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NEWS
October 13, 2005 | By Douglas J. Keating INQUIRER THEATER CRITIC
The American small town at the turn of the 20th century is frequently viewed with nostalgia as a happy, optimistic place, populated by folks content with their constricted lives. On the musical stage, the River City of The Music Man is a prime example of such a community. There is also a contrary view of small-town America. Edwin Arlington Robinson's Spoon River Anthology poems are filled with melancholic people, and in Thornton Wilder's classic play Our Town, the intimacy of Grover's Corners does little to shield its residents from the cruel impositions of an indifferent universe.
NEWS
January 31, 1989 | By ALICE-LEONE MOATS
The Pulitzers are back from India," my mother announced. "How do you know?" I asked. "I just saw their blinds go up. " Amazingly enough, this small-town conversation took place in New York City. Not so amazingly, really, since the year was 1938, and New York was a very different place from today's Big Apple; it still retained the coziness and many other aspects of a small town. I recall that I was amused, but not at all surprised, when I learned that Henry Luce, who was having an affair with a beautiful blond journalist, used a window blind to signal from his apartment in the Waldorf Towers to hers directly across Park Avenue.
NEWS
June 11, 1990 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
Somebody else had to ring the church bell to summon the mourners to the Blooming Rose Church, because this time, Robert Friend couldn't do it. And from now on, somebody else will have to mow the grass at the Gospel Center parsonage. Somebody else will have to serve on the Teen Action board. Somebody else will have to be the president of the Markleysburg Borough. For Robert Friend, the quiet construction superintendent who always seemed to be where his neighbors needed him, is suddenly gone.
NEWS
July 23, 1989 | By Cynthia Mayer, Inquirer Staff Writer
Whatever you do, please, please, PLEASE don't write about the rabbit, begs Charles "Cuzzy" Rowles. And if you write about it, he adds, "you aren't going to use names, are you?" OK, so we won't use the name of the rabbit. But the story goes like this: In November, a pet rabbit was minding its own business in the back of Ruth Rowles' yard in Eddystone Borough - a nice small yard, with a 3-foot-high cyclone fence. The rabbit was there all alone when - POW! - a neighborhood dog leapt the fence and ripped the rabbit and its metal cage to shreds.
NEWS
August 27, 1990 | By David Zucchino, Inquirer Staff Writer
Two groups of outsiders regularly invade Williamsport. One is predominantly white, middle class and welcome. The other is mostly black, poor and decidedly unwelcome. The welcome guests are fans of the Little League World Series, which opened here last week. The unwelcome visitors are recovering drug addicts and alcoholics, many of them escaping inner-city Philadelphia for treatment, fellowship and small-town tranquillity in Williamsport. The baseball fans leave after a few days.
NEWS
August 30, 2008 | By Mari A. Schaefer and Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
Sen. John McCain's surprise pick for vice president, Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, has some wondering if she has the experience to handle the job. Until Palin became governor two years ago, the bulk of her political experience was as mayor of Wasilla, Alaska, a town similar in population to Lansdowne, Delaware County. Lansdowne has about 11,000 residents, according to census data, a few thousand more than Wasilla, population 8,000. While "small-town mayor" may not be a wow factor on a political resume, the mayors of these two communities say Palin gained valuable experience governing in a place where political foes need to get along with their neighbors.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2010 | By Carrie Rickey, Inquirer Movie Critic
Will (Josh Hopkins) is 35, a boyish man with a high-powered ad job and a good Philadelphia address who comes to Lebanon, Pa., for his father's funeral. CJ (Rachel Kitson) is 18, a womanly girl impatient to shake off the dust of Lebanon and move to Philadelphia for college. Their paths cross in Ben Hickernell's sophomore feature, Lebanon, Pa ., a poignant portrait of an unlikely friendship and a pungent contrast of urban clamor and small-town murmur. Where Will has lost his estranged dad, CJ can't get any distance from hers.
NEWS
January 9, 2002 | By Sally Friedman
When I first heard the name of the South Jersey town where my newly minted lawyer husband-to-be would begin his practice, it meant absolutely nothing to me. I was, after all, a city girl from Philadelphia who regarded the Ben Franklin Bridge as a thoroughfare across a border I seldom crossed. But after our summer wedding and move to Levittown (now Willingboro), where we settled into a little Cape Cod house, I realized that my frame of reference was forever altered. I was a bona fide resident of New Jersey.
NEWS
July 4, 2011
He is 50, father of a son and two daughters. He has a mild, intelligent face and wears rimless glasses. His hair, not long, runs wild in gray-white tufts. Tom Grady, the mayor of Narberth (population: 4,300), looks more like a professor than a pol. But he fits the mold in what he calls "the heart of the Main Line. " His half-square-mile borough, once a working man's town, has evolved into a bastion of "architects, lawyers, professionals," as he puts it. Mapes 5&10 has been joined by a Japanese market and French bakeries.
SPORTS
February 3, 2011 | By FRANK SERAVALLI, seravaf@phillynews.com
TAMPA - There are two living hockey legends from the unbelievably small Canadian town of Hearst - the furthest drivable town in northern Ontario. And both of them were in the St. Pete Times Forum on Wednesday night. One of them, Claude Larose, put French-speaking Hearst on the hockey map by winning five Stanley Cups with the Montreal Canadiens from 1965-1973. Flyers forward Claude Giroux, who grew up skating in the town's only hockey arena, which bears Larose's name, keeps the flame alive.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
REAL_ESTATE
July 18, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. As small towns go, Rutledge is one of the smallest around here - just 798 people in one square mile of Delaware County. That's the number the borough's website gives as the population of Rutledge. The U.S. Census says that as of 2010, there were 784 people, down from 860 in 2000, but that's not the only fact about Rutledge that seems to be disputed. More on that later. When it comes to real estate, this isn't a very active place - the fact that the public record shows only 277 property owners could be the reason why. Among the many things this town has going for it, says S. Clark Kendus of D. Patrick Welsh Real Estate, is that of the communities that comprise the Wallingford-Swarthmore School District - Swarthmore, Rose Valley, Nether Providence (Wallingford is within that township's borders)
NEWS
June 26, 2016
case/lang/veirs (Anti- ***) Beware the supergroup. When strong-willed solo artists join forces, end results often do not equal, let alone exceed, the sum of their parts. There's no working at cross purposes in evidence, however, on this impressively cohesive three-way team-up of Americana-leaning vocalist and songwriters Neko Case, k.d. lang, and Laura Veirs. The unexpected grouping was instigated by lang, the still sumptuous-voiced chanteuse whose career-highlight collaborations include her early cowgirl years with the band Ben Mink, plus pairings with Roy Orbison and Tony Bennett.
REAL_ESTATE
April 11, 2016 | By Alan J. Heavens, Staff Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. From what Realtors say, Perkasie is a place coveted by those enamored of small-town living. A whole lot of building designed to enhance that small-town experience is going on now in the Bucks County borough 30 miles north of Philadelphia. That includes more than 300 homes, a surprising number in a community of 8,515 people, especially considering there isn't as much residential building going on in the suburbs now as there was before or during the boom years of a decade ago. "Today's buyers want new, and residential construction is a good sign of an active real estate market," says Frank Dolski, an agent with Coldwell Banker Hearthside Real Estate in Lahaska.
REAL_ESTATE
December 7, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. The big news in Pitman in recent weeks centered on beer, unusual for the historically "dry" BYOB Gloucester County borough. "You've heard about the brewery?" asks Patricia Settar of Berkshire Hathaway Home Services Fox & Roach Realtors, in Mullica Hill, who sells a lot of houses here. Settar was referring to Kelly Green Brewing Co., which plans to open its doors to beer drinkers in March.
NEWS
November 16, 2015
D EAR ABBY: My husband is a partner in a small law firm. One of the secretaries has gotten into the habit of texting him somewhat inappropriate pictures. One of them was of a "willy warmer" for a penis. I know she thinks it's funny and harmless, but it bothered me. I think it was unprofessional and went beyond the boundaries of an employee relationship. If I mention it to my husband, he will know I looked at his phone messages, and I don't want him to think I don't trust him. Am I making too much of this?
NEWS
November 3, 2015 | By Susan Snyder, Inquirer Staff Writer
Christian Soltysiak hastily drew a face on the pumpkin with a marker. "He didn't want to carve it," Soltysiak said of her 4-year-old son, William. "He only wanted to drop it. " William fidgeted nearby. "Mommy, move it right now!" About 45 minutes remained before the event would begin. But already, six other pumpkins were lined up, and William was determined to watch his pumpkin take the ride of its life over Jenkintown. It would get loaded into a homemade cage in the middle of the town square, tied to the borough's fire truck ladder, and hoisted 105 feet in the air. That's 10 stories high.
REAL_ESTATE
November 2, 2015 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
One in a continuing series spotlighting real estate markets in the region's communities. It wasn't the best day for a visit to Audubon, N.J. Wind-whipped rain washed over the White Horse Pike. Sidewalks were empty of all but the hardiest souls, who spent much of their journey from car to shop preventing their umbrellas from turning inside out. The threat of more bad weather led to a week's postponement of the borough's annual fall yard sale - one of the big ways the Celebrate Audubon Committee raises funds for its Fourth of July celebration.
SPORTS
October 22, 2015 | BY JEFF NEIBURG, Daily News Staff Writer jneiburg@phillynews.com
THE VILLAGE of Warburg, Alberta, is home to 789 people, according to Canadian census data from 2011. Just under 400 of them are men. What are the odds, then, that two boys from that town grow up and one day coach against each other in the National Hockey League? The math would show that it's, well . . . pretty improbable, all things considered. "It's a coaching hotbed, Warburg," Dallas Stars coach Lindy Ruff said with a laugh after Tuesday's morning skate at Wells Fargo Center.
NEWS
September 22, 2015 | By Chris Brennan, Inquirer Columnist
The first thing you notice about John Fetterman is the sheer size of the 6-foot-8 mayor from Braddock, a tiny borough just east of Pittsburgh. That makes you look. Then you can't help but notice that, among Fetterman's tattoos, are large numbers, 15104 on his left forearm and a series of nine dates on his right. The left arm tells us Braddock's zip code. The right lists the dates when people in the borough of 2,100 people were killed since Fetterman won his first election for mayor in 2005 by a single provisional ballot.
NEWS
September 14, 2015 | By Chris Palmer, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's hard to miss Stephen Stahl when he strolls down New Hope's Main Street. Ocean-blue shirt, blinding-white pants. Flip flops clacking beneath his feet, black shades resting atop his trimmed white hair. And, on Friday, quarters in his pockets. With wings on his back. "I'm going on a flight!" he joked to a friend driving by as they pointed at the feathery appendage strapped around his shoulders. Then he turned and chuckled: "People think I'm coming out of a gay bar or something.
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