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NEWS
January 11, 2014
A half-century after the historic U.S. surgeon general's finding that smoking sickens and kills, the Philadelphia region could be viewed as one of the nation's key battlegrounds in the continuing struggle to stem the health scourge, which leads to 443,000 deaths a year and costs billions of dollars in medical care and lost productivity. Despite the remarkable success in reducing national smoking rates by more than half - to 18 percent - Philadelphia stands out as having the highest rate of adult smoking, around 25 percent, among the country's 10 largest cities, according to the Pennsylvania Medical Society.
NEWS
December 29, 2013 | By Lisa Tom, For The Inquirer
Fred Contino has been smoking since he was 13. He is, at 53, trying to quit. He has replaced his Marlboro Reds with a small, white plastic tube - his new prescription nicotine inhaler. "It's going to take time," he says. "When I want a cigarette, I try and take puffs on it. That takes away the craving for a little bit, but the cravings are still there. " Contino is one of about 44 million cigarette smokers in the United States, 19 percent of all adults, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
REAL_ESTATE
October 27, 2013 | By Alison Burdo, Inquirer Staff Writer
Smoking even in one's own home may someday be a thing of the past, as more real estate developers and landlords in the Philadelphia region are embracing the trend toward healthy housing. The 86-unit South Star Lofts at 521 S. Broad St. will prohibit smoking when it opens in early 2014, said Marianne Harris, director of marketing for the owner, Dranoff Properties. Tenants there will pay about $1,600 monthly for a studio and as much as $2,600 for a two-bedroom apartment, Harris said.
NEWS
October 15, 2013
No smoking here With regard to the push to ban smoking in casinos, there is little to no chance of current proposals becoming law ("A risk casinos can do without," Oct. 4). Instead, legislators and public-health advocates should consider smoke-free electronic cigarettes as a solution. According to a study funded by the National Institutes of Health, e-cigarette vapor contains fewer toxicants than secondhand smoke. Data like this led Drexel University professor Igor Burstyn to conclude in a recent, comprehensive review that the vapor poses no threat.
SPORTS
October 8, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
EAST RUTHERFORD N.J. - Two things that felt inevitable finally happened yesterday at MetLife Stadium. First, the Eagles won a football game, which the NFL's second-ranked offense just about had to get around to doing again sooner or later. For now we won't quibble with the fact that Eli Manning had to throw three fourth-quarter interceptions to seal the outcome. And second, 33-year-old Michael Vick watched the second half of the Eagles' 36-21 victory over the host New York Giants from the sideline, wearing a baseball cap, after grabbing his left hamstring at the end of a 13-yard run to the New York sideline with 4:31 left in the second quarter.
REAL_ESTATE
September 30, 2013 | By Alan J. Heavens, Inquirer Real Estate Writer
The American Society of Home Inspectors contacted me with its concerns regarding ionization smoke detection. According to the National Fire Protection Association, ionization alarms have a small amount of radioactive material between two electrically charged plates that ionizes the air and causes current to flow between the plates. When smoke enters a chamber, it disrupts the flow of ions, reducing the flow of current, activating the alarm. Though such alarms respond best to "flaming fires," the group says, photoelectric smoke detection is more responsive to fires that begin with smoldering.
NEWS
September 29, 2013 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
NUMEROUS Philly firefighters were in the unusual position yesterday of having to douse furious flames at their own building. An ambulance inexplicably caught fire inside the headquarters for Ladder 2, at 4th and Arch streets, shortly after 11:30 a.m., filling the Old City firehouse with a blanket of black smoke. "It's not something that you see often," said Fire Commissioner Lloyd Ayers. Two medics called for help after trying unsuccessfully to put out the fire, which appeared to have started in the engine, with an extinguisher, Ayers said.
NEWS
September 21, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin and Michaelle Bond, Inquirer Staff Writers
Larry Dennis started smoking at 16, usually Newports, and he didn't quit until March. "I stopped because I knew we couldn't smoke no more in here," Dennis, 57, said Thursday afternoon outside the Church Street towers in West Chester, where he lives in public housing. "I wanted to anyway. It was better for me. " The Housing Authority of Chester County is the first in Southeastern Pennsylvania and South Jersey to go smoke-free, although the Philadelphia Housing Authority hopes to test a policy at four pilot sites within a year.
NEWS
September 16, 2013 | By Don Sapatkin, Inquirer Staff Writer
A half-century after a U.S. Surgeon General's report raised the alarm on tobacco, most Americans know that smoking may eventually cause lung cancer. Far less appreciated is what can happen just minutes - 60 seconds, according to some research - after taking in a breath of smoke, even secondhand. In the bloodstream, platelets are activated and become sticky. They clump together to form clots that can cause a heart attack or stroke. They stick to artery walls, ripping the lining when blood flow increases and interfering with the vessels' ability to expand and contract as needed.
SPORTS
September 4, 2013 | BY LES BOWEN, Daily News Staff Writer bowenl@phillynews.com
AT SOME POINT during the long weekend in which we didn't publish a newspaper, you probably heard and read pretty much all you cared to hear or read about Danny Watkins. But teams don't give up on first-round draft picks after 2 years very often; the Eagles hadn't done that since they acknowledged their terrible error in the 1997 drafting of defensive end Jon Harris. So some sort of postmortem is required for the departure of the man who epitomizes the futility of the Eagles' 2011 draft, and underlines the personnel mistakes that paved Andy Reid's road to Kansas City.
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