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NEWS
July 28, 2010 | By Melissa Dribben, Inquirer Staff Writer
Donna Limerick had always believed her mother was a pioneer. Not many women in the 1940s had the gumption and the bank loans to start their own business. Especially not African American women. Especially not African American women who designed and made millinery in Philadelphia. Still, Limerick didn't want to be presumptuous. She wasn't sure that her mother's legacy would qualify for the Smithsonian. A documentary producer for National Public Radio, Limerick had heard that the Smithsonian's new National Museum of African American History and Culture was looking for compelling stories about black families and culture.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | By Paul Anderson, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
The Smithsonian Institution, the nation's attic, will observe its 150th anniversary in 1996-97 by sending trunkloads of treasures on the road to a dozen cities. The 150 traveling items will range from George Washington's battle sword to Dizzy Gillespie's trumpet, from Amelia Earhart's flight suit to the Apollo 11 command module, and from Thomas Edison's light bulb to the sequined ruby-red slippers worn by Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz. And yes, kids, there will be dinosaurs - fossils, that is. The tour, which the Smithsonian hopes will be underwritten by corporate sponsors, was announced yesterday.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | By Jean Redstone, Special to The Inquirer
The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C., hangs the best work of the best American artists, living or dead. Some artists strive for decades, perfecting and refining their work but still are not among that select group. It took 9-year-old Peter Stahl 3d about two hours. The Westville boy, a fourth-grade student at Shady Lane School in Deptford, labored in class for two art periods and produced a winning work in the national Reading Is Fundamental poster contest. Last month, he was named one of four runners-up in the competition, which boasted 322,612 entries.
NEWS
April 3, 1998 | By Thomas Ferrick Jr., INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The Smithsonian Institution has taken the unusual step of firing the Philadelphia architectural firm in charge of designing the Museum of the American Indian on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. GBQC Architects of the 2400 block of Locust Street was awarded the contract for the $110 million museum in 1994, along with Douglas J. Cardinal, a Canadian architect of Blackfoot and Metis descent. The GBQC-Cardinal design was widely praised. Groundbreaking was scheduled for this fall.
NEWS
March 26, 1996 | By Ted Gup
The Smithsonian Institution, America's national museum, is observing its 150th anniversary with the largest traveling exhibition in U.S. history. But even as the museum publicly celebrates, many in its curatorial and scholarly ranks privately mark the occasion with grave apprehension. The Smithsonian, and countless other museums across the country, face one of the most insidious threats in their history as political correctness, hypersensitivity to issues of race and diversity and an emboldened far right threaten to neuter them.
LIVING
April 2, 2000 | By Annette John-Hall, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The gala opening set for Feb. 3 at the Smithsonian was supposed to mark a personal and professional milestone for Deborah Willis. Indeed, the "Reflections in Black" exhibition of African American photography, of which she was the curator, had been a labor of love 20 years in the making. Willis had involved her whole family in the project, including her son, Hank, and her nephew, Songha, who helped with the research. The cousins, who lived in New York, had made plans to attend the party.
NEWS
September 29, 1994 | Daily News Wire Services
Former first lady Barbara Bush reveals in her new book, "Barbara Bush: A Memoir" (Scribner's / $25), that she once asked the Smithsonian to remove some books she found offensive. During a tour of a 1992 show on first ladies at the National Museum of American History, Bush saw copies of Kitty Kelley's tell-all books, "Jackie, Oh!" and "Nancy Reagan" on display. "These were ugly books written by someone who did not know either woman, and both books were largely discredited," writes Bush.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2009 | By Steven Rea, Inquirer Movie Critic
Here's a factoid, courtesy of the Internet Movie Database: Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian marks the second time that Napoleon Bonaparte and Abraham Lincoln have appeared in the same film. The first? Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure . Which, by the way, is a vastly more meaningful moviegoing experience than this knee-jerk sequel to the surprise 2006 Ben Stiller smash. A super-size rehash of the original - transplanted from New York's Museum of Natural History to the sprawling mall of museums run by the Smithsonian in Washington - this family-friendly vehicle once again stars Stiller as the museum guard who communes with objects and artifacts on display after the doors close for the day. Except this time, as Night at the Museum - Part Duh begins, Stiller's Larry Daley is no longer employed as a guard.
NEWS
January 24, 1987
The Smithsonian Institution - which for good reason also is known as the "Nation's Attic" - announced that during 1986 it had acquired 942,000 new items for its extensive collection. Joining existing artifacts - such as Gen. P.H. Sheridan's stuffed horse, Dorothy's ruby slippers and a 1935 Girl Scout uniform - were old pieces of the Brooklyn Bridge, 10,000 Scandinavian moths and butterflies, the personal papers of Playboy illustrator Alberto Vargas, 300 calculators and President Warren G. Harding's top hat. News reports of these eclectic acquisitions arrived at a household we know just in time for the annual event, known there as The Expedition to the Back of the Closet, subtitled This Year We Have to Throw Something Out. The coincidence did not go unnoted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 9, 2015 | By Claire Sasko, Inquirer Staff Writer
Do you have a picture of Bruce Springsteen jamming in a New Jersey basement? Ever take a selfie with Elton John? It's time to visit your attic, dust off your old photo albums, and show the world how much you love rock-and-roll. The largest museum in the world wants to spotlight your snapshots. The Smithsonian Institution recently launched Rock 'n' Roll, a crowdsourced site that chronicles the rise of rowdy genre music through the lenses of concertgoers. The museum is accepting and publishing fans' photographs on rockandroll.si.edu and will accept submissions through Dec. 1, 2016.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHETHER or not you are a sports fan, there's no denying that sports have come to define America as much, if not more, than any other social institution. With the possible exception of a monster snowstorm, nothing unites a city or region more than a winning home team, collegiate or professional. Sports' crucial place in our society is the focus of a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit called "Hometown Teams. " The display runs March 22 through May 4 at the Noyes Arts Garage Stockton College, on the ground floor of the municipal parking garage in Atlantic City's Ducktown neighborhood.
NEWS
June 13, 2013 | By Lonnae O'Neal Parker, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Philanthropist and media mogul Oprah Winfrey is donating $12 million to the Smithsonian's National Museum of African American History and Culture, officials announced Tuesday. Combined with the $1 million she gave in 2007, it is the museum's largest donation. In recognition, Winfrey's name will go on a 350-seat theater. The chairwoman and chief executive of the Oprah Winfrey Network has been a member of the museum's advisory council since 2004. "I am so proud of African American history and its contributions to our nation as a whole," Winfrey said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 2012 | Bonnie S. Benwick, Washington Post
It was a party they didn't want to miss, and a deadline they had to make: Aug. 15, on what would have been Julia Child's 100th birthday. The very Smithsonian curators who had negotiated with the 89-year-old icon in her Cambridge, Mass., kitchen in 2001, catalogued the room's contents, packed them up, and created one of the National Museum of American History's most beloved exhibits, only to disassemble it a decade later for the sake of infrastructure improvement,...
ENTERTAINMENT
July 26, 2012 | By Danielle O'Steen, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - Craft is no longer a dirty word in the art world. Historically lauded for manual skill over artistic vision, craft has played the role of stepchild to fine art, perpetually placed in a lower category than the contemporary creations featured in top museums and galleries. But a younger generation of artists is redefining the field. That's the subtext of "40 Under 40: Craft Futures," the new exhibition at the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum. The exhibit celebrates craft's reblooming and also the museum's 40-year milestone.
NEWS
May 15, 2012 | By Jeff Gammage, Inquirer Staff Writer
The water ran out after the first day at sea. The boat engine quit on the second. Hien Cao, 22, clutched her 2-year-old daughter and 6-month-old son. They and 25 others had crowded onto a five-person fishing boat, the captain paid in gold to steer them to freedom. Now, the sun beating down as the vessel drifted off the southern coast of Vietnam, Cao felt numb. She'd taken this chance, this escape from a country that had become a prison, to give her children a better life.
NEWS
May 5, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - An energy businessman is donating a record $35 million to the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History to build a new dinosaur hall on the National Mall, the museum complex announced Thursday. The donation by David H. Koch, the executive vice president of Koch Industries Inc. of Wichita, Kan., is the single largest gift in the museum's 102-year history. The Smithsonian board of regents voted Monday to name the new dinosaur hall in Koch's honor. Koch, an engineer trained at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, is a billionaire who lives in New York.
NEWS
April 20, 2012 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
CHANTILLY, Va. - NASA turned over space shuttle Discovery on Thursday to the Smithsonian Institution, the first in its orbiter fleet to be transferred to a U.S. museum. The U.S. Marine Drum and Bugle Corps, astronauts including former Sen. John Glenn, and several thousand visitors with American flags greeted Discovery. It will retire as an artifact representing the 30-year shuttle program. The world's most traveled spaceship had been lifted off its Boeing 747 carrier and towed to the National Air and Space Museum's massive hangar facility near Washington Dulles International Airport.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Early sound recordings by Alexander Graham Bell that were packed away at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology that reads the sound with light and a 3D camera. "To be, or not to be," a man's voice can be heard saying in one recording, the speaker reciting a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy as a green wax disc crackles to life from computer speakers. Another recording on a copper negative disc that was played back at the Library of Congress reveals a trill of the tongue and someone reciting the numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
I. Michael Heyman, 81, who was the first nonscientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, after serving as chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, has died. Mr. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During five years as chief of the world's largest museum and research complex, Mr. Heyman oversaw creation of the Smithsonian's first website and an affiliations network that now includes 170 museums across the country.
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