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NEWS
March 7, 2004 | By Rosalee Polk Rhodes INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Aurelia Bender was surprised and humbled when members of the South Jersey Music Teachers' Association presented her with a plaque for years of dedicated service. "I really appreciate your thoughtfulness," was all Bender could muster up to say when the 15 members of the group honored her during their monthly meeting Feb. 24. Bender, 82, a frail yet feisty woman, is a music connoisseur and a founder of the music teachers' association. She mastered the piano and devoted four decades to teaching the young and old to play and appreciate music.
NEWS
April 29, 2003 | By Sally A. Downey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Mary Chase Morrison, 92, an author who wrote about the joys of old age, died of heart failure April 19 at Kendal, a retirement community in Kennett Square. In 1998 Mrs. Morrison published Let Evening Come: Reflections on Aging, in which she wrote about the loss of energy, muscle tone and conventional beauty associated with aging. Yet, she said, there were many positives of old age: "Freedom to dare, the thrill of understanding, and a more mellow ego. " Acknowledging that time on earth is short and precious, she wrote that the prospect of death adds "quite a spice to life, and sharpens it up. " Mrs. Morrison grew up in New England and Florida.
SPORTS
December 19, 2001 | Daily News Wire Services
This is the start of No. 4 Florida's so-called silly season. With 26 straight points to open the second half against High Point, the Gators showed just how laughable December could become. In the first of four straight expected walkovers at home this month, the Gators got 18 points and 11 rebounds from Matt Bonner in a 103-49 victory last night. "That's what we're supposed to do when we play a team like High Point," Gators guard Brett Nelson said. "They're a pretty good team, but that's what we're supposed to do. " Nelson made four three-pointers and scored 18 points for the Gators (8-1)
NEWS
October 7, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Helen Barlow Clancy, 89, a retired architect who had designed public buildings and served on her local school board, died Monday of cancer at the Pennswood Village retirement community in Middletown Township, Bucks County. She had moved to the community 10 years ago from Jenkintown. After her marriage in 1937, Mrs. Clancy lived and worked in New England for several years. She resumed her career after moving to Jenkintown in 1947 and was employed by three major architectural firms, including Thalheimer & Weitz.
NEWS
June 2, 2000 | By Rusty Pray, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Sally Leopold Kusch, 79, managing editor of a Philadelphia textbook-publishing company, died Monday of lung cancer at Clara Burke Community, a nursing home in Plymouth Meeting. She had been a resident of Center City, but she had also lived in several Philadelphia suburban communities. She grew up in Elkins Park. Mrs. Kusch was the widow of Victor H. Kusch, a prominent Philadelphia architect who died in 1986. After taking time off to raise her children, Mrs. Kusch returned to publishing and in 1979 became one of the first project editors at Saunders College Publishing, a division of W.B. Saunders & Co. of Society Hill.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | By Herb Drill, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Prudence Wallis Suydam, 93, a former physical-education teacher who was honored for service to the community, died Thursday at the Pennswood Village retirement community in Middletown Township. As a young woman, she taught physical education at Smith College in Northampton, Mass., and then served with the Grenfell Medical Mission in Labrador, a facility established to provide medical care for fishermen. Mrs. Suydam resided in Doylestown Borough for 37 years before moving to Pennswood in 1984.
SPORTS
November 5, 1999 | By Scott Brown, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
This former South Jersey running back barges through tackles as if they are yellow lights, is chasing history as the college football season hits its stretch run - and, surprise, surprise, is not named Ron Dayne. Paul Smith, a 1996 graduate of Holy Spirit, toils in the shadow of the most famous battlefield in American history. Unfortunately for him, that is far from the spotlight that is regularly cast on major college battlefields. Gettysburg College is a Division III school in south-central Pennsylvania, and its games rarely get more than a line of small print in most major newspapers.
NEWS
October 12, 1999 | By Dominic Sama, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Marshall D. Schechter, 78, a psychiatrist who had recommended that custody of a black child remain with a white Downingtown foster couple, although a judge ruled otherwise, died last Tuesday at his home in Wynnewood. Dr. Schechter was professor emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and maintained a private practice from his home. He specialized in child and adolescent psychiatry. In September 1995, Senior Judge Alexander Endy of Chester County Court ruled that Alexa Howard, 4, should be removed from her white foster parents, B. William and Debra Fell, and placed with Darlene Herring, a black social worker in Washington, D.C. The Fells had raised the child for three years until July 1994, when the Chester County Department of Children, Youth and Families removed her from their custody.
NEWS
March 16, 1999 | By Bill Price, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Alice Whitten Lindborg, 87, formerly of Newtown Square, an artist, author and Swedish American historian, died Thursday at the Cathcart Health Center in Devon, where she had resided for three years. Mrs. Lindborg and her husband, artist and sculptor Carl E. Lindborg, who died in 1994, were dedicated to creating works of art and researching and writing on Newtown Township historical issues and Swedish American history. In 1993, they were presented with Charlotta Medals from the Emigrant Institute of Vaxjo, Sweden, for their "dedicated and longstanding services to the Swedish Emigrant Institute and cultural relations between Sweden and the inhabitants of Swedish background in the U.S. " After the ceremony, which was held in Devon, Mrs. Lindborg said, "It was pure happiness and gratitude.
NEWS
September 6, 1998 | By Barbara Claire Kasselmann, FOR THE INQUIRER
It was autumn in New England and I was headed to the college towns of Amherst and Northampton, amid the bucolic countryside and hills of what is known as the Pioneer Valley in west central Massachusetts. Pioneers settled the area around the Connecticut River in the 1630s, drawn by the region's beauty - the broad, blue river winding through a peaceful valley, surrounded by spectacular hills - and by its soil, which makes for some of the world's richest farmland. The area became known as "Paradise," and Northampton is called "Paradise City.
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