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BUSINESS
August 7, 2009 | By Andrew Maykuth INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peco Energy Co. yesterday offered its vision of the electrical grid of the future: In a few years, "smart" electric meters will be able to do much more than measure the power consumed in customers' homes. They will tell customers how much money they are spending on electricity in real time, and offer options for cutting costs. "Your air conditioner will be able to talk to your dishwasher and sequence their usage to save money," Glenn Pritchard, a Peco engineer, said as he surveyed a table of meters and thermostats at the utility's Center City headquarters.
NEWS
September 29, 2008
With Pennsylvania electricity consumers facing record rate increases in the next few years, what's the state Senate doing guarding the bottom line of Peco Energy Co. and other utilities? Having delayed action for months on a House-approved energy-savings measure, the Senate last week suddenly gutted key consumer protections in the bill. Utilities will be the winners; consumers and the state's business climate the losers. The Senate approach would leave consumers even more vulnerable to looming double-digit rate increases.
NEWS
September 18, 2007 | By Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Seeking to counter Gov. Rendell's $850 million energy plan with a less-costly version of their own, House Republicans unveiled a proposal yesterday heavy on conservation tax incentives and grants. Members of the House Republican Energy Task Force touted their "no-tax, no-borrow" plan as a way to give consumers more choice in how they conserve energy while not penalizing homeowners with additional electricity fees. They unveiled the plan on the first day of a special legislative session on energy.
NEWS
September 16, 2007 | By Angela Couloumbis INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
Solar energy. Ethanol plants. Biodiesel fuel. Smart meters. For Gov. Rendell, these things have become a passion, if not a part of his potential legacy. But as the legislature prepares to convene a special fall session tomorrow on Rendell's sweeping plan for alternative-energy projects across Pennsylvania, serious questions remain about how much the governor can get past lawmakers who already have fought him on it once - to the brink of a government shutdown. Many issues still divide the two sides, with the central disagreement remaining: how much to spend and where to get the money.
BUSINESS
July 11, 2007 | By Jeff Gelles INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
A ray of sunlight for solar energy in Pennsylvania, a hopeful forecast for investment in other alternative sources of power, and continuing clouds over conservation. That, in a nutshell, was the outcome of last-minute negotiations between Gov. Rendell and Republican leaders over a package of proposals Rendell had touted as his "Energy Independence Strategy. " Rendell had pushed past the traditional budget deadline and helped force a daylong furlough of state workers, partly on behalf of the energy package.
NEWS
November 18, 2002 | By Robert Moran INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Melanie Sellers fed quarters - one after another after another - into the new "smart" parking meter on Chestnut Street overlooking the Schuylkill. After the 11th quarter, the digital display read "3:23" for three hours and 23 minutes, which included a bit of time left from an earlier feeding. After the 12th quarter, "3:38. " After the 13th quarter, "3:38. " Sellers gave the rock-solid meter a few swift smacks of her palm. Nothing. Less than an hour later, the time was erased and the meter was flashing "Out of Order.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | By Jack Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Three years ago, when borough officials brought computerized parking meters to town, they were counting on the "smart meters" to bring in more revenue and generate traffic-pattern reports by keeping track of cars as they parked and pulled away from Main Street curbs. Now, saying the meters have not worked as advertised, borough officials have exiled them to the far reaches of North Main Street, where tourists and shoppers park only after the rest of the street is filled up. Residents and parking officials had complained that the 55 high-tech meters broke down frequently and often reset themselves at random intervals.
NEWS
November 6, 1998 | by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer by Theresa Conroy, Daily News Staff Writer
It was just a handful of dimes and nickels . . . that added up to 50 grand. It took Robert C. Morris Jr. about eight years to collect the $50,000 nest egg that Bucks County authorities say he stole - pocketful by pocketful - from Doylestown parking meters. Morris, the guy in Doylestown Borough who collected the change from the town's 600 meters, has been charged with theft, misappropriation of government property and related offenses. He admitted to lifting nearly $50,000 worth of coins, said Bucks County District Attorney Alan Rubenstein.
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