CollectionsSmoke Screen
IN THE NEWS

Smoke Screen

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 13, 1987
Charles W. Bowser's reply to his critics is typically a "losing" attorney's response when he does not have a valid defense. He resorts to a smoke-screening technique because he must say something to defend his actions. In his response, he left out the basic inflammatory comments. Why? If he believed them to be correct he should restate them proudly. Whether he cares to admit it, Mr. Bowser is a prominent leader in the black community because he is a partner in a law firm and because of his political status.
NEWS
December 4, 2000 | by Josh Mitteldorf
Ever since Councilman Nutter introduced smoke-free workplace legislation in May, there's been a loud and heated controversy over the issue. Even though the legislation covers workplaces in general, all of the debate has focused on restaurants. You may be thinking that this is a typical conflict between health and environmental interests on one side, business profits on the other. This is exactly what the cigarette companies want you to think. In fact, there will be no losses to restaurants.
SPORTS
May 2, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles twice passed on Geno Smith, and it's reasonable to wonder whether their interest in the West Virginia quarterback was ever that significant. This topic was debated leading up to the draft, and intrigue was added when owner Jeffrey Lurie accompanied coach Chip Kelly and general manager Howie Roseman on a personal scouting visit to West Virginia. "First off, it wasn't a smoke screen," Kelly said Tuesday morning on WIP-FM (94.1). "We were as thorough with Geno as anyone else with our evaluation.
NEWS
December 15, 1990 | By ELLEN GOODMAN
Over the years, I have developed a grudging and entirely perverse admiration for the tobacco industry. The corporate heads, the lawyers, the lobbyists could teach Outward Bound a thing or two about survival skills. Every time the cigarette pushers are cornered into an hypocrisy, terminally trapped in an inconsistency, forced up against a scientific wall, they get loose. They go off whistling, and jiggling the extra change in their pockets. But their current ploy has a can-you-top-this quality.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is one of America's most prized public-health secrets. And it is locked in the boardrooms of the nation's major cigarette companies. Will smoking rates fall as a result of price increases announced by the companies recently to pay for a $206 billion deal with 46 states? In particular, will fewer children smoke? Or will tobacco companies, using the complicated financial structure of the deal, find ways to discount prices and keep people smoking? "No one outside of the industry can predict precisely what will happen to cigarette consumption this year," said Kenneth Warner, an expert on health policy at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
NEWS
December 20, 1993
A week ago, we were sadly certain that the Pennsylvania House of Representatives would approve legislation overturning local ordinances banning assault weapons - setting back efforts to curb violence in Pittsburgh and Philadelphia. We envisioned the gun-loving majority of legislators voting - like the sportsmen's club members many of them are - to keep gun access easy, even if the price is lives lost in the cities, far from the woodsy tranquility of their hunting grounds. Happily, our scenario was all wrong.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
MICHELLE Malkin's most recent column, in which she seeks to diminish African-Americans' demands for reparations, is one of many instances that the Daily News has dutifully trotted her out as a token "woman of color" to give validity to thinly disguised racism. Her claim that the Filipino people should sue the U.S. government, Spain and the Catholic Church for crimes against humanity could be taken seriously if she weren't using that as a smoke screen - and I agree with her that the Filipino people should receive reparations from the above criminals.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
George Parry is a former state and federal prosecutor practicing law in Philadelphia The exciting word is spreading through the "Occupy Wall Street" picket line that President Obama is about to straighten out yet another segment of the immoral capitalist class that has been gleefully polluting the planet in pursuit of obscene profits. Unlike the customary big-business types, who are easily identified by their corporate jets, expensive suits, pinkie rings, and cigars the size of small baseball bats, this group hides behind an earnest, salt-of-the-earth image.
SPORTS
September 23, 2005 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the reasons the Phillies say they still are in the National League wild-card race is the more relaxed atmosphere in the clubhouse (i.e. no Larry Bowa). Bowa is working for ESPN and XM Radio this season, but he talked Wednesday on WFAN-AM (660) in New York about recent comments by former players, specifically those made in this week's Sports Illustrated. "There's a lot of sensitive players on that team, and a lot of them really did not like the fact that I had played in Philly, won a World Series in Philly," he told the radio station.
NEWS
May 16, 1986 | By Robert Seltzer, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Municipal Court judge has convicted Gloucester City Mayor Robert Bevan of simple assault for forcibly removing the city treasurer's son from a closed council session in March. Brooklawn Judge John Jehl, who issued the decision Wednesday night, fined the mayor $105, including court costs. In an interview yesterday, Bevan said he would not appeal the ruling. "Appeal?" the mayor asked. "No, I'm not going to appeal. I don't want to cost the taxpayers any more money. " Bevan had been accused of simple assault by Robert Gorman, 24, an accounting student at Rutgers University in Camden.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 2, 2013 | By Zach Berman, Inquirer Staff Writer
The Eagles twice passed on Geno Smith, and it's reasonable to wonder whether their interest in the West Virginia quarterback was ever that significant. This topic was debated leading up to the draft, and intrigue was added when owner Jeffrey Lurie accompanied coach Chip Kelly and general manager Howie Roseman on a personal scouting visit to West Virginia. "First off, it wasn't a smoke screen," Kelly said Tuesday morning on WIP-FM (94.1). "We were as thorough with Geno as anyone else with our evaluation.
NEWS
October 9, 2011
George Parry is a former state and federal prosecutor practicing law in Philadelphia The exciting word is spreading through the "Occupy Wall Street" picket line that President Obama is about to straighten out yet another segment of the immoral capitalist class that has been gleefully polluting the planet in pursuit of obscene profits. Unlike the customary big-business types, who are easily identified by their corporate jets, expensive suits, pinkie rings, and cigars the size of small baseball bats, this group hides behind an earnest, salt-of-the-earth image.
NEWS
November 23, 2005
Street still trying to wriggle through a loophole Marcia Gelbart buried the lead in her Nov. 17 article, "$1 million worth of ethics. " The big story is not the costs associated with cleaning up City Hall in the wake of the referendum question on Election Day. Besides sounding like a smoke screen, the $1 million should pay for itself in the first year of cleaner business in Philadelphia. The real lead is that even though 87 percent of the voters in Philadelphia voted for ethics reform, the administration is still trying to use a loophole to do business as usual when it comes to bond transactions, the very reason for the federal corruption investigations and the bug in Mayor Street's office.
SPORTS
September 23, 2005 | By Todd Zolecki INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
One of the reasons the Phillies say they still are in the National League wild-card race is the more relaxed atmosphere in the clubhouse (i.e. no Larry Bowa). Bowa is working for ESPN and XM Radio this season, but he talked Wednesday on WFAN-AM (660) in New York about recent comments by former players, specifically those made in this week's Sports Illustrated. "There's a lot of sensitive players on that team, and a lot of them really did not like the fact that I had played in Philly, won a World Series in Philly," he told the radio station.
NEWS
March 5, 2003 | By Carl Golden
There's a smoke screen in the proposal to increase the state income tax on the wealthy. It's the common wisdom that New Jersey residents overwhelmingly support such a tax increase because the vast majority of those polled would not be affected. Obviously, taxing-the-other-guy is an extraordinarily strong common bond. But focusing on that aspect of the issue overlooks the greater concern. Those who aren't wealthy know that taxing the rich, while helping Gov. McGreevey out of his budget dilemma, would do nothing to solve their problems in a state where economic survival is increasingly tough.
NEWS
September 13, 2002
MICHELLE Malkin's most recent column, in which she seeks to diminish African-Americans' demands for reparations, is one of many instances that the Daily News has dutifully trotted her out as a token "woman of color" to give validity to thinly disguised racism. Her claim that the Filipino people should sue the U.S. government, Spain and the Catholic Church for crimes against humanity could be taken seriously if she weren't using that as a smoke screen - and I agree with her that the Filipino people should receive reparations from the above criminals.
NEWS
December 4, 2000 | by Josh Mitteldorf
Ever since Councilman Nutter introduced smoke-free workplace legislation in May, there's been a loud and heated controversy over the issue. Even though the legislation covers workplaces in general, all of the debate has focused on restaurants. You may be thinking that this is a typical conflict between health and environmental interests on one side, business profits on the other. This is exactly what the cigarette companies want you to think. In fact, there will be no losses to restaurants.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2000 | By Steven Rea, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
A corner cigar shop in Brooklyn - pre-cigar chic, with not a single A-type e-commerce 24-year-old millionaire in sight - is the setting for Smoke, filmmaker Wayne Wang's loose and lovely 1995 collaboration with the novelist Paul Auster. Harvey Keitel stars as Auggie Wren, proprietor of the unassuming neighborhood tobacco shop - and a closet photographer, poet and muser who meets and greets a parade of customers each day. Among them: an Auster-like novelist (William Hurt); a student (Harold Perrineau Jr.)
NEWS
October 19, 1999 | By Ellen Goodman
Up to now, my all-time favorite oxymoron has been "Jumbo Shrimp. " There is something so delicious about the name of these over-undersized crustaceans. But now the big-little critters have been put aside; we have bigger fish to fry. The Oxymoron of the Moment is - ta-da - "responsible cigarette manufacturer. " This phrase comes courtesy of the archenemy of lungs everywhere. As the little guy in the classic ad used to bellow: "CALL FOR PHILIP MOR-RIS!" The giant company, home of the Marlboro Man and the slim Virginia, has just launched a glitzy new Web page campaign to buff up its corporate image and maybe its stock price.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | By Shankar Vedantam, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
It is one of America's most prized public-health secrets. And it is locked in the boardrooms of the nation's major cigarette companies. Will smoking rates fall as a result of price increases announced by the companies recently to pay for a $206 billion deal with 46 states? In particular, will fewer children smoke? Or will tobacco companies, using the complicated financial structure of the deal, find ways to discount prices and keep people smoking? "No one outside of the industry can predict precisely what will happen to cigarette consumption this year," said Kenneth Warner, an expert on health policy at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|