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Smell

NEWS
June 8, 2011 | By CHRIS BRENNAN, brennac@phillynews.com 215-854-5973
The man expected to serve as the next sheriff of Philadelphia will probably have to pass a legal smell test before taking office. A former legislative aide to state Rep. Jewell Williams sued the state in federal court last week, claiming that Williams insulted her religion, repeatedly tried to kiss her and then once sent her home from his district office when he didn't like the way she smelled. Williams, in his sixth term representing the 197th District in North Philly, won the May 17 Democratic primary election for sheriff and is expected to win that post in the Nov. 8 general election.
NEWS
June 2, 2011 | By Peter Mucha, Inquirer Staff Writer
A sulfur-like smell drove students from Paulsboro High School this morning. Students were moved outside, not sent home, for less than an hour, while the school was ventilated. "They were evacuated because the smell on the outside was less than the smell in the building," explained district superintendent Frank Scambia. They returned by about 9:30 to finish a full day of classes, he said. Investigators were continuing to try to determine the source of the smell. A police lieutenant, who compared the odor to rotten eggs, said the problem was sulfur dioxide released from a nearby oil refinery.
NEWS
May 23, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
The human nose doesn't always know. According to the latest research, we do not all smell the same thing when we walk through a flower-studded meadow in April or a fetid alley in August. As neuroscientist Charles Wysocki sees it, we all live in different sensory worlds. Some people can't smell cilantro. Some can't smell truffles. And thanks to research at the Monell Chemical Senses Center in West Philadelphia, it's been scientifically documented that some can't detect the funky odor of post-asparagus-eating urine.
NEWS
May 20, 2011 | By Faye Flam, Inquirer Staff Writer
It may not have been survival of the smartest but of the keenest sniffers that pushed the brains of early mammals to grow far bigger and more complex than those of their reptilian ancestors. A group of paleontologists announced Friday that they had used CT scanning to analyze the skulls of ancient creatures on the evolutionary path to becoming mammals, and found most of the brain growth occurred in the smell center - the olfactory bulb. "We associate the brain's primary function with thinking," said Zhe-Xi Luo, a paleontologist at the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, who was part of the team.
NEWS
May 10, 2011 | By RUSSELL CONTRERAS, Associated Press
BOSTON - The nation's first full-face transplant recipient said that the first thing his young daughter told him when she saw him after the operation was, "Daddy, you're so handsome. " Dallas Wiens, 25, sporting a goatee and dark sunglasses, joined surgeons yesterday at Brigham and Women's Hospital here, in his first public appearance since the 15-hour procedure in March. "It feels natural," said Wiens, of Fort Worth, Texas, who received a new nose, lips, skin, muscle and nerves from an anonymous donor.
NEWS
May 5, 2011 | Inquirer Staff Report
This takes money laundering to a different level. Customs and Border Protection agents at Philadelphia International Airport seized more than $11,000 from a Jamaica-bound passenger on Saturday after he tried to hide the cash, stashing some of it in six boxes of Irish Spring Soap in his luggage, officials said today. There is no limit to how much cash can be brought in, or taken out, of the country, but travelers are required to declare amounts in excess of $10,000. The passenger was released and allowed to depart Saturday after agents returned $200 to him and seized the remaining $11,143 he was carrying.
NEWS
April 29, 2011 | By Virginia A. Smith, Inquirer Staff Writer
Peggy Garrett and Lavera Diggins are typical gardeners, which is to say they're totally goofy in springtime. This morning, they're huddled over daffodils. "Oh, my God, Lavera, look at this one!" Garrett exclaims, running her hands through the sun-yellow blooms. Visitors to the Hands-on Garden, behind the Horticulture Center in West Fairmount Park, are often amazed that visually impaired people such as Garrett and Diggins are able to enjoy this place, let alone plant and maintain it. "They come by all the time and say, 'Wow!
NEWS
April 21, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents of Camden's Waterfront South neighborhood should not have to worry anymore about what direction the wind blows during their summer cookouts, city officials say. A $30 million sludge-drying facility and $10 million odor-control system are ready to take on the foul-smelling muck at the Camden County Municipal Utilities Authority plant on Ferry Avenue, authorities announced Wednesday at the start of the city's second annual Camden Clean...
NEWS
March 27, 2011
So much for the "temporary" portion of Philadelphia's increase in property taxes. And so much for a "revenue-neutral" fix to the city's broken property-tax system. Instead, Mayor Nutter's 2012-16 budget plan includes a 20 percent hike in property-tax revenue. The hefty increase comes even as the administration says the city's budget crisis is easing, and that the expected funding cuts in Gov. Corbett's proposed budget aren't nearly as bad as expected. More disturbing, the Nutter administration - which promised an open and transparent City Hall - dropped the property-tax increase into its five-year plan without any comment or explanation.
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