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NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Although she's philosophical about the matter, Kory Stamper says it's technically wrong to call her the F-bomb lady. The title fails to appreciate the collaborative nature of her work. No fewer than a dozen lexicographers vet the origins, significance, and currency of a word before its inclusion in the latest Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. But Stamper was the associate editor picked to tell the world how the colloquialism F-bomb made the cut. The Collingswood word maven found herself quoted from here to the Philippines about the flipping phrase.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are becoming a staple of weekends between June and September, taking their place alongside bathing suits, vacations, and flip-flops. Trunk parties are hot. The soirees named for a piece of luggage once synonymous with packing for college symbolize the rite of passage from high school to college. For party planner Shauntae Doughty, who has organized 10 of the summertime affairs, "it's all the rage. " Perhaps nowhere is that more evident than on the Internet, where college-bound students invite friends to them, post pictures of them, and register at stores for them.
SPORTS
April 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last July, when Penn State finally replaced an interim athletic director who had endured 987 days in the turbulent wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, it hired a woman. A year earlier, when a videotaped tirade by the men's basketball coach surfaced and cost Rutgers' athletic director his job, the New Jersey school did the same. So did Arizona State in 2005 after a football player was charged with murder. When other Division I schools, such as Penn and Eastern Michigan, have experienced sharp downturns in athletic fortunes, they too have turned to women to reinvigorate their slumping programs.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marshall D. Schechter, 78, a psychiatrist who had recommended that custody of a black child remain with a white Downingtown foster couple, although a judge ruled otherwise, died last Tuesday at his home in Wynnewood. Dr. Schechter was professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and maintained a private practice from his home. He specialized in child and adolescent psychiatry. In September 1995, Senior Judge Alexander Endy of Chester County Court ruled that Alexa Howard, 4, should be removed from her white foster parents, B. William and Debra Fell, and placed with Darlene Herring, a black social worker in Washington, D.C. The Fells had raised the child for three years until July 1994, when the Chester County Department of Children, Youth and Families removed her from their custody.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
LAST WEEK, former UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert J. Birgeneau joined a growing group of prominent public figures who have declined invitations to speak at college commencement ceremonies because of protests. Birgeneau - and the students who might have been edified by his remarks - are victims of a shortsighted censoriousness that is becoming a familiar feature of graduation season. Birgeneau withdrew as a commencement speaker at Haverford College after some students there sent him a letter threatening to oppose his appearance unless he apologized (again)
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alice Whitten Lindborg, 87, formerly of Newtown Square, an artist, author and Swedish American historian, died Thursday at the Cathcart Health Center in Devon, where she had resided for three years. Mrs. Lindborg and her husband, artist and sculptor Carl E. Lindborg, who died in 1994, were dedicated to creating works of art and researching and writing on Newtown Township historical issues and Swedish American history. In 1993, they were presented with Charlotta Medals from the Emigrant Institute of Vaxjo, Sweden, for their "dedicated and longstanding services to the Swedish Emigrant Institute and cultural relations between Sweden and the inhabitants of Swedish background in the U.S. " After the ceremony, which was held in Devon, Mrs. Lindborg said, "It was pure happiness and gratitude.
NEWS
March 18, 1991 | By Terence Samuel, Inquirer Staff Writer
Ann Davis Bradley, 59, who taught music for 17 years at the Baldwin School in Bryn Mawr, died Saturday at her home in Strafford, Chester County, after a long illness. Mrs. Bradley taught violin and guitar, and shared with her students her passion for music. During her time at Baldwin, Mrs. Bradley, also a poet, wrote, composed and staged many musical productions. Her musical abilities also led her to a major role in the productions of her church, the United Church of Christ at Valley Forge, of which she was a member for 25 years.
NEWS
February 26, 1986 | From Inquirer Wire Services
Students at Smith College seized control of the campus administration building yesterday to protest the school's refusal to divest its holdings in companies doing business with South Africa. About 100 singing and chanting people, many of whom slept overnight in College Hall, huddled shoulder to shoulder in the building's doorways as employees arrived for work in the morning. The protesters turned away the workers, who were later told by President Mary Maples Dunn to go home, officials said.
SPORTS
October 17, 1997 | By Beth Onufrak, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Sarah Lee has been a big contributor this season for the Haverford College field hockey team. A freshman from Lower Moreland, she helped the Fords snap an 18-game losing streak when they beat Sweet Briar College at the Seven Sisters Tournament hosted by Smith College on Sept. 27-28. A forward, Lee has one goal and two assists for the Fords (2-10). "We rely on Sarah's speed - she's the fastest player on our team," said Haverford coach Anne Livezey, an Ursinus graduate who lives in Collegeville.
NEWS
January 1, 1993 | By Kimberly J. McLarin, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Dorothy D. Chacko, 88, a physician, humanitarian and co-founder of the Chester Art Guild, died at her home in Chester Wednesday. The daughter of Congregational missionary parents, Dr. Chacko was born in Japan and spent her first 16 years there, returning to New England in time to complete her secondary education and to follow generations of her family to Smith College. Dr. Chacko graduated from Smith at the top of her class. In 1929, she graduated from Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons and in 1932 graduated from the London School of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.
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SPORTS
April 22, 2015 | By Frank Fitzpatrick, Inquirer Staff Writer
Last July, when Penn State finally replaced an interim athletic director who had endured 987 days in the turbulent wake of the Jerry Sandusky scandal, it hired a woman. A year earlier, when a videotaped tirade by the men's basketball coach surfaced and cost Rutgers' athletic director his job, the New Jersey school did the same. So did Arizona State in 2005 after a football player was charged with murder. When other Division I schools, such as Penn and Eastern Michigan, have experienced sharp downturns in athletic fortunes, they too have turned to women to reinvigorate their slumping programs.
NEWS
May 22, 2014
LAST WEEK, former UC Berkeley Chancellor Robert J. Birgeneau joined a growing group of prominent public figures who have declined invitations to speak at college commencement ceremonies because of protests. Birgeneau - and the students who might have been edified by his remarks - are victims of a shortsighted censoriousness that is becoming a familiar feature of graduation season. Birgeneau withdrew as a commencement speaker at Haverford College after some students there sent him a letter threatening to oppose his appearance unless he apologized (again)
NEWS
March 8, 2013 | By Vernon Clark, Inquirer Staff Writer
Karen Tidmarsh, 63, of Haverford, a Bryn Mawr College graduate and professor of English who later served as dean of the women's college for 20 years, died Saturday, March 2, of end-stage carcinoid syndrome at home. Dr. Tidmarsh devoted more than half of her life to Bryn Mawr, where she arrived in the 1960s to study English. She earned a bachelor of arts degree in English there in 1971. As dean, Dr. Tidmarsh was responsible for overseeing undergraduate academic programs and student life.
NEWS
August 25, 2012 | By Kristin E. Holmes, Inquirer Staff Writer
They are becoming a staple of weekends between June and September, taking their place alongside bathing suits, vacations, and flip-flops. Trunk parties are hot. The soirees named for a piece of luggage once synonymous with packing for college symbolize the rite of passage from high school to college. For party planner Shauntae Doughty, who has organized 10 of the summertime affairs, "it's all the rage. " Perhaps nowhere is that more evident than on the Internet, where college-bound students invite friends to them, post pictures of them, and register at stores for them.
NEWS
August 24, 2012 | By Daniel Rubin, Inquirer Columnist
Although she's philosophical about the matter, Kory Stamper says it's technically wrong to call her the F-bomb lady. The title fails to appreciate the collaborative nature of her work. No fewer than a dozen lexicographers vet the origins, significance, and currency of a word before its inclusion in the latest Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary. But Stamper was the associate editor picked to tell the world how the colloquialism F-bomb made the cut. The Collingswood word maven found herself quoted from here to the Philippines about the flipping phrase.
NEWS
May 30, 2011 | By Walter F. Naedele, Inquirer Staff Writer
In 1942, Rita Gilbert was among the first to volunteer for the Waves, the women's branch of the Navy. A college graduate, she took her military training at Smith College and was assigned to a military publications office in Washington. And there, her daughter Laurie said, she helped write and edit the Waves' recruitment brochure, "The Story of You in Navy Blue. " On Monday, May 16, Rita Gilbert Macintosh, 94, a former corporate art director and Montgomery County school speech therapist, died at home at Cathedral Village, a retirement community in Andorra.
NEWS
June 28, 2010 | By Julia Terruso, Inquirer Staff Writer
Rachel Sietz's family tree is rooted at Camp Ramah in the Poconos. Her grandfather worked as a rabbi at the Jewish overnight camp. Her grandmother, mother, aunt, and uncles on both sides spent their summers there. Sietz was a camper for seven years and a counselor for three. So when she graduated in the spring from Smith College with a degree in art history, she didn't knock herself out looking for a permanent job. She knew exactly where to go: back to the 68-acre, lakefront camp in Wayne County.
NEWS
August 13, 2008 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Energized by ice cream and watermelon, the young men and women from Chester took to the dance floor in the Black Cultural Center at Swarthmore College. Two days before, they had learned the rudiments of the waltz. Today they were trying the tango, a dance that's both sad and sexy. "I love it," said Angel Pabon after a couple of nimble turns. "It's kind of like math with your feet. " It had been a busy day for these lucky youths enrolled in TAP, The Achievement Project of Chester.
NEWS
October 23, 2007 | By Jonathan Zimmerman
Thousands of Americans will travel to colleges and universities this fall for "parents' weekend. " They'll wander leaf-strewn lawns and quadrangles with their sons and daughters, asking earnest questions about courses, sports and friends. Later, when they retire to the local Hilton, Sheraton or Holiday Inn, they might notice something funny: It looks a lot like their children's dormitory. Dorms are changing - to resemble hotels. Student centers have gotten makeovers, too. They look like museums or corporate office buildings.
NEWS
October 14, 2007 | By Gayle Ronan Sims INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Dyer Baizley, 90, may not have been a rebellious Quaker like her famous relative, but she had the conviction and feistiness of the 17th-century martyr Mary Dyer, whose statue represents defiant contemplation at the entrance to Friends Center at 15th and Cherry Streets. Mrs. Baizley died of pneumonia Oct. 5 at Roxborough Memorial Hospital. She had lived at Cathedral Village in Upper Roxborough for 11 years, but was a longtime resident of Chestnut Hill - and she was not a Quaker.
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