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Smoking

NEWS
April 19, 2005
THANK you, Regina Medina and the Daily News for the insightful article about the difficulties involved with quitting smoking ("Addicted: We know tobacco's dangers, so why do we still smoke?"). Quitting is definitely not easy, but free help is available. Thanks to state funding from the settlement with the tobacco industry, the Philadelphia Department of Public Health is able to offer our residents free quit-smoking programs and nicotine replacement therapy (the nicotine patch and gum)
NEWS
November 17, 1988 | By Lisa Ellis, Inquirer Staff Writer
It's 8 a.m., and your spouse has just been wheeled into the operating room for major surgery. Your nerves are frayed. This will last for hours, and all you have to do is wait. Automatically, you reach for help. You reach into that little paper packet, light up and inhale deeply. Six months from now, anxious visitors will have to play out that scene differently at four hospitals that serve the Northeast. Before they take a puff, they'll have to take a walk. A long walk.
NEWS
February 24, 1988 | New York Daily News
A Long Island woman who smokes "to annoy" her husband - was ordered by a judge yesterday to refrain from lighting up in front of him or their three children, and to confine her habit to one room. The order by acting Nassau Supreme Court Justice Ralph Diamond is the latest chapter in a divorce battle between Elizabeth Roofeh, 41, and her husband, Jahanshah, a non-smoking orthopedic surgeon. Elizabeth Roofeh, who can be held in contempt if she disobeys the order, was "outraged, and will appeal the decision," her lawyer, Joel Brandes, said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2010 | By NOELLE CARTER, Los Angeles Times
CLOSE YOUR EYES and conjure up the thought of slow-smoking ribs. Memphis-style baby backs, the meat fall-off-the-bone tender, a simple dry rub tantalizingly complicated with deep hickory notes, the flavors drawn out with a tart vinegar-Dijon mop. There's a primal wonder to smoked food - that such depth of flavor can come from so simple a technique. And then, of course, there's the lure of the sunny afternoon spent in a lawn chair with a cold beer while you patiently wait for the Weber to work its magic.
NEWS
November 20, 1988 | By Sergio R. Bustos, Inquirer Staff Writer
No smoking in school may no longer apply only to students of the Kennett Consolidated School District. The school board on Monday introduced a change in personnel policy that would prohibit administrators, teachers and other employees from smoking on school property. The change would extend to employees using district-owned vehicles. The change in policy could be approved as early as next month's school board meeting, which will be at 8 p.m. Dec. 5 in district offices on East Mulberry Street in Kennett Square.
NEWS
February 24, 2004 | By JUDY SHEPPS BATTLE
QUESTION: When is the illegal advertising and promoting of tobacco products to minors not considered illegal? Answer: When such enticement is woven into the theme of a prime-time TV program. It has been less than six years since a coalition of attorney generals from 46 states successfully settled their cases with five major tobacco companies, and the industry agreed not to "take any action, directly or indirectly, to target youth . . . in the advertising, promotion or marketing of tobacco products.
NEWS
July 26, 1995
Black helicopters are circling Michigan waiting to enforce a takeover by the United Nations. Tiny microchips are implanted in newborn babies to facilitate totalitarian mind control. There apparently are thousands of takers for these and other weird conspiracy theories. So why are Americans unwilling to see the conspiracy concocted by the tobacco industry? Q. What did the tobacco industry know and when did it know it? A. Plenty, at least 30 years ago. As far back as 1963, tobacco companies knew nicotine is addictive.
NEWS
December 17, 1987 | By Mike Franolich, Special to The Inquirer
Fire officials blame the cigarette that a disabled Willingboro woman was smoking for a fire that caused her death yesterday as she sat in a reclining chair in her home. The woman, Berta James, 58, was pronounced dead at her house on Enfield Lane in Willingboro's Garfield East section by a county medical examiner. "It looks like she never got out of the chair," Burlington County Fire Marshal Evan Kline said yesterday. The fire in the wood-frame, detached single-family home began at 11:30 a.m. and lasted only a short while before it was contained by three Willingboro fire companies, Kline said.
NEWS
May 25, 1993 | By Tia Swanson, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
It looks like the township will not be banning cigarette sales to the under-18 set anytime soon. An hour before the Township Council was set to vote on a proposal that would have set stiff fines for people and stores that sold cigarettes to minors, members learned there was a compelling reason to just say no to the plan: a costly lawsuit. That's what the State of New Jersey leveled against the municipal government in East Brunswick when the town passed a similar law that banned all cigarette machines from the town, said Cherry Hill Mayor Susan Bass Levin.
SPORTS
June 3, 1993 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
Major league baseball has announced a sweeping ban of all tobacco products by all minor league personnel effective June 15. No cigarettes or any smokeless tobacco products will be allowed on the field, in the dugout or the clubhouse or on team transportation. At least partly because the ban doesn't extend to major leaguers, there was an immediate and predictable howl of protest from the younger players. "It's a violation of our rights," Scranton/Wilkes-Barre outfielder Tony Longmire, a smoker, told The Scranton Times before the Red Barons game against Columbus.
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