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Smoking Ban

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NEWS
December 1, 2006 | By Patrick Kerkstra INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Philadelphia City Council tweaked the smoking ban yesterday, widening one loophole for neighborhood bars but closing another that permitted smoking at outdoor cafes and restaurants. If signed by Mayor Street, the bill also would have the odd effect of sending smokers a little holiday gift: re-legalizing smoking in all bars and eateries until Jan. 8, when it is scheduled to take effect. The adjustments have been in the works since June, when Councilman Frank DiCicco helped win the votes needed for the original ban by introducing a companion bill that would make the exemption for neighborhood bars permanent.
NEWS
June 5, 2008 | By Kari Andren and Amy Worden INQUIRER HARRISBURG BUREAU
The state Senate yesterday voted down a long-awaited smoking-ban bill, clouding the future of legislation agreed upon by a bipartisan committee Tuesday. The House, meanwhile, overwhelmingly approved the bill (Senate Bill 246). The votes in the two chambers came one day after the compromise bill banning smoking in most indoor venues and allowing Philadelphia's more comprehensive ban to stand was agreed upon by a joint legislative committee. The Senate rejected the bill, 31-19, behind Democrats who felt other municipalities should be allowed to enact their tougher antismoking ordinances.
NEWS
December 15, 2008
Prison progress Your "Parole: A system failure" editorial (Dec. 6) ignores the state Department of Corrections' progress in fostering a safe prison environment that properly prepares inmates for a law-abiding life upon release. The department continually evaluates its educational, vocational and treatment programs for improvement areas. One such improvement is a comprehensive drug-interdiction policy recognized nationally as a best practice. This policy has helped decrease assaults on staff by inmates by 7.2 percent and the number of drug finds by 12.4 percent.
NEWS
December 20, 2005
MAYOR STREET now blames City Council's failure to pass a much-needed smoking ban on the death of David Cohen, which has made it more difficult to get nine yes votes. What we should really be asking is why the mayor himself has wavered on this issue and refused to get fully behind the ban? He surely knows that a few calls to his close allies on Council would probably ensure the bill's passage. But he also knows that a smoking ban would be another victory for his political rival who sponsored it. Apparently, the mayor cares more about a petty political feud than he does about the health of Philadelphians.
NEWS
April 11, 2008
After much huffing and puffing, the Atlantic City Council has finally moved to ban smoking throughout the resort's 11 casinos, and that's good news for gamblers and casino employees. Council voted 9-0 to approve an ordinance prohibiting smoking on all casino floors when it was introduced this week. After a second reading later this month, it could be signed into law by Mayor Scott Evans. The total ban is long overdue and corrects the mistake Council made a year ago when it approved a partial smoking ban allowing smoking on 25 percent of a casino floor.
NEWS
September 24, 1986 | By Charlie Frush, Inquirer Staff Writer
Public smoking is now prohibited in the municipal buildings in Burlington City after the passage of a resolution by city council last week to comply with state law. "Employees are permitted to smoke in two lounges, both on the second floor of city hall," said city clerk David Vechesky, "and one lounge at the (former) Stacy School," which houses additional city departments. "There is no smoking at all for the general public" in the two buildings, Vechesky said. He said city employees were furnished copies of the resolution and there were no complaints.
NEWS
October 18, 1989 | By Matthew Purdy, Inquirer Washington Bureau
Congressional agreement on his proposal to ban smoking on virtually all domestic airline fights is "a milestone in the effort to protect the health of nonsmokers," Sen. Frank R. Lautenberg (D., N.J.) said yesterday. The agreement, reached by Senate and House negotiators late Monday night, would ban smoking on all flights within the continental United States and any domestic flights lasting less than six hours. The ban would extend to flights to and from the U.S. territories in the Caribbean Sea. In effect, the only U.S. flights on which smoking would be allowed are those to and from Hawaii, Alaska and the U.S. territories in the Pacific Ocean, which last at least six hours.
NEWS
February 27, 1992 | By Sharon O'Neal, SPECIAL TO THE INQUIRER
Employees of the Phoenixville Area School District who smoke will have to adapt to a smoking ban that takes effect June 1. The board agreed at its meeting last week to ban smoking districtwide, which means employees cannot smoke in any of the district's buildings or while they are on official district business outside a building. Athletic coaches, for example, cannot smoke during an outdoor game or practice. Teachers, however, could smoke outside a school building during a break, according to acting Superintendent Dennis Blanton.
NEWS
June 9, 2008
THE STATE smoking-ban legislation smells as bad as the worst ashtray. By not repealing the Philadelphia ban on smoking in bars and casinos, this law guarantees that bar owners, etc., will be soon at each other's throats instead of joining to oppose bans. As smokers flock to out-of-town smoking venues for beers and slots, the in-town proprietors will yell at the unfairness. They will call for a "level playing field. " Legislators will not level the field by dumping the Philly ban - they will call for a "tougher" state law to extend the ban to all bars and casinos.
NEWS
February 10, 2005 | By Bruce Nichols
Four years ago, city restaurant and tavern owners helped block legislation that would have made Philadelphia's eating and drinking establishments smoke-free. Our position was clear: Don't tell us how to run our businesses; we know how to accommodate our patrons. A city-only ban, we believed, would send smokers to our competitors in the suburbs, forcing bars and restaurants to close in Philadelphia. Our workers who enjoyed smoking at work also would be denied that freedom. And secondhand smoke?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 7, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoking is now officially prohibited at Courtyard Apartments at Riverview, a public housing complex on South Fourth Street in Queen Village. Or that's the rule on paper. A ban on smoking on Philadelphia Housing Authority property went into effect Wednesday, but for at least two housing complexes, it was off to a slow start. At Courtyard, property managers were still discussing how the prohibition against smoking would work. They have notified residents about the change, but they have not yet set up a designated zone for smoking outside, as required under the policy.
NEWS
July 30, 2015 | By Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writer
In a week, more than 36,000 Philadelphia public housing residents will be asked to take their cigarettes outside, an unprecedented bid to try to improve the health of some of the city's neediest tenants. Officials wondering about the new smoking ban's potential for success can look to the west. Two years ago, Chester County's housing authority started a strict policy to curb smoking among tenants: No tobacco use anywhere on its properties. It was the first housing agency in Southeastern Pennsylvania to go smoke-free.
NEWS
July 19, 2015 | By Madeline R. Conway, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fred "Bubble" Carter lit a cigarette in his left hand Friday afternoon as he stood on the grounds of the Spring Garden Apartments and savored something that early next month will be against the rules. Carter is a regular smoker, but he recognizes the habit's health risks, so he understands the impetus behind the Philadelphia Housing Authority's ban on smoking in its properties. "I'm not going to say it ain't going to work, but you can't just go into somebody's house and tell them not to smoke," he said.
REAL_ESTATE
February 22, 2015 | By Erin Arvedlund, Inquirer Staff Writer
Where there's smoke, there's ire. High-rise condo buildings such as the Dorchester and Society Hill Towers and luxury buildings such as the St. James are starting to ban resident smoking - even in residents' own units. "There is now a growing trend in condominiums nationwide, and especially in urban high-rises, to impose a total ban on smoking anywhere on the property - common areas, indoor and out, and even in the individual residences and on their balconies and patios," said Gary Krimstock, a lawyer specializing in condo-association law with Fineman Krekstein and Harris in Center City.
NEWS
October 20, 2014 | By Rita Giordano, Inquirer Staff Writer
The signs went up a bit over a week ago on the little stretch that is the Monmouth Street Business District in proudly blue-collar Gloucester City. They took most folks by surprise: The no-smoking symbol and the "100% Smoke Free Public Property" sign. By late last week, the police had yet to issue a ticket, but on sidewalks known for a fair yield of butts, the stubs were few and far between. But if the smokes have been extinguished at least on those few blocks, the furor smolders on. Mayor William James says the ban is part of an effort to clean up and revitalize the three-block commercial strip - an endeavor that has included acquiring three properties with about $540,000 in state and federal funds.
NEWS
April 11, 2014 | By Seth Zweifler, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Mayor Nutter took out his pen Wednesday to sign two bills that crack down on "vaping," or puffing on electronic cigarettes, Gregory Conley broke the silence in the Mayor's Reception Room at City Hall. "Congratulations on hurting public health and deceiving smokers into believing that e-cigarettes are harmful," Conley shouted at the mayor while holding an e-cigarette. As a member of Nutter's security team stood in front of Conley, an e-cigarette lobbyist, the mayor fired back: "That device might be harmful, but he's harmless.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
In a city that has had trouble kicking the smoking habit, any step that promises to tamp down easy access to cigarettes - including a major pharmacy chain's recent decision to give up tobacco products - is a step in the right direction. Unfortunately, Mayor Nutter's proposal to raise a $2-a-pack cigarette tax, which was approved by City Council last year, remains stalled in Harrisburg. Besides the estimated $45 million a year it would pump into the treasury for city schools, the tax would be worth far more from a public-health perspective.
NEWS
October 5, 2013
The owners of Pennsylvania and Atlantic City casinos granted ill-advised exemptions from indoor smoking bans contend that they must look to smokers for a sizable share of the pot - and, thus, the state tax revenues generated by gambling. But what if smoke-filled casinos are triggering a haul of a different kind - of patrons sickened and, in extreme cases, having to be carted off to a hospital? Troubling recent findings from a study of the impact of secondhand smoke in casinos drive home the commonsense notion that smoke-free gambling would be healthier for patrons and employees alike.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century after a U.S. Surgeon General's report raised the alarm on tobacco, most Americans know that smoking may eventually cause lung cancer. Far less appreciated is what can happen just minutes - 60 seconds, according to some research - after taking in a breath of smoke, even secondhand. In the bloodstream, platelets are activated and become sticky. They clump together to form clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke. They stick to artery walls, ripping the lining when blood flow increases and interfering with the vessels' ability to expand and contract as needed.
NEWS
March 26, 2013
DID YOU hear the footsteps last week? Are they coming for you next? The gargantuan CVS drugstore chain has ordered its nearly 200,000 employees to disclose personal health information - weight, height, body fat, blood pressure, cholesterol, blood sugar - or they will have a $600 penalty added to their annual health-insurance bill. CVS public-relations director Michael DeAngelis sees it differently, telling me that employees who take the survey will pay $600 less for health coverage.
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