They were supposed to transform the large, failing American high school, to engage students and boost their achievement to ready them for college.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rider University announced plans last month to close some academic programs and lay off 14 faculty members, it cited financial struggles and a need "to adapt to the changing climate. " Those challenges are familiar to many other small and mid-sized private colleges in the region. Among the chief concerns: a shrinking pool of traditional college-bound students, continually increasing costs, and a constant need to prove value. For private colleges, lack of state funding leads to dependency on tuition dollars; for smaller schools, enrollment can vary wildly and is never guaranteed.
NEWS
February 28, 2008 | By Susan Snyder INQUIRER STAFF WRITER Contact staff writer Susan Snyder at 215-854-4693 or ssnyder@phillynews.com
Kensington High School's enrollment will not reach as high as a student group had feared, the district's interim chief academic officer told students yesterday. The promise came during a meeting, held after students staged two separate rallies to urge the Philadelphia School District to keep three small high schools at Kensington and create two more at Olney. Members of Youth United for Change protested the district's intention to increase the size of three smaller high schools operating at what used to be Kensington High.
SPORTS
April 7, 1986 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
To the casual observer, it may seem uncommon to see a Group 1 school ranked among the area's elite scholastic baseball teams. But, then again, Florence High looks like an uncommon team. Uncommonly talented, that is. For the second straight season, Florence is being mentioned as one of South Jersey's premier teams. A year ago, the Flashes went 24-3, won the Group 1 state title and finished No. 3 in The Inquirer's South Jersey ratings, behind Cherokee and Bishop Eustace. Florence opened its season Thursday with an impressive 11-2 nonleague win over Cherokee, the defending Group 4 state champion.
SPORTS
March 24, 2002 | By Marc Narducci INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
This was a season of parity in South Jersey boys' basketball, in which the small schools - Burlington City in Group 1 and Middle Township in Group 2 - were the lone South Jersey state champions. It was not a good season to be a No. 1 seed in the NJSIAA tournament. Burlington City was the only top-seeded team of the six groups to win a South Jersey championship. The Cape-Atlantic League flexed its postseason muscles with Middle Township winning a state title, St. Augustine capturing a South Jersey championship, and Wildwood Catholic earning a berth in a sectional final before losing to St. Rose in the Parochial B final.
SPORTS
November 6, 1989 | By Don McKee, Inquirer Staff Writer
Summing up the eighth week of the football season, and taking a look ahead. As the South Jersey playoffs approach, and the conference races wind down, there's a tendency to concentrate on the big schools, which dominate the power ratings and the top 10. But you don't have to be a contender for No. 1 or for the Group 4 championship to be having a good season. In fact, at least one school in the area is taking heart from a winless season. So let's take a closer look at four very small schools that have put together very different records, but still are having a good season in some way, shape or form.
SPORTS
December 16, 2002 | By Phil Sheridan, Bob Ford and Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Brian Mitchell knows his history, even while he is making it. Mitchell passed Walter Payton yesterday, moving to No. 2 on the NFL's all-time all-purpose yardage list. Only Jerry Rice, who is still playing, is ahead of Mitchell, who finished the game against the Washington Redskins with 21,912 combined yards. Payton, the late Chicago Bears running back, finished with 21,803 career yards. Rice has a total of 22,089, including yesterday's 30 receiving yards. He is 177 yards ahead of Mitchell.
SPORTS
November 18, 1990 | By Frank Lawlor, Inquirer Staff Writer
Wondrous things happen on the quiet fields of the Wideners and Kutztowns of this world. Meet Cass Corcoran, Kim Baum, Tom Kellett and Lisah Hamilton. They are small-college athletes, and by competitive standards, they played well this fall. But their presence in college sports is an accomplishment that can only be described as big time. Cass Corcoran is the captain of the Philadelphia Textile women's cross- country team. She is 32, but when she's running, she feels 19, the age of most of her teammates.
NEWS
November 6, 1999 | By James M. O'Neill, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Yeah, political junkies still have to wait months before the Republican National Convention hits town. But hey - pols of a younger vintage converge from across the country for their own unique gathering this weekend. Student-government reps from 11 small liberal-arts colleges are spending the weekend at Haverford College to schmooze, share advice, grumble about the rigors of office, and take in some of the same Philadelphia sites likely to impress Republican politicos next summer.
SPORTS
April 29, 2009 | By Bill Iezzi INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Pennsville softball coach Herb Bacon said the answer was on the T-shirts. "We have T-shirts that say: 'Tradition never graduates,' " Bacon said when asked why Pennsville and other small-school softball teams always seem to be among the top 10 ranked by The Inquirer. The tradition about which the veteran coach spoke, of course, is a winning one. Bacon recently celebrated his 550th career victory spanning 28 years at Pennsville. Under his guidance, the Eagles, ranked seventh in South Jersey, have won numerous Tri-County Conference crowns, a half-dozen South Jersey Group 1 championships, and state titles in 2008, 2002 and 1993.
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2016 | By Harold Brubaker, Staff Writer
Philadelphia University president Stephen Spinelli Jr. describes the decision to become part of Thomas Jefferson University as proactive, not defensive. The merger "makes us stronger. Neither of us needed to merge," Spinelli said this month at an East Falls community meeting. But Spinelli did not gloss over the underlying economic forces confounding some colleges and contributing to his board's decision to let the 132-year-old school be taken over by Jefferson. Asked by an East Falls resident about the merger's impact on staff and faculty jobs, Spinelli said: "They are probably more assured of a position with this than they would be without it. " As his comments suggest, the future could be bleak for some small schools, as the number of high school graduates stagnates and resistance to borrowing for ever-higher tuition bills grows.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Jonathan Lai, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Rider University announced plans last month to close some academic programs and lay off 14 faculty members, it cited financial struggles and a need "to adapt to the changing climate. " Those challenges are familiar to many other small and mid-sized private colleges in the region. Among the chief concerns: a shrinking pool of traditional college-bound students, continually increasing costs, and a constant need to prove value. For private colleges, lack of state funding leads to dependency on tuition dollars; for smaller schools, enrollment can vary wildly and is never guaranteed.
NEWS
May 29, 2015
PHILADELPHIANS ARE passionate about fighting for quality public education. We have marched in the streets countless times. We deserve high quality public neighborhood schools and a school district that listens to us as students, parents and community leaders - and we are willing to fight for it. Unfortunately, the school district has shown again that it is unwilling to take our voices into account and is pushing through a school-closure plan in Kensington....
NEWS
May 22, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
A LAWSUIT ACCUSING the state of failing to adequately and equitably fund education is headed to the state Supreme Court. The plaintiffs, which include six school districts and two statewide organizations, filed an appeal yesterday challenging a Commonwealth Court decision last month to dismiss the suit, claiming that school funding is a function of the Legislature, and therefore not a matter for the courts. "Our Supreme Court bears the responsibility for ensuring that our most precious constitutional rights are protected.
NEWS
April 26, 2015 | By Julie Kayzerman, Inquirer Staff Writer
Flying through each leg of their heat, the Rancocas Valley boys' 4x100 meter track quartet crossed the finish line first Friday morning at the Penn Relays. Their time of 42.85 seconds was by far the fastest any South Jersey team ran. But it wasn't quite good enough. The relay, made up of junior JeSean Foster and seniors Dyson Scott, Ellis-Bradley, and Sterling Pierce, was the ninth-fastest of the more than 250 teams that competed Friday at Franklin Field. The top eight qualified for the championship final; Rancocas Valley was .03 seconds behind Bowie, Md. for the final spot.
NEWS
April 23, 2015 | BY SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writer leachs@phillynews.com, 215-854-5903
COMMONWEALTH Court yesterday dismissed a lawsuit accusing the state of failing to adequately and equitably fund Pennsylvania public schools. The complaint was filed by six school districts, seven parents, the Pennsylvania Association of Rural and Small Schools and the NAACP Pennsylvania State Conference, who said they plan to appeal to the state Supreme Court. "This is a question of paramount importance to all Pennsylvanians, and we always knew this would ultimately be decided by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court," Public Interest Law Center of Philadelphia executive director Jennifer Clarke, a member of the legal team representing the plaintiffs, said in a statement.
NEWS
March 13, 2015 | By Kristen A. Graham, Inquirer Staff Writer
HARRISBURG - Pennsylvania's system of education funding is broken, and the courts must force lawmakers to make it right, attorneys for school districts, parents, and organizations that have sued the commonwealth told a panel of judges here Wednesday. The suit - brought by school systems, including the William Penn district in Delaware County, and parents, including two from the Philadelphia School District - argues that Pennsylvania's education funding system is "irrational and inequitable.
NEWS
October 1, 2014 | By Kathy Boccella, Inquirer Staff Writer
With school funding a hot issue in the Pennsylvania gubernatorial race, an alliance of state education leaders is starting a campaign to build support for changing the way the state pays its school bills. During the yearlong campaign, which begins with a televised meeting Tuesday night at 29 intermediate units, 11 "circuit riders" - mostly retired superintendents - will attempt to build support among current superintendents, business managers, and school board members for a movement for education-funding changes, said Jim Buckheit, executive director of the Pennsylvania Association of School Administrators.
SPORTS
April 28, 2014 | By Evan Cross, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jamir Washington was surprised the race was so close. Washington ran the second leg for the Camden boys' 4x400-meter relay team in the South Jersey Small School final Saturday at the Penn Relays. The Panthers ran the relay in 3 minutes, 21.27 seconds, edging Delsea by .72 of a second. Although Washington, a junior, said this was the first time the Panthers raced Delsea, he expected the gap to be bigger. "We usually blow everybody out, but this time Delsea fought," Washington said.
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