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Smithsonian Institution

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NEWS
October 2, 1997 | Daily News Wire Services
You'd be hard pressed to think of a finer way to kill a Sunday afternoon in cyberspace than a visit to the Smithsonian Institution's new site for the National Museum of American History. The site - at http://www.si.edu/organiza/ museums/nmah/ - is a virtual crawl through America's greatest attic. The first set of exhibits includes pages on American wine, tool chests, World War II posters and ancient Greek coins. (At this point, the National Numismatic Collection is one of the few divisions of the museum to boast a fully developed Web exhibit program.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
I. Michael Heyman, 81, who was the first nonscientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, after serving as chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, has died. Mr. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During five years as chief of the world's largest museum and research complex, Mr. Heyman oversaw creation of the Smithsonian's first website and an affiliations network that now includes 170 museums across the country.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHETHER or not you are a sports fan, there's no denying that sports have come to define America as much, if not more, than any other social institution. With the possible exception of a monster snowstorm, nothing unites a city or region more than a winning home team, collegiate or professional. Sports' crucial place in our society is the focus of a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit called "Hometown Teams. " The display runs March 22 through May 4 at the Noyes Arts Garage Stockton College, on the ground floor of the municipal parking garage in Atlantic City's Ducktown neighborhood.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Early sound recordings by Alexander Graham Bell that were packed away at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology that reads the sound with light and a 3D camera. "To be, or not to be," a man's voice can be heard saying in one recording, the speaker reciting a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy as a green wax disc crackles to life from computer speakers. Another recording on a copper negative disc that was played back at the Library of Congress reveals a trill of the tongue and someone reciting the numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The African American Museum in Philadelphia has been named an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the first organization in the city to be chosen for the elite program, and one of only 65 organizations selected nationwide over the last four years. The affiliation allows the African American Museum to tap the vast resources of the Smithsonian, to borrow objects for exhibitions and programs, and to bolster educational initiatives and outreach programs. "We are really pleased," said Terrie S. Rouse, the museum's president and chief executive.
NEWS
January 16, 1998
There's been a firestorm over the Smithsonian Institution's plans to mark the 50th anniversary of the state of Israel. Only a few years since the Enola Gay flap, the prestigious organization has blundered into another mud fight in which its credibility has been challenged and damaged. There's plenty of blame to go around. At this point, the Smithsonian has been hit from two different directions. Critics called its initial plans for a 50th-anniversary lecture series an attack on Israel and its current government.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Maria Recio INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Lockheed Martin Corp. gave the National Air and Space Museum $10 million for a new annex, the aerospace manufacturer got a lot more than its name on the popular IMAX theater in the main building. It got a definite public relations nightmare. Some influential members of Congress had been watching with growing irritation as the Smithsonian Institution, parent organization of 16 government-supported museums along the National Mall, aggressively courted commercial donors.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The first chops, to the forehead, did not go through the bone and are perhaps evidence of hesitancy about the task. The next set, after the body was rolled over, was more effective. One cut split the skull all the way to the base. "The person is truly figuring it out as they go," said Douglas Owsley, a physical anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution. In the meantime, someone - perhaps with more experience - was working on a leg. The tibia bone is broken with a single blow, as one might do in butchering a cow. That's one possible version of an event that took place sometime during the winter of 1609-10 in Jamestown.
NEWS
July 15, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeologist Jeremy Sabloff spent most of his life unearthing lost civilizations and digging for buried scholastic treasure. These days, though, he is on an expedition into the labyrinthine mazes of Washington bureaucracy, searching for hidden savings, looking for expendable research, and generally digging for clues to save the Smithsonian Institution. Sabloff, director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology, chairs a panel of scientists trying keep the financially troubled Smithsonian afloat - without gutting the research behind the wonders that have endeared the Smithsonian to generations of Americans as "the nation's attic.
NEWS
May 19, 1995 | By Michael E. Ruane, INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
These days, the tourists surge past Gallery 103 in the Smithsonian's Air and Space Museum with scarcely a glance - barely noticing the guard out front, or the panels blocking the entrance, or the burnished airplane tail that towers in the dim background. No one seems to know that the tail, like a silver shark fin, signals the quiet return of one of the most bitter controversies in the Smithsonian Institution's history: the battle over the Enola Gay. The debate erupted anew yesterday in Congress, as legislators argued with historians, pondered the Smithsonian's mission, and heard museum officials faintly preview yet another attempt to exhibit the plane that dropped the atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945.
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NEWS
September 10, 2014 | By Sandy Bauers, Inquirer Staff Writer
Here they lie, 43 creatures and plants that are no more. Assembled in cases at the Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University - in a library normally closed to the public - are birds stuffed with cotton, jars holding a snake and a bat, insects pinned to display boards. Most natural history museum specimens are, of course, dead. But the demise of the ones in this new exhibit - "Mortal Remains: Animals That Have Perished from the Face of the Earth in Recent Times" - held greater implications.
NEWS
March 7, 2014 | BY CHUCK DARROW, Daily News Staff Writer darrowc@phillynews.com, 215-313-3134
WHETHER or not you are a sports fan, there's no denying that sports have come to define America as much, if not more, than any other social institution. With the possible exception of a monster snowstorm, nothing unites a city or region more than a winning home team, collegiate or professional. Sports' crucial place in our society is the focus of a Smithsonian Institution traveling exhibit called "Hometown Teams. " The display runs March 22 through May 4 at the Noyes Arts Garage Stockton College, on the ground floor of the municipal parking garage in Atlantic City's Ducktown neighborhood.
NEWS
May 2, 2013 | By David Brown, Washington Post
WASHINGTON - The first chops, to the forehead, did not go through the bone and are perhaps evidence of hesitancy about the task. The next set, after the body was rolled over, was more effective. One cut split the skull all the way to the base. "The person is truly figuring it out as they go," said Douglas Owsley, a physical anthropologist at the Smithsonian Institution. In the meantime, someone - perhaps with more experience - was working on a leg. The tibia bone is broken with a single blow, as one might do in butchering a cow. That's one possible version of an event that took place sometime during the winter of 1609-10 in Jamestown.
TRAVEL
April 15, 2013 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - There are probably more free things to do in the U.S. capital than in nearly any other major city in the world. The most popular museums and the zoo are free, thanks to government funding, as well as the picturesque memorials and monuments. With so many free options, the biggest challenge might be narrowing down what to see.   Smithsonian Institution No visit to the nation's capital is complete without stopping at the nation's museums. First-time visitors learn fast that the Smithsonian is not one place.
NEWS
December 14, 2011 | By Brett Zongker, Associated Press
WASHINGTON - Early sound recordings by Alexander Graham Bell that were packed away at the Smithsonian Institution for more than a century were played publicly for the first time Tuesday using new technology that reads the sound with light and a 3D camera. "To be, or not to be," a man's voice can be heard saying in one recording, the speaker reciting a portion of Hamlet's Soliloquy as a green wax disc crackles to life from computer speakers. Another recording on a copper negative disc that was played back at the Library of Congress reveals a trill of the tongue and someone reciting the numbers 1-2-3-4-5-6.
NEWS
November 23, 2011
I. Michael Heyman, 81, who was the first nonscientist to lead the Smithsonian Institution, after serving as chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley, has died. Mr. Heyman died at his Berkeley home Saturday after a long battle with emphysema. The Smithsonian and the university announced his death Monday. During five years as chief of the world's largest museum and research complex, Mr. Heyman oversaw creation of the Smithsonian's first website and an affiliations network that now includes 170 museums across the country.
NEWS
July 28, 2002 | By Maria Recio INQUIRER WASHINGTON BUREAU
When Lockheed Martin Corp. gave the National Air and Space Museum $10 million for a new annex, the aerospace manufacturer got a lot more than its name on the popular IMAX theater in the main building. It got a definite public relations nightmare. Some influential members of Congress had been watching with growing irritation as the Smithsonian Institution, parent organization of 16 government-supported museums along the National Mall, aggressively courted commercial donors.
NEWS
July 15, 2002 | By Faye Flam INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Archaeologist Jeremy Sabloff spent most of his life unearthing lost civilizations and digging for buried scholastic treasure. These days, though, he is on an expedition into the labyrinthine mazes of Washington bureaucracy, searching for hidden savings, looking for expendable research, and generally digging for clues to save the Smithsonian Institution. Sabloff, director of the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Anthropology and Archaeology, chairs a panel of scientists trying keep the financially troubled Smithsonian afloat - without gutting the research behind the wonders that have endeared the Smithsonian to generations of Americans as "the nation's attic.
NEWS
March 24, 2001 | By Stephan Salisbury INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The African American Museum in Philadelphia has been named an affiliate of the Smithsonian Institution, the first organization in the city to be chosen for the elite program, and one of only 65 organizations selected nationwide over the last four years. The affiliation allows the African American Museum to tap the vast resources of the Smithsonian, to borrow objects for exhibitions and programs, and to bolster educational initiatives and outreach programs. "We are really pleased," said Terrie S. Rouse, the museum's president and chief executive.
NEWS
January 16, 1998
There's been a firestorm over the Smithsonian Institution's plans to mark the 50th anniversary of the state of Israel. Only a few years since the Enola Gay flap, the prestigious organization has blundered into another mud fight in which its credibility has been challenged and damaged. There's plenty of blame to go around. At this point, the Smithsonian has been hit from two different directions. Critics called its initial plans for a 50th-anniversary lecture series an attack on Israel and its current government.
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