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Smart Guns

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NEWS
April 30, 1999 | By Clea Benson, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
In the aftermath of the Columbine High School shootings in Colorado and the fatal shooting of one Philadelphia 7-year-old by another, City Councilman Angel Ortiz yesterday introduced a bill to promote the use of safety technology on guns. The bill, proposed by Mayor Rendell and cosponsored by Councilman David Cohen, would hold gun owners, sellers and carriers liable for civil damages arising from gunshot injuries or death unless the weapons are "smart" guns that can be fired only by their owners.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | By Suzette Parmley, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
The New Jersey Senate yesterday became the first legislative body in the nation to pass a bill that asks the gun industry to develop "smart" technology to protect children. And if it becomes law, the legislation will give the state's top cop the authority to determine when and if such technology is ready to be marketed. The measure, approved 23-17, goes beyond a trigger-lock requirement that the Assembly passed last week but does not mandate smart guns. All 16 Democrats voted against the bill.
NEWS
April 23, 1999 | by Dave Davies, Daily News Staff Writer
It didn't take the Colorado massacre to get Mayor Rendell impassioned about guns. At a news conference yesterday, he held aloft the .44 caliber weapon that earlier this week killed 7-year-old South Philadelphian Nafis Jefferson, whose playmates found the gun under a car. "This is the gun," Rendell said, "a killing machine that should be regulated so that only the person who buys it can use it. " And so Rendell has proposed unprecedented legislation...
NEWS
May 17, 2000 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
One year after starting a review of "smart" guns - weapons that are electronically modified so they can be used only by their rightful owners - a university research team said yesterday that such products are at least five years from being sold in stores. Several manufacturers are working on prototypes of smart guns, yet they will likely require three to five more years of research plus two years of development and testing, said Donald Sebastian, director of the $1 million study by the New Jersey Institute of Technology.
NEWS
July 22, 1999 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
When it comes to "smart" guns - electronically modified weapons that can be fired only by their owners - everyone in the New Jersey legislature seems to have a different approach. Assembly Speaker Jack Collins (R., Salem) put money in the state budget to study such guns, which now exist only in prototype form. Senate President Donald T. DiFrancesco (R., Union) wants to require that all guns be sold with such technology but only after it is "commercially available. " Some gun-control advocates say both are missing the target, and yesterday three Assembly Democrats gave an early indication that their party will flog the issue for all it's worth in November.
NEWS
June 22, 1999 | By Thomas Ginsberg, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Aiming for a compromise with fellow Republicans over handguns, Senate President Donald T. DiFrancesco suggested yesterday giving the state attorney general power to decide when "smart" guns should be made mandatory in New Jersey. But even as DiFrancesco (R., Union) proposed the bill and dropped his support for an earlier, stricter version, it remained unclear whether Assembly Speaker Jack Collins (R., Salem) would agree to the compromise and post DiFrancesco's new bill for an Assembly vote this month, as hoped.
NEWS
June 26, 1999 | By Thomas Martello, ASSOCIATED PRESS Inquirer staff writer Tom Avril contributed to this article
While New Jersey legislators are still debating high-profile and controversial proposals on requiring "smart guns" that can be fired only by their owners, the state Assembly has passed a bill that would require gun dealers to include trigger locks or lock boxes with every handgun they sell. The trigger lock bill, which passed Thursday by 75-5 and drew no debate in the lower house, would also direct that $90,000 be spent to set up a program to make free trigger locks available to current handgun owners.
NEWS
July 29, 1998 | By Craig R. McCoy, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mayor Rendell took his campaign against gun violence to the White House yesterday, lobbying for support for a federal crackdown on firearms crime in Philadelphia. Meeting with Rahm Emanuel, a top adviser to President Clinton, the mayor also urged the White House to get behind a proposal to spend $100 million to develop so-called smart guns that can only be fired by a specific user. Kevin A. Feeley, spokesman for Rendell, said that White House aides were intrigued by both proposals, but stopped short of endorsing them.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Senate President Donald T. DiFrancesco (R., Union) renewed his vow yesterday to bring "smart" handguns to New Jersey - a goal he sought last fall in the legislature but did not accomplish. This time, he has strengthened his gun-safety proposal and boasts a wide array of supporters, including police chiefs, prosecutors, teachers and parents' groups, all of whom joined him at a Statehouse news conference. DiFrancesco also received tentative support yesterday from a person in a strong position to help the proposal become law: Gov. Whitman.
NEWS
May 19, 2000 | By Tom Avril, INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Yesterday, for the second time in less than a year, the New Jersey Senate passed a bill designed to encourage the development of personalized, or "smart," handguns - weapons that theoretically would be unusable by children or other unauthorized people. Unlike the first time, however, the measure passed by a wide margin - 34-2. It had bipartisan support and the backing of gun-control groups, which had argued that the first bill would have allowed the gun industry too much wiggle room.
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NEWS
December 21, 2012
IT SHOULD TAKE Vice President Joe Biden about three minutes to round up a list of ideas to present the president for proposals to reduce gun violence. Many ideas - like banning assault weapons and restricting high-capacity gun magazines - have been around for years. Biden would also do well to consult the list of federal legislation being pushed by Mayors Against Illegal Guns. These include a fix to the gun-checks act that would update the database of people barred from owning handguns, and close the loophole that allows people to buy guns at gun shows without background checks.
NEWS
June 3, 2006
Geno's English For a city and region that has been touting itself both domestically and internationally as a welcoming place to visit and live, the exclusionary and discriminatory practices of this self-appointed immigration czar are disturbing and hateful. After reading the article ("The immigration debate: Then vs. now," May 30), I have so many unanswered questions. I would like to know how Joseph Vento distinguishes between immigrants, both legal or illegal, and tourists.
NEWS
May 25, 2006 | By Tom Avril INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
As police in Philadelphia struggle to stop a scourge of shootings, some New Jersey engineers say they are closing in on a "smart" solution: a gun that can be fired only by its owner. The prototype, developed at the New Jersey Institute of Technology in Newark, has pressure sensors embedded in the gun handle that recognize a person's unique grip. The team says a commercial model is up to five years away, but if it works, it will trigger a singular - and controversial - state law. Within three years, all handguns sold in New Jersey would have to be personalized, with this or some other recognition technology.
NEWS
December 24, 2002 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
New Jersey yesterday became the first state to enact a law requiring that new handguns be sold with technology that allows only designated users to fire the weapons. "It is clearly time we have safety regulations on handguns," Gov. McGreevey said at a ceremony where he signed the "smart gun" bill. But the law won't be enforced for years. Technology required to personalize guns is still in development and would not be mandated until three years after the state attorney general determines it is commercially ready.
NEWS
December 3, 2002
I am appalled that the New Jersey Assembly wasted its time and the money of the taxpayers on a "smart gun" bill that is not even possible to enforce because the technology has not been developed. That would be like paying for a million light bulbs before Thomas Edison invented them. I consider this another example of the mass hysteria that is created by the "fourth arm of government" - the press. Although our government was set up with three methods of checks and balances, it seems the press has been forced down our throats as the fourth, and this is a typical case.
NEWS
November 18, 2002
It's about letting kids be kids. That's all New Jersey Assembly members need keep in mind this week - if, as expected, they vote on legislation endorsing the next generation in handgun safety. The proposal would require so-called smart-gun technology, allowing only a gun's authorized users to fire a weapon. It would be mandated for handguns sold in the state once the technology becomes commercially available. A similar measure passed the Senate in Trenton last month, and Gov. McGreevey has said he supports the concept.
NEWS
October 24, 2002 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A bill that would make New Jersey the first state to mandate a handgun safety technology that doesn't yet exist was brought back from the dead yesterday. The "smart gun" bill, passed by the state Senate, was killed by an Assembly committee Monday when Chairman Peter J. Barnes Jr. (D., Middlesex) objected to an exemption for law enforcement officers. Behind-the-scenes discussions involving the bill's sponsor, Assemblywoman Loretta Weinberg (D., Bergen), and Gov. McGreevey led Barnes to agree to bring back the bill and support it - giving it enough votes to move to the full Assembly.
NEWS
October 22, 2002 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
A bill that eventually would have required the sale of personalized handguns that could be fired only by specific people was killed yesterday by an Assembly committee. It was the furthest the effort to mandate so-called "smart guns" had gotten in New Jersey, which supporters have been trying to make the first state with such a law. The Senate has twice passed the measure only to see it fail in the Assembly. Anticipating a defeat, gun-control advocates earlier in the day said they would go after opposition legislators.
NEWS
October 21, 2002 | By Mitch Lipka INQUIRER TRENTON BUREAU
Picture a handgun that knows the feel of its owner so intimately it won't let anyone else pull the trigger. New Jersey is homing in on legislating this image of a personalized handgun - a concept likely years away from going from lab research to the handgun stashed in someone's nightstand. The state would be the first to require this "smart gun" technology on gun purchases after it becomes commercially available. An Assembly committee is scheduled to take up the bill today in a hearing that could determine whether the state will pioneer a new period in gun-control laws.
NEWS
June 3, 2001
Biometrics may sound like a religious cult, but it's a touch-sensing technology that New Jersey researchers say may soon lead to the first truly child-proof handgun. No wonder the breakthrough announcement by the New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) was applauded by handgun safety advocates, Acting Gov. Donald DiFrancesco, and state Senate leaders. They've been waiting impatiently as Assembly Speaker Jack Collins (R., Salem) holds off a vote on key gun-safety legislation.
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