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Snails

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NEWS
April 6, 1988 | BY DAVE BARRY
We here at the Consumer Command Post have good news for those of you who wish to freeze your heads, but first we have this Emergency Safety Advisory: If you must eat snails, always wear safety goggles! This advisory results from a recent unfortunate consumer tragedy that was brought to our attention by an extremely alert reader named Marie Sindoni, who sent us an Associated Press article from The Schenectady (N.Y.) Gazette headlined: SNAIL EXPLODES IN RESTAURANT, BLINDING WOMAN The article states that a 36-year-old woman "was celebrating her birthday Friday night when she was burned and temporarily blinded by a snail that exploded on her plate at a Syracuse restaurant, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2007 | By SONO MOTOYAMA For the Daily News
Ah, France. the land of cultural enlightenment and sophistication, the birthplace of Diderot and Voltaire, home to haute cuisine and haute couture. Where the inhabitants are known for their social formality and chilling snobbery. When I moved here last year from South Philly, I thought I might learn to distinguish between chenin blanc and sauvignon blanc, discover a fabulous recipe for gateau au chocolat, maybe even read Proust en francais. Then at the end of July my husband took me to a cargolade - a snail barbecue - at the self-proclaimed Snail Capital of the World, where a reported 160,000 snails were consumed.
LIVING
March 11, 1996 | By Sandy Bauers, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The cargo was U.S. missiles that had been in Spain, and federal officials held it up at the port of entry, McGuire Air Force Base. They were concerned about the danger, though not from the weapons, which had been disarmed. Inspectors had found a number of quarter-inch brown and white snails attached to the underside of the missiles, and they couldn't identify them. What if the inspectors, who worked for the U.S. Department of Agriculture, let the snails into the United States, and the creatures started multiplying and wolfing down a valuable crop?
NEWS
October 19, 1997 | By Maria Gallagher, FOR THE INQUIRER
Twice a year, in May and in November, a charter bus carrying three dozen American chefs-to-be rumbles up the driveway to Jean-Francois Vadot's snail farm in Burgundy, about 150 miles southeast of Paris. Tour buses are a rarity here. One that stops is rarer still. Most tourists breeze right through Blancey without even realizing it. The village consists of a couple of houses, a couple of barns, a herd of Charolais cattle, some rabbits - and about 80,000 snails. Those escargots, which Vadot cultivates for the restaurant trade, are what the aspiring chefs come to see. The trips are part of the core curriculum for students at the Restaurant School, a culinary school in Philadelphia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Jason Wilson
DOES ANY foodstuff carry as much baggage for Americans as escargot or foie gras? When it comes to escargot, it can be hard to move beyond the old pop-cultural image of snail as "snob food. " Plus, for many newbies, there's a primal, knee-jerk repulsion to the animal itself or to the presentation that, when done badly, can look like boogers. And when it come to foie gras — the third rail of the food world — it's difficult to steer any discussion of fatty duck or goose liver away from the ethical or political and back toward the culinary.
NEWS
April 20, 1995 | By Thomas J. Brady, with reports from Inquirer wire services
BREAKOUT ARTISTS EATING UP THE COUNTRYSIDE A snail bred to tempt the Asian palate has instead developed a taste of its own - for Vietnamese rice. Escaping escargots are chomping through the country's rice paddies at considerably faster than a snail's pace, ravaging the crop that feeds Vietnam's 72 million people and is its second-biggest export. South American golden snails were brought to Vietnam six years ago, despite warnings by scientists about what would happen if they escaped their breeding grounds.
NEWS
March 27, 1989 | By Ron Avery, Daily News Staff Writer
Philadelphia, a city famous for so many things: historic shrines, cheesesteaks, Mummers, malacology. What New Orleans is to jazz players, Philadelphia is to malacologists - scientists who study mollusks, such as snails and clams. The Mecca of malacology that draws the shell scientists can be found in row after row of high cabinets on the fourth floor of the Academy of Natural Sciences. It's the oldest shell collection in the Western Hemisphere, the second-largest in the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fish want to fly, birds want to swim, and snails apparently want to go fast. At least the exuberant title character (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) in Turbo does. In this hackneyed 3-D animated film, Turbo spends his days toiling with the other snails in the garden and his nights raptly watching the Speed Channel, fantasizing about being a race car driver. Or rather, because of his anatomy - a calcium chassis and lack of limbs - he dreams of being the race car. Well, what do you know?
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ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 2013 | Reprinted from Wednesday's editions. By David Hiltbrand, Inquirer Staff Writer
Fish want to fly, birds want to swim, and snails apparently want to go fast. At least the exuberant title character (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) in Turbo does. In this hackneyed 3-D animated film, Turbo spends his days toiling with the other snails in the garden and his nights raptly watching the Speed Channel, fantasizing about being a race car driver. Or rather, because of his anatomy - a calcium chassis and lack of limbs - he dreams of being the race car. Well, what do you know?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2012 | Jason Wilson
DOES ANY foodstuff carry as much baggage for Americans as escargot or foie gras? When it comes to escargot, it can be hard to move beyond the old pop-cultural image of snail as "snob food. " Plus, for many newbies, there's a primal, knee-jerk repulsion to the animal itself or to the presentation that, when done badly, can look like boogers. And when it come to foie gras — the third rail of the food world — it's difficult to steer any discussion of fatty duck or goose liver away from the ethical or political and back toward the culinary.
NEWS
April 15, 2012 | including Zoo Ah-Choooo (Holiday House) Peter Mandel?is an author of children’s books
Everyone arriving back from abroad must fill in a Customs Declaration Form. Whether you're traveling with immediate family members or not, you'd better fill out at least three or four extra copies since these annoyingly oversize, hard-to-fold cards tend to get crumpled and lost when Customs officials start barking, "Get in line!" "Turn off your cell phone!" "Open that passport to the photo page!" Here's a look at what you can expect: 1. Print your family name. Print your given name.
NEWS
November 19, 2010 | By Inga Saffron, Inquirer Architecture Critic
It's not every client who can get the celebrated architect Frank O. Gehry to show up at the groundbreaking for a loading dock. But when the Philadelphia Museum of Art assembled a crowd last week to cheer the start of its modest improvement, there was the snowy-haired, 81-year-old designer, gamely hoisting a shovel and doing his bit to advance a more glamorous project that seems - to outsiders anyway - to be moving according to geologic time. Gehry's star turn was the first time he has shown his face to the general public here since the museum hired him to design a major addition in 2006 - a full four years ago. In the typical course of such things, the signing of big-name talent would be followed, after a year or two, by the public release of architectural renderings.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2007 | By SONO MOTOYAMA For the Daily News
Ah, France. the land of cultural enlightenment and sophistication, the birthplace of Diderot and Voltaire, home to haute cuisine and haute couture. Where the inhabitants are known for their social formality and chilling snobbery. When I moved here last year from South Philly, I thought I might learn to distinguish between chenin blanc and sauvignon blanc, discover a fabulous recipe for gateau au chocolat, maybe even read Proust en francais. Then at the end of July my husband took me to a cargolade - a snail barbecue - at the self-proclaimed Snail Capital of the World, where a reported 160,000 snails were consumed.
NEWS
September 7, 2006 | By Nancy Viau
Charming antique shops, coffee houses, and gift stores border Main Street in Mullica Hill. I bet I can name each one . . . in order . . . from South to North. I've memorized their locations because I have plenty of time to do so while inching my way through town in bumper-to-bumper traffic. If the situation gets much worse, soon I'll be tempted to pull out a good book. At almost any hour of the day or early evening, the stream of cars, vans and tractor-trailers that creep off and on Route 322 by way of Route 45 (Main Street)
NEWS
February 26, 2006 | By Art Carey INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
And now for today?s shocker: Men and women are different. Men are from Mars, women are from Venus, you may have heard. Men are hard, women are soft. Men are stoic and aggressive, women are tender and sensitive. In the realm of love and sex, men are fast, women are slow. Men fall in love with their eyes; women fall in love with their ears. Men give love to get sex; women give sex to get love. At least that?s the conventional wisdom. But is it true? Are women really wired differently?
NEWS
May 27, 2004
THE EYES of the world, literally, are on Philadelphia and its "School of the Future" project with Microsoft. For better and for worse. Check out the Microsoft Web site (www.Microsoft.com) and see for yourself: Questions from all over the world. International conferences. Pleas from other locales for Microsoft to test out educational technologies in their district. This is a very big deal, and a very big test - but not just for the school district, or Microsoft. The school project is a test for the Fairmount Park Commission.
NEWS
March 13, 2003
Daily on CNN, high-ranking Defense Department spokesmen brag about America's military might. Yet today, on Capitol Hill, Congress is likely to hear testimony that woodpeckers and dolphins are impeding military readiness. What's up with that? A larger agenda is playing out in Washington, one that wouldn't necessarily protect soldiers but would surely endanger public health. Under the guise of preparation for war, the Pentagon is seeking broad exemptions from environmental laws that regulate air pollution, hazardous waste and toxic cleanup and that protect endangered species, migratory birds and marine mammals.
NEWS
December 5, 2000
Question: There does seem to be an attitude among many in the tech community that the creation of a New Economy makes the old politics obsolete. Answer: Do people really believe that?. . . When I look at people who say politics isn't relevant because other things are going to move faster, I say, "Well, wait a minute - the last time I checked, it was government that got us The Family and Medical Leave Act. " Within the software industry, people would go crazy if we didn't have family and medical leave ... Instead of just letting politics continue to lose relevance because it moves so slowly, let's figure out how to help change that process.
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