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Small World

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NEWS
December 7, 1987 | By Stephan Salisbury, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is 250 miles from Nashville to Memphis. There's not much to look at these days along Tennessee's bland but rolling spine - the usual strip development, small towns, the occasional mansion, scrub pine and oak, old farm and cotton land. But for writer Peter Taylor, who grew up in Tennessee, as his father and mother did, and their fathers and mothers before them, and on and on into the far American past, those two cities and the 250 miles in between represent a universe.
NEWS
November 29, 1992 | By Sid Holmes, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
With a pyramid of cigarette butts in the ashtray attesting to his concentration, Bill Gillespie slowly rolled the boxcar along the two-foot section of rail. Not quite satisfied, he did it again, as a colleague watched with the look of an expectant father. "There are certain regulations that the cars have to pass for coupler heights, weight and wheels," said Ernie Brouse, smiling as Gillespie nodded in approval and exchanged the boxcar for a tanker. "The stuff you buy on the shelf is too light.
NEWS
July 7, 1988 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer
When Beth Krush drinks coffee, she sweetens her cup with half a packet of Sweet 'N Low; the other half is for Joe, her husband of 46 years, who patiently waits his turn. When one talks, the other listens - head slightly cocked, totally engrossed - before swooping down, in midsentence, to carry on the tale of their lives together. In this long, productive marriage, the meeting of like minds has spawned a single vision that extends far beyond the pleasures of home and family life on the Main Line.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My oldest son came to me nine months ago asking my opinion. He wanted to donate sperm to a black lesbian couple (for a fee) so they could have a biracial child. He told me he needed the money. I told him I didn't approve because they were lesbians. (Sorry, I'll be bashed for that statement, but I have to be honest.) I have a biracial 10-year-old son, so race isn't the issue. Had it been a heterosexual couple of any race, I would have been OK. However, what I told him was that if he gave up his rights to the child, I, too, wouldn't have grandparents' rights.
NEWS
May 3, 1990 | Special to The Inquirer / ANDREW EINHORN
It's a small world after all, as Thomas Guenther brings the German craft of miniature Hummel figurines to Bucks County. Guenther - a master painter for Goebel West Germany, the only manufacturer of the porcelain figurines - visited Yeagle's Potpourri in Lahaska on Sunday during his first trip to the United States. Collectors pay hundreds of dollars, sometimes thousands, for the pieces, which are based on the drawings and paintings of Maria Innocentia Hummel, a Bavarian nun who sold her works to the Goebel company more than 50 years ago.
NEWS
December 12, 1986
It's hard to tell yet how this piece of information fits into the U.S.-Israeli-Iranian-contras jigsaw puzzle, but: On Dec. 12, 1982, the Madrid daily El Pais reported the surprise appearance in Tegucigalpa, Honduras, of Ariel Sharon, then the minister of defense for Israel. It closely followed President Reagan's arrival, also in Tegucigalpa, on Dec. 4, 1982. My goodness, it's a small world indeed! Maybe in the not-too-distant future we'll be calling this little prelude to the current arms scandal "Tegucigalpagate.
NEWS
January 5, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The view from behind the sizzling grill at Pat's King of Steaks isn't much to speak of. But it does provide a good sight line of the mural above the empty lot across South Ninth Street - the one with the likenesses of Fabian, Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell, Frankie Avalon, and other native pop stars. Josh Colon has spent nearly a decade working at the South Philadelphia cheesesteak mecca, developing mad spatula skills while asking customers, "You want that wid? Or widout?" Now he's ready to try life on the other side of the Plexiglas, to maybe etch his own face on the musical Wall of Fame.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012
Grace Hall is the big favorite in the Grade II Delaware Oaks at Delaware Park on Saturday. The mile-and-a-sixteenth, $400,000 filly classic has attracted a field of seven. In her most recent race, the locally based daughter of Empire Maker, who broke her maiden at Delaware Park in her career debut July 11, 2011, finished third in the Kentucky Oaks at Churchill Downs on May 4. The winner of the Kentucky Oaks, Believe You Can, and the second-place finisher, Broadway's Alibi, also broke their maidens at Delaware Park in 2011.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2016
DEAR ABBY: My oldest son came to me nine months ago asking my opinion. He wanted to donate sperm to a black lesbian couple (for a fee) so they could have a biracial child. He told me he needed the money. I told him I didn't approve because they were lesbians. (Sorry, I'll be bashed for that statement, but I have to be honest.) I have a biracial 10-year-old son, so race isn't the issue. Had it been a heterosexual couple of any race, I would have been OK. However, what I told him was that if he gave up his rights to the child, I, too, wouldn't have grandparents' rights.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
"T OMORROWLAND" had Memorial Day weekend to itself (except for the nice weather), and still pulled in only a modest $41.7 million in its first four days in theaters, according to Rentrak estimates yesterday. It's a disappointing debut for a film that cost a reported $180 million. Disney put its full weight behind the Brad Bird -directed film with an ambitious George Clooney -led promotional campaign. The problem: The "Tomorrowland" audience has no idea who Clooney is. But Disney's takeaway from the lower-than-expected opening is scarier, claiming that this is the gamble that studios must take when trying to introduce an original film to the marketplace.
NEWS
March 17, 2015 | By Bob Ford, Inquirer Columnist
After Lafayette beat American University last Wednesday to emerge as champion of the Patriot League, coach Fran O'Hanlon got a text message from Villanova coach Jay Wright. College basketball is a small world, and the tentacles of the game that emanate from Philadelphia sometimes seem to encircle it all. O'Hanlon, who played at Villanova and graduated in 1970, is in his 20th season at Lafayette, coaching in the same conference as Bucknell, where Wright went to school. It certainly is a small world and both O'Hanlon and Wright knew last week that it might get a whole lot smaller for the two of them very quickly.
NEWS
April 28, 2013 | By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer TV Writer
If you can't stop the world, can you at least slow it down? Because lately it's wobbling way out of orbit. This week, Gwyneth Paltrow was anointed "The World's Most Beautiful Woman" by the ultimate arbiter of pulchritude, People magazine. What am I missing here? Not just beautiful, the most beautiful. In the world. I haven't been this shocked since Leonard Cohen was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Paltrow's appearance might best be described as "fairly pleasant.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2013
ARIES (March 21-April 19) If you request things repeatedly, you'll sound like a nag, and you'll be tuned out. So instead, you'll take matters into your own hands. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) The task you've been dreading won't be so bad. Today's high energy level will make it much easier. GEMINI (May 21-June 21) You're a social person, but crowds can still cause you stress, especially when you have to keep track of someone or stick with a group. CANCER (June 22-July 22) Does acting "as if" something is true really make it so?
NEWS
October 4, 2012 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
The New Jersey Democrat was playing the role of a Pennsylvania Republican, Rick Santorum, when he went for the jugular in a mock debate with Democrat Bob Casey in 2006. "You know, let me tell you something, Bob," Rep. Rob Andrews (D., N.J.) remembers saying. "The only thing I'm grateful for you after I hear you misrepresent your record is that your father is not here to hear it. " The issue was abortion. Andrews knew that both Casey and then-Sen. Santorum opposed abortion, and that the subject was sure to surface in the coming televised debate.
SPORTS
July 12, 2012
Grace Hall is the big favorite in the Grade II Delaware Oaks at Delaware Park on Saturday. The mile-and-a-sixteenth, $400,000 filly classic has attracted a field of seven. In her most recent race, the locally based daughter of Empire Maker, who broke her maiden at Delaware Park in her career debut July 11, 2011, finished third in the Kentucky Oaks at Churchill Downs on May 4. The winner of the Kentucky Oaks, Believe You Can, and the second-place finisher, Broadway's Alibi, also broke their maidens at Delaware Park in 2011.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | Melissa Dribben is an Inquirer staff writer
A few months ago, my cousin Nanci's friends threw her an early 50th birthday bash.   Just 160 of her closest buds. In the photos, she is beaming. She's lost some weight. Her hair is cropped short. Her makeup is perfect. You hardly notice the wheelchair. The music, the food, the decorations, everything was just the way she had wanted it, because Nanci really knew how to whoop it up. In her 20s, she threw a toga party in her backyard and asked her father, Herb, to judge the costumes.
NEWS
October 7, 2011 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
Artist Daniel Anthonisen lives in a rustic carriage house in Point Pleasant, Bucks County, that basically consists of one room and a loft. For Anthonisen, 41, it's a perfect fit. His tiny carriage house sits next to a historic home that dates to 1794 on the expansive property of architect Alan Ritchie and his wife, Rosa, an interior designer. Ritchie is a partner in the New York architectural firm of Johnson-Ritchie, which has designed buildings including Trump International, the Chrysler Center, and locally, the Business Center at Drexel University.
NEWS
January 5, 2010 | By David Hiltbrand INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The view from behind the sizzling grill at Pat's King of Steaks isn't much to speak of. But it does provide a good sight line of the mural above the empty lot across South Ninth Street - the one with the likenesses of Fabian, Chubby Checker, Bobby Rydell, Frankie Avalon, and other native pop stars. Josh Colon has spent nearly a decade working at the South Philadelphia cheesesteak mecca, developing mad spatula skills while asking customers, "You want that wid? Or widout?" Now he's ready to try life on the other side of the Plexiglas, to maybe etch his own face on the musical Wall of Fame.
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