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Smart Growth

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NEWS
January 17, 2003 | By Paul Chrystie
While many of Gov. McGreevey's proposed steps to curb suburban sprawl are positive, his failure to even mention any strategy for affordable housing is very discouraging. Smart growth, sound planning and affordable housing go hand in hand. Both the American Planning Association and the Smart Growth Network agree that providing quality housing for people of all income levels in all regions is a key part of any smart-growth strategy. Creating large corporate complexes and malls in the suburbs and exurbs, and then relegating the housing for the low-wage earners at those facilities to communities miles away, is nothing more than a recipe for traffic congestion and jobs that employers can't fill.
REAL_ESTATE
July 25, 1999 | By Alan J. Heavens, INQUIRER REAL ESTATE WRITER
Smart growth is a phrase on everyone's lips these days, but as with most politically charged catchphrases, it can have a variety of interpretations. As articulated by Vice President Gore and others, smart growth means matching housing to jobs, easing traffic gridlock, and preserving open space. The meaning for municipal planning and zoning authorities might be no growth at all, because the cost of providing municipal services, including education, to residents usually exceeds the revenue from property taxes, no matter how much homeowners are willing to pay. These municipalities prefer commercial and industrial growth, which provide much and require less.
NEWS
May 14, 2003 | MARK ALAN HUGHES
I'M OFTEN asked why there's so little "smart growth" in the state. You know smart growth (aka new urbanism): that combination of state infrastructure investment, regional land-use regulation, traditional housing design, pedestrian-friendly street design and increased densities packaged as an alternative to sprawl. Smart growth has been so successfully promoted in states like Maryland, California and New Jersey that it's generating something of a backlash. But here, we've seen only small policy changes and few actual projects.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance started in 2003, its founders knew their mission would not be without considerable rigor. The nonprofit group - when created, only the second of its kind in the United States - was promoting a style of development largely absent and misunderstood here: high-density, walkable communities, where sidewalks are plentiful and housing coexists with shops and offices. The concept remains a vast departure from what dominates this region: zoning that demands that different uses stay separate and that houses be on at least a half-acre.
NEWS
November 25, 2003 | By Susan Bass Levin
The following is excerpted from a speech on the state's "smart growth" plan given by Susan Bass Levin, commissioner of the Department of Community Affairs, to the Burlington County Chamber of Commerce on Nov. 13. If we are to make sure we have a strong economy in New Jersey - that we provide jobs, housing and economic growth, and at the same time preserve and protect our natural resources - then "smart growth" is a way of bringing it all together....
NEWS
May 9, 2002 | By James P. Fox
Gov. McGreevey recently presented the legislature with the state's annual spending plan for transportation capital improvements. The plan affects each citizen - whether he lives in a suburb or a city or in the north or the south, and whether he takes mass transit or drives. Every facet of transportation infrastructure, from rail cars and bridges to jug handles and roadwork, is included. This year's plan represents the beginning of an important policy shift for the Department of Transportation.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
For years, state planners have been begging builders to stop digging up open spaces just because it's cheaper and faster, and instead to redevelop in cities and older suburbs. But laws on permits gave builders no incentive to change their habits. So the Legislature had the right intent when it aimed to streamline bureaucracy and paperwork for "designated growth areas" in about a third of the state. But the result - a loosely worded political payoff, negotiated behind closed doors, and rushed through in three days last month - won't do the job. The new law expedites building permits in areas earmarked for development far from sensitive places such as the Highlands and Pinelands.
NEWS
January 26, 2001
Now that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has corrected statistics on the pace of sprawl and other land uses, Pennsylvania drops from second to fifth place in the nation. Rather than 1.1 million acres developed between 1992 and 1997, Pennsylvania saw growth rates that gobbled up only about 545,000, the USDA reports. Who wouldn't rejoice at reclaiming a half-million acres? New Jersey, too, saw its 20th place development losses shaved by about 25 percent when the USDA reworked its numbers to overcome a computer glitch.
NEWS
March 3, 2003 | By Richard M. Hluchan
As an attorney specializing in land-use and environmental law, and as someone who has lived in Haddonfield for 28 years, I think the state's smart-growth strategy is inadequate. New Jersey is projected to grow by one million people, and 800,000 jobs, by 2020. A true smart-growth plan would identify where these people will live, and ensure that housing is built for them. New housing must be affordable and available. Currently, about one million state residents live in substandard housing or pay up to half their income to keep a roof over their heads.
NEWS
November 25, 2003
If you're going to declare war, you'd better have an army and a battle plan. Gov. McGreevey had neither when he took on his state's most intractable problem. "There is no single greater threat to our way of life in New Jersey than the unrestrained, uncontrolled development that has jeopardized our water supplies, made our schools more crowded, our roads congested and our open space disappear," McGreevey said in his State of the State address last January. He promised to help towns control growth and property taxes.
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SPORTS
February 26, 2016 | By David Murphy, Daily News Columnist
CLEARWATER, Fla. - Six months is an awfully small sample size to judge a general manager, and Matt Klentak is a guy who will readily admit it. At 35, he might be the youngest GM in team history, but he has been around major league baseball enough to know that nobody knows anything until it actually happens. This is something he has a habit of reiterating whenever he senses that somebody is searching for a concrete timetable for the Phillies' future. Scout well, coach well, evaluate well and make sound decisions - the rest depends on the players.
NEWS
March 1, 2015 | By Angelo Fichera, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1982, when Gloucester County planners drafted a framework for growth, one-fifth of the county's land was considered developed - a statistic perhaps best reflected in a slogan that would become the county's mantra: "Close to everything, far from it all. " Three decades later, almost a third of the county is developed. The 330-square-mile county's population has increased by more than 90,000, to about 290,000. Its portion of Route 55 went from plan to pavement. Washington Township's population almost doubled.
BUSINESS
May 18, 2012 | Andy Maykuth, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Institute for Electric Efficiency, a utility industry trade group, said Thursday that 36 million smart meters are now installed, up from 27 million in September, and that 65 million households will have the devices by 2015, about half the American households. In a report , the institute estimates that 22 electric utilities in 16 states will have smart meters fully deployed by the end of this year, including PPL Electric Utilities, Allentown, which rolled them out in 2004.
BUSINESS
December 20, 2010 | By Diane Mastrull, Inquirer Staff Writer
When the Delaware Valley Smart Growth Alliance started in 2003, its founders knew their mission would not be without considerable rigor. The nonprofit group - when created, only the second of its kind in the United States - was promoting a style of development largely absent and misunderstood here: high-density, walkable communities, where sidewalks are plentiful and housing coexists with shops and offices. The concept remains a vast departure from what dominates this region: zoning that demands that different uses stay separate and that houses be on at least a half-acre.
NEWS
October 2, 2009 | By Joelle Farrell INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Regional planning officials are expanding a program that aims to attract new residents to older Philadelphia suburbs and lesser-known communities within the city and on its outskirts. Yesterday, the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission (DVRPC) added nine communities to its list of "Classic Towns of Greater Philadelphia," a marketing effort aimed at online real estate shoppers. New this year are Ardmore, New Hope, Phoenixville, Souderton/Telford and Wayne in the Pennsylvania suburbs; the Germantown neighborhood of Philadelphia; and Glassboro, Merchantville, and Moorestown in New Jersey.
NEWS
March 23, 2009 | By Maya Rao INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In Woolwich, one of the fastest-growing towns in the Northeast, new subdivisions have increasingly gobbled up the rural landscape. To cut down on the sprawl, local leaders recently approved a plan to cluster future development in two high-density areas. Developers seeking to build in those areas must pay to preserve surrounding farmland. Officials were able to make that move - passing the cost of open-space preservation from taxpayers to developers - under a state measure hailed as innovative when it was first enacted.
NEWS
February 2, 2009
New Jersey is making the right move with a plan that will promote smart growth and help protect the Pinelands. Under an amendment approved by the Pinelands Commission, new housing in the region's 250,000-acre Forest Area - a quarter of the Pinelands' territory - will be clustered in developments of one-acre plots. Until now, the average permitted density has been one home per 28 acres. The result has been estate lots that were often turned into gentlemen's farms that fragment the forest, considered the Pinelands second-most environmentally sensitive area, next to its protected core.
NEWS
January 9, 2009 | By Paul Nussbaum INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
If PATCO extends commuter rail service deeper into South Jersey, the best route would be from Camden to Glassboro along an existing freight rail corridor, a state planning agency says. The Office of Smart Growth, in a nonbinding draft recommendation, suggested that route as the one that would do the most to reduce congestion, serve existing communities, and limit suburban sprawl. The route would serve Glassboro, Pitman, Mantua, Wenonah, Woodbury, Deptford, West Deptford, Westville, Bellmawr, Brooklawn and Gloucester City.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2008 | By Diane Mastrull INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
When Marc D. Brookman graduated from law school in 1968, "sprawl" was what one did on the couch while watching The Mod Squad. By the time the word took on its other connotation of land-gobbling, auto-dependent suburban development, Brookman was deep into a law career specializing in real estate development. Today, as a partner at the Center City firm of Duane Morris L.L.P., he is busy advocating an alternative to sprawl known as "smart growth" - pedestrian-scale development, usually in the older suburbs in need of revitalization.
NEWS
May 3, 2007
The Democratic Party is resurgent in Bucks County, giving hope to the faithful that it could win control of the three-member county commission for the first time since the mid-1980s. Voters in the May 15 Democratic primary will choose two nominees among four well-qualified candidates. The Inquirer endorses the team of Diane Marseglia, a Middletown Township supervisor, and Steve Santarsiero, a Lower Makefield Township supervisor. Marseglia, 46, is a school social worker employed by the Bucks County Intermediate Unit and a part-time instructor in criminal justice at the College of New Jersey.
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