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BUSINESS
March 24, 1986 | By GARY THOMPSON, Daily News Staff Writer
The city's plan to convert the old Midvale-Heppenstall Steel Co. plant into a 74-acre industrial park has hit a serious snag, City Commerce Director David Brenner said yesterday. Brenner said negotiations with Park Corp., owner of the abandoned plant, are at a standstill. Park Corp. called off the talks, Brenner said, when issues related to the demolition of buildings on the site could not be resolved. The city has attempted to revive the negotiations in recent weeks, he said, but without success.
SPORTS
September 16, 1995 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
Any proposal to build a baseball stadium at the Meadowlands sports complex would be fraught with difficulties, the New Jersey Sports and Exposition Authority said yesterday. With 80,000 Giants or Jets fans packing Giants Stadium on Sundays in September, a baseball home game would create a traffic nightmare with another 50,000 fans trying to squeeze into the complex. Horse races at the Meadowlands might interfere with parking for night baseball games, and baseball might drive bettors and their money away.
SPORTS
September 14, 2011 | DAILY NEWS WIRE REPORTS
THE START of the NBA season was thrown into doubt yesterday after players and owners remained divided over the salary-cap structure at a key labor meeting. Tentative plans to talk again today were scrapped, and no further sessions were scheduled. Union executive director Billy Hunter said players were prepared to make a "significant" financial move, but found owners unwilling to budge off their positions. Commissioner David Stern and deputy commissioner Adam Silver countered that the union insisted the current cap remain exactly as is before they would agree to any further discussions.
SPORTS
April 7, 2001 | by Paul Hagen Daily News Sports Writer
A senior Major League Baseball executive has rebutted the claim by an unnamed NFL source that the Phillies are blocking the Eagles from playing a "Monday Night Football" game at Veterans Stadium on Sept. 24. "The Phillies aren't doing anything," Katy Feeney, vice president for scheduling and club relations said yesterday, responding to a story in the Daily News. "The NFL called and asked us to help them out. They asked if [MLB] could look at releasing that date. But by all the rules, that's a baseball date, and it would be very difficult for us to just give it away.
SPORTS
June 9, 1994 | by Paul Hagen, Daily News Sports Writer
According to an Associated Press report out of Baltimore yesterday, a deal that would send unhappy Orioles third baseman Chris Sabo to the Phillies for righthander Paul Quantrill is hung up on the Phillies' insistence that Baltimore pick up part of Sabo's $2 million salary. Phillies sources made two points about the rumor yesterday. One is an insistence that Quantrill's name never has come up in talks between the teams. The other is that since Sabo has demanded a trade and has been hurt, the Orioles must expect to pick up part of the tab if they want to deal the disgruntled player.
NEWS
December 3, 1989 | By CALVIN TRILLIN
While A. was home from college, she happened to mention a conversation she'd had with this snag who sits behind her in history class. I had to call time-out for a translation. Even though I was wearing a new sweater that I thought made me look rather collegiate, or at least professorial, I didn't know what A. meant by snag. "Hold it," I said. I opened the dictionary - when A. is home from college, I always keep a dictionary close at hand, for just this sort of thing - and looked up snag.
NEWS
April 22, 1993 | By C.R. Harper, INQUIRER CORRESPONDENT
Two two-year-old park improvement projects that depend on government grants have stalled, but a recent volunteer effort has helped jump-start repairs to another neighborhood park. Improvements to Garchinsky Park and Penn Street Park, which were to be funded by a $13,000 Community Development Block Grant, hit a snag when the lowest bid for the proposed work came in last month at $25,000, said Gregory C. Lebold, who represented Borough Engineer James C. Kelly at a Borough Council meeting Monday night.
NEWS
November 13, 1987 | New York Daily News
The first person caught in New York City's sweep of the homeless mentally ill was pronounced "fit" and ordered released yesterday, but the order was blocked pending an appeal by the city. Joyce Brown, also known as Billie Boggs, was returned to the Bellevue Hospital psychiatric ward last night. She was picked up from a sidewalk on Second Avenue and 65th Street and taken to Bellevue Oct. 28. She was ordered freed by acting Supreme Court Justice Robert Lippmann, who presided over her commitment hearing last week.
NEWS
July 5, 1988 | By RAMONA SMITH, Daily News Staff Writer
Blimps are supposed to be slow, but this is ridiculous. With the summer season fully under way, beachcombers have yet to see any trace of the blimp that eventually may help guard the Jersey shoreline from pollution. The chubby airship has been grounded in the New Jersey Legislature. When the idea was floated earlier this year, the plan was for the state to rent a 190-foot-long blimp for three months - starting Memorial Day - and fit it with special infrared cameras at a cost of about $1.5 million.
SPORTS
December 5, 1988 | By Peter Pascarelli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Negotiations to keep Mike Schmidt in Philadelphia hit a snag last night shortly after the Phillies issued a news release saying that the free-agent third baseman had signed a one-year contract. But both sides said an agreement that would extend Schmidt's 16-year Phillies career could be reached soon. According to Phils president Bill Giles, the hang-up involved contract language regarding the Phillies' financial obligations to Schmidt should he suffer an injury unrelated to the problem in his right shoulder that sidelined him late last season.
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ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
June 21, 2016 | By Jeremy Roebuck, STAFF WRITER
The dismissal last week of a juror in U.S. Rep. Chaka Fattah's federal corruption trial came after the panel told a federal judge it had hit a snag just hours into its deliberations, according to an audio recording obtained by the Inquirer. The exact contents of the jury's note Thursday to U.S. District Judge Harvey Bartle III remain undisclosed. But in a sidebar conversation with the judge that afternoon, lawyers in the case referred to trouble in the jury room, and discussed whether the panel should be read the instructions typically given to jurors who report that they are deadlocked.
NEWS
May 27, 2016 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, STAFF WRITER
A Philadelphia man wanted for violating parole on a bank robbery conviction was arrested during a click-it-or-ticket seat belt stop at the Shore, police said Wednesday. The fugitive, Joseph Piston, 36, was a passenger in a car that North Wildwood Police Officer Bryan Skill stopped Tuesday afternoon at 20th and New York Avenues, police said. Neither Piston, nor the driver, Harry McCook, 44, of Philadelphia was wearing a seat belt, police said. Besides the parole violation warrant out of Pennsylvania, Piston has outstanding warrants from North Wildwood, Somers Point, Wildwood Crest and Union Township, N.J., police said.
NEWS
April 27, 2016 | By Andrew Seidman, TRENTON BUREAU
TRENTON - A three-judge appeals panel on Monday delivered a setback to a state election watchdog's efforts to pursue campaign-finance violations against a North Jersey Democratic power broker accused of misusing thousands of dollars. The Election Law Enforcement Commission had filed a complaint alleging that Essex County Executive Joe DiVincenzo used funds raised during his 2010 campaign for such things as a gym membership, paying a parking ticket, a television, and a trip to Puerto Rico.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2016 | By Jason Laughlin, Staff Writer
An effort to give the Delaware River Port Authority's chief executive a five-figure raise hit a speed bump Wednesday because of a procedural mix-up. Still, the proposal sparked anger that the authority's board tried to give CEO John Hanson a $39,474 pay increase while 66 percent of the authority's personnel have gone without a raise for four years. "I'm here to make sure it's a front-burner issue and it stays a front-burner issue with you," said Bill Hosey of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers 351, which represents about 20 information-services workers.
BUSINESS
November 26, 2015 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
The biotech industry convention that brought nearly 16,000 biotech professionals to Philadelphia in June will be back in 2019 - a major business win for the city's hospitality industry and the Pennsylvania Convention Center. The Biotechnology Industry Organization's BIO International convention is expected to fill more than 27,000 total hotel-room nights and generate more than $41 million for the region upon its return. "My experience was nothing but positive," said Scott Whitaker, BIO convention president, describing BIO's show in June.
NEWS
September 28, 2015 | By David O'Reilly, Inquirer Staff Writer
Journalists in the Vatican press corps accompanying Pope Francis on his U.S. trip were very impressed with Philadelphia's architecture and street-fair feel when they first arrived. But as the day wore on, many of the media representatives became increasingly soured by the heavy security measures evident throughout the city. As we got off the bus to enter Independence Mall for Francis' address, we were all struck by the line of police cars and security vehicles flanking Sixth Street from Market to Independence Hall.
NEWS
May 1, 2015
D AILY NEWS editorial cartoonist Signe Wilkinson has added two big accolades to her collection. Yesterday Wilkinson was named grand-prize winner of the 15th World Press Freedom International Editorial Cartoon Competition of cartoonists' responses to the terrorist attack on the Paris-based magazine Charlie Hebdo in January. The competition attracted 300 cartoons from 43 nations. And last night, the Overseas Press Club of America, at its 76th annual awards ceremony in New York, gave Wilkinson its Thomas Nast Award for international cartooning - an award she won twice before, in 1996 and 2007.
NEWS
November 8, 2014 | By Marc Narducci, Inquirer Columnist
It's often been said that defense wins championships, and while Timber Creek is solid on that side of the ball, good luck in stopping the Chargers' offense. The South Jersey Group 4 field will now have the unenviable task of attempting to slow this explosive attack. Timber Creek earned the No. 1 seed in the sectional with Friday night's 44-17 win over visiting Hammonton. The Chargers, ranked No. 3 in South Jersey by The Inquirer, moved to 8-0. They also earned the title in the West Jersey Football League National Division, one of the deepest divisions in South Jersey.
NEWS
October 9, 2014 | By Paul Nussbaum, Inquirer Staff Writer
A proposed $1.6 billion light-rail line between Glassboro and Camden has hit a significant roadblock: The Federal Transit Administration will not proceed with a required environmental study because the planned rail line has no owner or operator. Without a completed environmental study, the 18-mile line cannot be built. "Unfortunately, because you have not identified a project sponsor who can accept the responsibility for commitments in the environmental impact statement, and ultimately operate and construct the project, we cannot move ahead with the environmental document," the FTA's regional administrator in Philadelphia, Brigid Hynes-Cherin, wrote to John Hanson, chief executive of the Delaware River Port Authority.
BUSINESS
October 3, 2014 | By Linda Loyd, Inquirer Staff Writer
Getting through U.S. Customs checkpoints can be irritating at peak travel times, but some passengers arriving at Philadelphia International Airport got an extra dose of angst this week. New automated passport kiosks, designed to expedite the entry process, had a technology glitch. They didn't work for a while Tuesday afternoon and had to be rebooted at a busy time, when many US Airways and American Airlines flights were arriving from Europe. Travelers who had just spent from seven to nine hours in the air became frustrated, and anger boiled up because many had connecting flights.
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