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Smoking

NEWS
March 22, 1990 | By Kerry Lippincott, Special to The Inquirer
Smoking soon will be prohibited in all school buildings and administrative offices in the Unionville-Chadds Ford School District. At Monday's meeting, the school board unanimously decided to iron out its no-smoking policy in the next few weeks; the policy would be implemented in September. The policy will include penalties for violators, as well as provisions for a program to help those addicted to smoking, said board member Phyllis Witcher, who is a member of the Delaware and Chester County American Lung Association.
NEWS
July 27, 1989 | By Melissa Ramsey, Special to The Inquirer
In a long and emotional meeting, the Upper Merion Area school board on Monday night revised its no-smoking policy and discussed policies concerning drug and alcohol use by students. To receive federal funding, the schools must agree to a no-smoking policy for students, officials said. But the board went further and unanimously approved a no-smoking policy for anyone on school property, effective Sept. 1. Gone are the days when parents and visitors could light up at Viking Field or outside the school auditorium.
NEWS
December 9, 2003
IBELIEVE that the Philadelphia fails to fulfill its duty of prohibiting the sale of tobacco products and alcoholic beverages to minors. It is appalling that a great number of teens and preteens have easy access to such harmful substances. Over the years, I have seen advertisements against smoking, but there are still commercials promoting the consumption of alcohol. Nevertheless, it is easy for the adolescents of today to acquire tobacco products and alcoholic beverages. It disturbs me to see many of my fellow students smoking cigarettes after school or easily purchasing cigarettes at nearby stores adjacent to our school.
NEWS
March 31, 2009
RE CHRISTINE Flowers' March 27 op-ed opposing legalizing drugs: The piece starts with a false construct. No one credible is talking about legalizing all drugs in response to Mexico's drug war or our economic crisis - just marijuana. The op-ed conflates marijuana, which has never killed anyone and is non-addictive, to truly dangerous drugs. Flowers apparently rejects the concept of dealing rationally with a controversial issue, as if wild-eyed hysteria leads to effective solutions.
BUSINESS
January 18, 1989 | Daily News Wire Services
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. attacked the American Medical Association yesterday for publishing a report that its new "smokeless cigarette" could be used to smoke crack, a form of cocaine. "We are appalled that such a widely respected publication as the Journal of the American Medical Association would jeopardize its reputation by promoting distortions to further the political goals of its parent organization," the company, part of RJR Nabisco Inc., said in a letter to the AMA. The Jan. 6 issue of the Journal contained a letter from government researchers who said drug users could modify Reynolds' new "Premier" cigarette by replacing its elements with cocaine, allowing the potent drug to be smoked inconspicuously in public.
NEWS
December 15, 2000 | by Erin Einhorn, Daily News Staff Writer
If at first you don't succeed, form another task force. It's not exactly what City Councilman Michael Nutter and the devoted supporters of his anti-smoking bill wanted. In fact, for the health advocates who talk often of the agony of never being able to enjoy a meal in a restaurant, and who have spent weeks waving signs in Council meetings, it had to feel like an awful blow. But if you don't have the votes, you don't have the votes. And so, for the second time since introducing his bill, Nutter yesterday put off a vote in favor of creating a task force.
NEWS
April 16, 2005
AFTER LISTENING to Mayor Street's recent Saturday talk about gun violence, I think he was wrong to say, "The carry law was designed for rural areas. " The folks in rural Pennsylvania don't need to protect themselves against crackheads like inner-city people do. I doubt there are many crackheads running around the state's cornfields. Joe Moran Sr., Philadelphia Re Philly guns and violence: When will our citizens wake up? Politicians like Mayor Street continue to send up smokescreens so they don't have to deal with the real issues.
SPORTS
July 29, 1987 | By JAY GREENBERG, Daily News Sports Writer
The embers died in May. Now, an intimidating 11 games back and with an impossible four teams to catch, the Phillies stoke the coals, trying to generate not really a drive for a pennant, but one for credibility. They are trying to heat the notion that they are still, despite it all, headed in the right direction. They went to 21-16 under new manager Lee Elia with last night's 5-2 victory over the Pirates, and unquestionably are playing improved baseball. Improved over what, you do not want to remember, but the Phils have been better, nonetheless.
NEWS
March 1, 1990 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
Anyone found smoking on Wallingford-Swarthmore School District property will face a $50 fine under a new get-tough policy announced by the school board. The fines will be used to pay for Smoker Enders or similar anti-smoking classes for student offenders. Board members voted, 6-1, at their Monday business meeting to levy fines on students, staff members or visitors found smoking on any district property. However, only students will be required to attend the anti-smoking classes.
NEWS
April 19, 2005
THANK you, Regina Medina and the Daily News for the insightful article about the difficulties involved with quitting smoking ("Addicted: We know tobacco's dangers, so why do we still smoke?"). Quitting is definitely not easy, but free help is available. Thanks to state funding from the settlement with the tobacco industry, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health is able to offer our residents free quit-smoking programs and nicotine replacement therapy (the nicotine patch and gum)
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