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Small Town

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NEWS
October 13, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The American small town at the turn of the 20th century is frequently viewed with nostalgia as a happy, optimistic place, populated by folks content with their constricted lives. On the musical stage, the River City of The Music Man is a prime example of such a community. There is also a contrary view of small-town America. Edwin Arlington Robinson's Spoon River Anthology poems are filled with melancholic people, and in Thornton Wilder's classic play Our Town, the intimacy of Grover's Corners does little to shield its residents from the cruel impositions of an indifferent universe.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By ALICE-LEONE MOATS
The Pulitzers are back from India," my mother announced. "How do you know?" I asked. "I just saw their blinds go up. " Amazingly enough, this small-town conversation took place in New York City. Not so amazingly, really, since the year was 1938, and New York was a very different place from today's Big Apple; it still retained the coziness and many other aspects of a small town. I recall that I was amused, but not at all surprised, when I learned that Henry Luce, who was having an affair with a beautiful blond journalist, used a window blind to signal from his apartment in the Waldorf Towers to hers directly across Park Avenue.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somebody else had to ring the church bell to summon the mourners to the Blooming Rose Church, because this time, Robert Friend couldn't do it. And from now on, somebody else will have to mow the grass at the Gospel Center parsonage. Somebody else will have to serve on the Teen Action board. Somebody else will have to be the president of the Markleysburg Borough. For Robert Friend, the quiet construction superintendent who always seemed to be where his neighbors needed him, is suddenly gone.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whatever you do, please, please, PLEASE don't write about the rabbit, begs Charles "Cuzzy" Rowles. And if you write about it, he adds, "you aren't going to use names, are you?" OK, so we won't use the name of the rabbit. But the story goes like this: In November, a pet rabbit was minding its own business in the back of Ruth Rowles' yard in Eddystone Borough - a nice small yard, with a 3-foot-high cyclone fence. The rabbit was there all alone when - POW! - a neighborhood dog leapt the fence and ripped the rabbit and its metal cage to shreds.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two groups of outsiders regularly invade Williamsport. One is predominantly white, middle class and welcome. The other is mostly black, poor and decidedly unwelcome. The welcome guests are fans of the Little League World Series, which opened here last week. The unwelcome visitors are recovering drug addicts and alcoholics, many of them escaping inner-city Philadelphia for treatment, fellowship and small-town tranquillity in Williamsport. The baseball fans leave after a few days.
NEWS
August 30, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. John McCain's surprise pick for vice president, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, has some wondering if she has the experience to handle the job. Until Palin became governor two years ago, the bulk of her political experience was as mayor of Wasilla, Alaska, a town similar in population to Lansdowne, Delaware County. Lansdowne has about 11,000 residents, according to census data, a few thousand more than Wasilla, population 8,000. While "small-town mayor" may not be a wow factor on a political resume, the mayors of these two communities say Palin gained valuable experience governing in a place where political foes need to get along with their neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Will (Josh Hopkins) is 35, a boyish man with a high-powered ad job and a good Philadelphia address who comes to Lebanon, Pa., for his father's funeral. CJ (Rachel Kitson) is 18, a womanly girl impatient to shake off the dust of Lebanon and move to Philadelphia for college. Their paths cross in Ben Hickernell's sophomore feature, Lebanon, Pa ., a poignant portrait of an unlikely friendship and a pungent contrast of urban clamor and small-town murmur. Where Will has lost his estranged dad, CJ can't get any distance from hers.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | By Sally Friedman
When I first heard the name of the South Jersey town where my newly minted lawyer husband-to-be would begin his practice, it meant absolutely nothing to me. I was, after all, a city girl from Philadelphia who regarded the Ben Franklin Bridge as a thoroughfare across a border I seldom crossed. But after our summer wedding and move to Levittown (now Willingboro), where we settled into a little Cape Cod house, I realized that my frame of reference was forever altered. I was a bona fide resident of New Jersey.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
He is 50, father of a son and two daughters. He has a mild, intelligent face and wears rimless glasses. His hair, not long, runs wild in gray-white tufts. Tom Grady, the mayor of Narberth (population: 4,300), looks more like a professor than a pol. But he fits the mold in what he calls "the heart of the Main Line. " His half-square-mile borough, once a working man's town, has evolved into a bastion of "architects, lawyers, professionals," as he puts it. Mapes 5&10 has been joined by a Japanese market and French bakeries.
SPORTS
February 3, 2011 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
TAMPA - There are two living hockey legends from the unbelievably small Canadian town of Hearst - the furthest drivable town in northern Ontario. And both of them were in the St. Pete Times Forum on Wednesday night. One of them, Claude Larose, put French-speaking Hearst on the hockey map by winning five Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens from 1965-1973. Flyers forward Claude Giroux, who grew up skating in the town's only hockey arena, which bears Larose's name, keeps the flame alive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
June 22, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. Lisa Fazio doesn't remember living anywhere else but Lower Moreland. That doesn't count the years she lived in Philadelphia while attending Drexel University for her architecture and civil engineering degree. "My parents, who grew up in Olney, were living on Brous Avenue in Northeast Philadelphia, and when I came along they decided they needed a larger house for four children," says Fazio, an agent with Weichert Realtors in Jenkintown.
NEWS
June 1, 2015 | By Kevin Riordan, Inquirer Columnist
"Almost an island" is how Joseph Busler describes tucked-away Delanco, the quiet Burlington County township he's called home since 2003. "We've got the Rancocas Creek on one side and the Delaware River on another," says the retired newspaperman, 71. "And along the railroad track is a long narrow strip of water called Nellie's Pond. " Referred to as "haunted" in online guides to New Jersey's spookiest places, the otherwise unremarkable pond has less impact on Delanco's sense of place than the creek and the river.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2015 | By Tirdad Derakhshani, Inquirer Staff Writer
Early in the second half of HBO's J.K. Rowling adaptation, The Casual Vacancy , Michael Gambon's character, Howard Mollison, visits his doctor to get antibiotic ointment for a skin condition. The doctor gingerly lifts a fold in the man's bounteous stomach to reveal a gross red rash. As metaphors go, Gambon's nasty tummy isn't elegant or subtle, but the image perfectly encapsulates the story's satirical thrust. Enjoyable, funny and wickedly profane, the three-hour miniseries is about an idyllic hamlet in the English countryside that, beneath its picturesque green fields, hides a grotesque world of political corruption, adultery, domestic abuse, hatred, jealousy, sloth and other sins too varied to name.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | BY JOHN F. MORRISON, Daily News Staff Writer morrisj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5573
WHEN KATHLEEN Young came to Philadelphia from a small town in North Carolina to attend nursing school, it had to have been something of a culture shock. But rather than being cowed or changed by the clash of environments, Kathleen adjusted, got married, had five children and reveled in the artistic opportunities available in an urban setting. She brought her Southern charm and graciousness with her, and they never deserted her. Kathleen Troncelliti, as she became after marrying world-renowned surgeon Manrico A. Troncelliti, a tireless volunteer in numerous charitable and civic endeavors, devoted wife, mother, grandmother and great-grandmother, died Sept.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 2014 | By Dan DeLuca, Inquirer Music Critic
Miranda Lambert works the same thematic turf about growing up and older in rural America as her (almost entirely male) competitors atop the country charts. She just does it way better than they do. Her show at Camden's Susquehanna Bank Center on Friday wasn't perfect. She faltered during the banal power ballad "Over You," and "Automatic," an admittedly catchy weak link on her formidable album Platinum , goes in for easy nostalgia she is usually too tough to fall for. But other than that, her 90-minute show before an amphitheater full of thoroughly stoked fans was a model of consistency and intelligence.
SPORTS
June 29, 2014 | BY FRANK SERAVALLI, Daily News Staff Writer seravaf@phillynews.com
IT WAS LATE last October when Mike Moore realized he might have a special project lurking on his blue line in lanky defenseman Travis Sanheim. That's when Moore, general manager of the Western Hockey League's Calgary Hitmen, said something clicked in Sanheim. A still unknown commodity, Sanheim had sat as a healthy scratch in four different games that month. "He decided that he was sick of it, he'd had enough time watching," Moore told the Daily News. "He was really hit or miss the first few months of the season.
NEWS
May 12, 2014 | By Thomas Fitzgerald, Inquirer Politics Writer
Last of four candidate profiles MOUNT WOLF, Pa. - You can't begin to know Tom Wolf apart from this speck of a borough named for his great-great-grandfather, who owned the store and post office beside the railroad tracks at the high point of a valley that locomotives labor to crest. The Democratic candidate for governor has roamed the world, but he is rooted at North 40 degrees 3'46" latitude and West 76 degrees, 42'20" longitude. "It was a place I never really had to leave because you could get on your bicycle and just be entertained from morning to night," Wolf said of his boyhood.
NEWS
March 10, 2014 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, Inquirer Staff Writer
PLEASANTVILLE, N.J. - If the fear was that Hurricane Sandy would level off the quirky and distinctive enclaves of the Jersey Shore, look no further than this hidden bay front of Pleasantville, a city across the water from Atlantic City better known for its tolls, crime, and unemployment office. There, and in idiosyncratic Shore communities like it, the long-term toll that Sandy is taking on the landscape is starting to come into focus. Residents who can hang in are trying to rebuild, but the sunken streets around them are starting to look like a future where the old Shore is a memory, like the abandoned collection of jazz and funk records left on three shelves in a condemned house deep in Egg Harbor Township's Morris Beach, another little-known Shore community hit hard by Sandy.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2013 | By Ellen Gray
* UNDER THE DOME. 10 tonight, CBS3.   A SMALL Maine town, cut off from the outside world, sounds like a glorious vacation. Trust Stephen King to see the downside. The master of horror brings his peculiar worldview to CBS today with the launch of a 13-episode series, "Under the Dome. " Based on King's 2009 novel, it chronicles what happens when a transparent, soundproof dome comes slamming down over the town of Chester's Mill, flattening houses, slicing livestock in half - yes, that's the money shot - and trapping neighbors and strangers alike with all kinds of problems they won't be able to run away from.
NEWS
May 19, 2013
The Burn Palace By Stephen Dobyns Blue Rider Press. 480 pp. $26.95 Reviewed by Rhonda Dickey   The Burn Palace is an unsettling mix of sharply observed small-town New England life and a supernatural abduction-and-murder spree. The story begins at Morgan Memorial, a 50-bed hospital in Brewster, R.I. After the frisky Alice Alessio, known more commonly as Nurse Spandex, concludes her tryst with Dr. Balfour, she hurries back to the nursery and, instead of finding the little Summers boy in his crib she finds a harmless but scary corn snake.
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