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NEWS
June 13, 2006
WHY DOES Novella K. Lyons feel the need to segment the fight for clean air in the workplace? This is an issue that has absolutely nothing to do with race, yet she finds the need to mention lung-cancer rates for African-American males only, not once pointing out that maybe the reason for such high numbers is that one in every five adult African-Americans are smokers. Let's keep the focus on making it safer for food-service workers of all colors. Deric L. Adger, Philadelphia
NEWS
September 12, 2008
IT'S unbelievable that the state leggies and governor would pick a day that will live forever in our hearts and minds to be the start of a socialist smoking law? The arrogance of the anti-smoking cartel and anti-small business pols to not only enact this socialist law but to implement it on 9/11. Geesh! Don Minichino, Stormville, N.Y.
NEWS
September 7, 1986
Recently the National Academy of Sciences stated that cigarette smoking on board aircraft should be banned altogether because cigarette smoke may be harmful to nonsmokers and the crew. Being a reformed cigarette smoker, I can state unequivocally that cigarette smoke to me is obnoxious on an aircraft whether it is near me or a passing breeze. Inasmuch as cigarette smoking has never been demonstrated to improve anyone's health, inasmuch as it has been demonstrated to be harmful to the health of those who smoke, inasmuch as cigarette smoking is usually bothersome to the nonsmoker, I heartily agree that cigarette smoking should be banned.
NEWS
June 3, 1988 | By Daniel LeDuc, Inquirer Staff Writer
The signs used to say, "Thank You for Not Smoking. " Now, they insist, "If You Smoke, Don't Exhale. " Restaurant patrons storm up to smokers and demand that they stub out their cigarettes. Throughout the country, hundreds of laws that restrict smoking force smokers to puff in bathrooms and closets. In at least one case in Southern California, a woman was refused a job because she smoked. And last month, smoking was banned on commercial airline flights of less than two hours. Those are some visible signs of what more and more people believe: Smoking is no longer a nasty habit, but a harmful practice, and people who continue to smoke deserve to have their judgment questioned.
NEWS
November 25, 1987 | By Nancy Nowicki, Special to The Inquirer
Last month, Cherry Hill Moving & Storage Co. banned smoking in its office. On Thursday, the moving company, in association with the American Cancer Society, took its anti-smoking campaign on the road. One of its 45-foot moving vans traveled around Camden and Gloucester Counties asking residents to give up smoking during the Cancer Society's annual "Great American Smokeout. " During a new segment of the nationwide event, the moving company's van hosted the "Great American Sign-up.
NEWS
April 7, 1990 | By Russell E. Eshleman Jr., Inquirer Harrisburg Bureau
The chairman of the Senate Health and Welfare Committee wants the state to help medical-assistance recipients quit smoking. Sen. John E. Peterson (R., Venango) has introduced legislation that would provide $133,000 to the Department of Public Welfare next year for people who use prescriptions or enter programs designed to help them stop smoking. "The studies have shown that the cost of providing some of the deterrents is a lot less than taking care of some of the consequential health problems that arise," said Barbara Gleim, executive director of the committee.
NEWS
November 27, 2010
The Food and Drug Administration's plan for gruesome warnings on cigarette packaging will help public health officials level the playing field in a way that could save lives. With authority granted by Congress in 2009, the FDA has ordered that half of every cigarette pack - both front and back - must contain a photo depicting the health ills of smoking, as well as the blunt warning that "Smoking can kill you. " Not for the faint of heart, these shocking images: About two years from now, cigarette packs will display diseased lungs, toe-tagged bodies, terminally ill cancer patients, and the like.
NEWS
November 11, 1997 | By Aileen Soper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Three security guards hired by the district to catch underage smokers at Friday's football playoff game against Plymouth-Whitemarsh handed out four $50 citations to violators, school officials said yesterday. The district spent $200 on the extra security to crack down on what students and administrators said was a problem at home games. Until now, the district has not aggressively enforced its no-smoking policy at the stadium, school officials said. "I think it [the enforcement effort]
NEWS
March 15, 2004 | By Diane G. Oaks
While waiting for a haircut at a Bucks County salon, I flipped through the February GQ magazine. Hunkster Ashton Kutcher, prominently holding a cigarette, caught my eye in a photo layout reminiscent of old Hollywood. This blatant marketing placement by the tobacco industry shocked me. It is regrettable that such stars as Nicole Kidman and Lara Flynn Boyle lack the good sense to refrain from smoking in public, where they are photographed. Apparently, like Kutcher, they fail to grasp the meaning of role models.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Jonathan Tamari, Jason Laughlin, and Craig R. McCoy, STAFF WRITERS
WASHINGTON - The engineer on Amtrak Train 188 remembers speeding up, he remembers a curve in Philadelphia that can "sneak up," and he remembers his body lurching as the locomotive entered the bend much too fast just before it derailed last May, killing eight people and injuring more than 200. But the engineer, Brandon Bostian, told investigators that he remembered little about the exact moment the train hurtled off the rails. And he did not explain why it sped to 106 mph as it approached a 50-mph curve, according to transcripts of two interviews released by the National Transportation Safety Board on Monday.
NEWS
February 3, 2016 | By Sam Wood, Staff Writer
The pediatrician who led New York City's health department through major campaigns against tobacco and sugary soda was named by Mayor Kenney on Monday to head Philadelphia's Department of Public Health. Thomas A. Farley, 59, replaces acting Health Commissioner Jane Baker. He will start Feb. 16. Farley, who served under Mayor Michael Bloomberg from 2009 to 2014, is often credited with helping to make the city one of the healthiest in America. Life expectancy for New Yorkers during the Bloomberg administration grew by three years, while across the nation it rose by 1.7 years.
NEWS
January 21, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
Gov. Christie acted Tuesday on more than 100 pieces of legislation, vetoing bills that would ban firearms for certain criminals, raise the smoking age, and preserve nonprofit hospitals' property-tax exemption. Christie, a Republican running for president, had until Tuesday to take action on bills the Legislature passed during the lame-duck session between November's election and the start of the new legislative session last week. He "pocket vetoed" dozens of bills, meaning he did not sign them into law or officially reject them.
NEWS
January 7, 2016 | By Robert Moran, STAFF WRITER
SEPTA's regional rail travel got jammed in Center City Tuesday afternoon after a report of smoke in a train caused rush-hour delays of up to an hour. Smoke was reportedly being emitted from overhead equipment on a Warminster Line train between Jefferson Station and 30th Street Station about 5:50 p.m., said SEPTA spokesman Andrew Busch. The train arrived at 30th Street and the passengers were evacuated. The train was placed out of service for investigation. Commuters reported hearing at an announcement at Jefferson Station suggesting they find alternative transportation.
FOOD
December 18, 2015
Here's a quick meal designed to get you in and out of the kitchen faster than you can say "holiday baking holiday decorating holiday shopping. " Smoked Salmon and Avocado Eggs Benedict 2 servings   For the sauce: 4 tablespoons butter 1 lime 1 large egg 1/4 to 1/2 teaspoon chipotle powder 1 to 2 teaspoons distilled vinegar Water (optional) For assembly 2 large eggs 2 English muffins, preferably whole-wheat Flesh of 1 ripe avocado 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 4 ounces thinly sliced smoked salmon 1. For the sauce: melt in the microwave on low, then let cool for 2 minutes.
NEWS
November 20, 2015
FOP PRESIDENT John McNesby, everybody is saying how great Jim Kenney will be as mayor. He already said he will continue the illegal "sanctuary city" policy for illegals. Jim Kenney has not put his hand on the Bible yet. He already is saying he will not obey the law. My question is how do we in law enforcement support him? He already said he will defy the law. The FOP needs to tell Mayor-elect Kenney we do not support his illegal policy. Jim Kenney is like the little kid: My ball, my rules.
NEWS
November 17, 2015 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
Thousands of people who are hospitalized with mental illness in the Philadelphia region will soon experience what has long been the reality for everyone else: living smoke-free. All psychiatric hospitals that have contracts with the city must ban all forms of tobacco, inside and outdoors, among patients and staff, on Dec. 14. All but one is including visitors in the policy, as well. The conventional wisdom is that banning smoking could make matters worse by, among other things, aggravating behavioral problems.
NEWS
October 20, 2015
ISSUE | CIGARETTE TAX An effective tool to combat smoking The commentary attacking cigarette taxes ("Cigarette-tax increases are bad for Pa. business," Wednesday) contained several inaccuracies. Studies have shown that cigarette taxes are an effective strategy for decreasing smoking and reducing smoking-related diseases and deaths. Research also shows that higher tobacco prices help to prevent people, particularly youths, from starting to smoke. While it is true that higher taxes lead some smokers to cross state or county lines for lower prices, most of those who continue smoking neither travel out of state nor seek smugglers to buy cigarettes.
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoking is now officially prohibited at Courtyard Apartments at Riverview, a public housing complex on South Fourth Street in Queen Village. Or that's the rule on paper. A ban on smoking on Philadelphia Housing Authority property went into effect Wednesday, but for at least two housing complexes, it was off to a slow start. At Courtyard, property managers were still discussing how the prohibition against smoking would work. They have notified residents about the change, but they have not yet set up a designated zone for smoking outside, as required under the policy.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a week, more than 36,000 Philadelphia public housing residents will be asked to take their cigarettes outside, an unprecedented bid to try to improve the health of some of the city's neediest tenants. Officials wondering about the new smoking ban's potential for success can look to the west. Two years ago, Chester County's housing authority started a strict policy to curb smoking among tenants: No tobacco use anywhere on its properties. It was the first housing agency in Southeastern Pennsylvania to go smoke-free.
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