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Smoke Signals

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NEWS
October 25, 1999 | by Mark Angeles, Daily News Staff Writer
Anti-smoking educator Sterlen Barr is getting some help from an unlikely ally: the world's biggest tobacco company. Two weeks ago, the Philip Morris Co., maker of Marlboro cigarettes, acknowledged that smoking is dangerous and addictive, a move that experts say was a calculated legal effort to protect Philip Morris from lawsuits by smokers who might contend that they were unaware of the dangers. "There is an overwhelming medical and scientific consensus that cigarette smoking causes lung cancer, heart disease, emphysema and other serious diseases in smokers" is the no-nonsense warning on the Philip Morris Web site, www.philipmorris.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 1987 | By MARY FLANNERY, Daily News Staff Writer
Michael J. Fox is positively oozing intensity in a full-page, close-up photograph in a recent issue of Rolling Stone. His jet-black sweater is pulled over his hunched shoulders, his hazel eyes have a no-nonense penetration, his fingers are holding a cigarette. A cigarette??? A dirty, cancer-causing, disgusting weed in the hand of the clean-cut, All- American boy, the hearthrob of "Family Ties" and "Back to the Future"? Yes, it's true. The young man is a chain-smoker. And for Rolling Stone, he agreed to reveal this aspect of his personal life.
NEWS
September 19, 2004 | By Nancy A. Youssef INQUIRER FOREIGN STAFF
It's going to be a good day, the American soldiers thought as they left the base and started their patrol in the most dangerous part of Baghdad. On the decrepit streets lined with raw sewage and garbage, Iraqi men silently stared down the passing humvees, sometimes with arms crossed. One man stepped out of his shop and spit toward the convoy. Children ran along the patrol route, waving, cheering, and begging for candy. A dirty look is better than no one out at all, the soldiers said.
NEWS
July 3, 1998 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
There have been movies about American Indians before, but "Smoke Signals" claims to be the first one with the proper credentials - conceived, written, directed and co-produced by Native Americans. This kind of on-the-cheap, grass-roots authenticity can be a mixed blessing. While watching such productions, viewers can be forgiven for wondering what Jerry Bruckheimer, to pick a name, might have done with the same material and about $50 million in Hollywood money. Or Kevin Costner, whose well-meaning "Dances with Wolves," is roasted pretty thoroughly in "Smoke Signals," a movie with a lively contempt for Hollywood treatment of Indian stories.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
From John Ford's Cheyenne Autumn (1964) to Kevin Costner's Dances With Wolves (1990), the dominant tone in Hollywood films chronicling the unconscionable treatment of the Indians has been one of sobering and long-overdue guilt. In Smoke Signals, the first widely distributed feature to be directed, written and coproduced by Indians, you might expect the view from the other side to be filled with pent-up rage or solemn elegy for their oppressed ancestors. Instead first-time director Christopher Eyre and Sherman Alexie, the gifted Indian novelist and poet, approach their film with an offbeat, subversive humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 1998 | By Desmond Ryan, INQUIRER MOVIE CRITIC
In a dilapidated trailer, the cavalry is chasing whooping Indians on a battered old black-and-white TV. Three young American Indians sit on a couch and watch. "The only thing worse than Indians on TV," muses one of them, "is Indians watching Indians on TV. " The archly funny line in Smoke Signals defines both the humor of a unique film and the kind of Hollywood stereotyping it ingeniously rebuts. Smoke Signals, which opens tomorrow at the Ritz at the Bourse and Ritz Twelve/NJ, is the first widely distributed feature about American Indians to be made by American Indians.
SPORTS
November 27, 2008 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not budging Relax, Dolphins fans. Joey Porter is sorry he refused to come off the field late in Sunday's loss to the Patriots. The star linebacker is sorry he committed penalties for unnecessary roughness and unsportsmanlike conduct in the same series. He's sorry he blew off head coach Tony Sparano and defensive coordinator Paul Pasqualoni after they did everything but send up smoke signals to get him off the field. He's sorry he ordered backup Charlie Anderson back to the bench.
SPORTS
May 24, 1996 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Darren Daulton doesn't agree with Phillies general manager Lee Thomas, who said earlier this week that the catcher-turned-leftfielder could be back in the lineup shortly after the All-Star break. Heck, Daulton thinks he can be back a whole lot sooner than that. "I'm 99 percent sure I'm going to come back and play in the near future," he said from his Pinellas County, Fla., home yesterday as the Phillies prepared to play the Padres on the opposite edge of the continent. "And the 1 percent is I could break my leg tomorrow.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | BY KATHLEEN SHEA Daily News wire services contributed to this report
CANDY GRAM: Hey, stupid Cupid . . . with six shopping days until Valentine's Day upon us, some love-ly trivia. V-day, it's thought, dates back to the ancient Roman festival of Lupercalia, dedicated to Pan, the god of fertility, and Juno, goddess of married life. It's not clear which saint or martyr the Christians had in mind when they appropriated and renamed the day. Most likely candidate is a Valentine beheaded on Feb. 14, 269 A.D., in Rome after converting his prison guard.
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | ELLEN GREY Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HIGH-TECH met low-tech in Vatican City yesterday, and low-tech won. For a few delicious minutes, TV news anchors and their panels of pundits were reduced to the level of ordinary mortals, peering into their monitors to try to determine whether the smoke rising from the stack atop the Sistine Chapel was white or black, and whether what they were seeing was the first announcement of a new pope or merely a signal that the choice still lay in the...
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NEWS
July 11, 2014 | BY CHRIS BRENNAN & SOLOMON LEACH, Daily News Staff Writers brennac@phillynews.com, 215-854-5973
THE MARLBORO Man and Joe Camel helped push into legislative limbo a new $2-per-pack tobacco tax in Philly that would help to fund the city's public schools. Harrisburg lobbyists for the nation's largest cigarette company, the Altria Group - maker of the Marlboro, Parliament and Virginia Slims brands - initially had opposed the tax altogether. A lobbyist for the nation's second-largest cigarette company, R.J. Reynolds - maker of Camel, Pall Mall and Kool brands - also was involved in the effort.
NEWS
March 17, 2014
THE MOST recent burning issue to be dragged before City Council resulted in both heat and light and a peculiar arrangement of the political constellation. Council was hearing testimony on whether electronic cigarettes, so-called smokeless cigarettes, which do not burn, should be treated the same as tobacco cigarettes, which do burn and emit smoke. Presenting the all-clear (among others) was Bill Godshall, executive director of SmokeFreePA, an anti-smoking organization opposed to the legislation sponsored by Councilman Bill Greenlee.
NEWS
March 14, 2013 | By Nicole Winfield, Associated Press
VATICAN CITY - This time there was no doubt. There was no new pope yet, and the mystery of who - and when - was as thick as the unmistakable heavy black smoke billowing from the Sistine Chapel chimney. As thousands waited in a cold night rain in St. Peter's Square, the cardinals signaled Tuesday that they had failed on their first attempt to find a leader for the world's 1.2 billion Catholics and their troubled church. "It's black, it's black, it's waaay black!" screamed Eliza Nagle, a 21-year-old Notre Dame theology major on an exchange program in Rome, as the smoke poured from the 6-foot-high copper chimney.
NEWS
February 13, 2013 | BY WILL BUNCH, Daily News Staff Writer bunchw@phillynews.com, 215-854-2957
THERE'S a very good chance that the next pope will hail from Africa. But there's an even better chance that he'll be the first pope to use an iPhone. The stunning news Monday that 85-year-old Pope Benedict XVI will be the first pontiff in nearly six centuries to resign gives the 1.2 billion-member Roman Catholic Church another crack at what it passed up on in 2005: The opportunity to elect a pope who truly reflects the complexities of the 21st century. "For the first time, the pope will be used to having a computer on his desk and a smartphone in his pocket," enthused Rocco Palmo, the Philadelphian who chronicles Vatican affairs on his popular blog Whispers in the Loggia.
SPORTS
September 6, 2012 | By Ladd Biro, For The Inquirer
Your draft is in the books, or will be shortly. The Cowboys and Giants kick off the NFL season Wednesday night. The wait is nearly over for those of us whose lives seem just a tad incomplete without the thrill of fantasy football competition. These final hours seem to be more than some of you can handle, however. My Twitter account has been lit up with questions about various trade scenarios from owners who've apparently been staring at their rosters a little too hard and feel the need to do something, anything, to better position themselves for success out of the gate.
SPORTS
November 27, 2008 | By Gary Miles, Inquirer Staff Writer
Not budging Relax, Dolphins fans. Joey Porter is sorry he refused to come off the field late in Sunday's loss to the Patriots. The star linebacker is sorry he committed penalties for unnecessary roughness and unsportsmanlike conduct in the same series. He's sorry he blew off head coach Tony Sparano and defensive coordinator Paul Pasqualoni after they did everything but send up smoke signals to get him off the field. He's sorry he ordered backup Charlie Anderson back to the bench.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 28, 2008 | By Craig LaBan, Inquirer Restaurant Critic
The plumes of mesquite smoke that curled out of the oil-drum barbecue were working slow magic on the meats inside - the Wagyu eyes of round, the mapled slabs of bacon, and the chile-rubbed shoulders of heritage pork, all destined for Cafe Estelle's tables. But smoke signals, puffing from that rusty rig in a side lot of an apartment building on North Fourth Street, were about all Cafe Estelle had to let the wider world know it exists. It's not easy to spot from passing traffic. And there's not much traffic anyway rumbling through this old industrial zone between Northern Liberties and Old City, just south of Spring Garden.
SPORTS
July 27, 2007 | by Paul Hagen
WHEN THE GAVEL comes down Tuesday afternoon, signaling the end of trading without waivers, deals will have been made, the pennant races will have been altered and it will be pretty easy to figure out - on paper - which teams have helped themselves the most. What can be more difficult to decipher is how moves, or lack of moves, will impact the clubhouse psyche. Just the seductive whisper that they could be close to getting Mark Teixeira from the Rangers for uberprospect Jarrod Saltalamacchia , shortstop prospect Elvis Andrus and a minor league pitcher was a pick-me-up for the Braves.
NEWS
June 23, 2006 | By JOAN L. KRAJEWSKI
THE PHILADELPHIA smoking ban passed in City Council during our last session on June 15. I voted against the ban, and it is no secret that I'm a former smoker. But I feel strongly that if you're going to ban smoking in bars, restaurants and nightclubs as well as in other public places in the city of Philadelphia, then you should ban it in the entire state of Pennsylvania. Both of our next-door neighbors, the states of New Jersey and Delaware, have enacted a statewide smoking ban. Seven other states, including New York, have also banned smoking in public places like restaurants and bars.
NEWS
April 20, 2005 | ELLEN GREY Daily News wire services contributed to this report
HIGH-TECH met low-tech in Vatican City yesterday, and low-tech won. For a few delicious minutes, TV news anchors and their panels of pundits were reduced to the level of ordinary mortals, peering into their monitors to try to determine whether the smoke rising from the stack atop the Sistine Chapel was white or black, and whether what they were seeing was the first announcement of a new pope or merely a signal that the choice still lay in the...
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