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Sniper

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 14, 2010
8 tonight HISTORY Two-hour special provides unprecedented insights into one of military warfare's most specialized jobs, highly accurate shooting under often-extreme stress. Snipers talk about their previously classified missions.
NEWS
November 10, 2009 | Inquirer wire services
The U.S. Supreme Court refused without comment yesterday to block today's scheduled execution of sniper mastermind John Allen Muhammad. Muhammad is scheduled to die by injection at a Virginia prison for the 2002 slaying of Dean Harold Meyers at a gas station during a three-week rampage across Maryland, Virginia, and Washington. Muhammad and his teenage accomplice, Lee Boyd Malvo, were also suspected of fatal shootings in other states. Malvo is serving a life sentence. The Supreme Court rejected Muhammad's appeal without dissent, though Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and Sonia Sotomayor issued a statement criticizing the court's procedures for handling stay applications in death-penalty cases.
NEWS
September 2, 1999 | by Gloria Campisi, Daily News Staff Writer
It is an eerie and frightening thought. From her porch on Date Street, Eleanor Wilson can see across the street to the small rancher where alleged sniper-killer Donald Traub lived until recent months. Traub, 23, apparently was living with his father at the rancher in Warminster when Wilson's grown, married daughter, Donna Holbrook, was set upon and nearly killed by a sniper on her way to work Aug. 19, 1998. Wilson never knew the Traubs were there. Tuesday, Traub shot Karen Hordis to death outside a Warminster supermarket, police said.
NEWS
November 19, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
By his own admission, Bob Meyers is not an emotional man, and he was not bothered Monday when John Allen Muhammad didn't flinch after a Virginia jury found him guilty of killing Meyers' brother during last year's sniper shootings in the Washington area. What was more troubling, Meyers said, was that Muhammad had worn the same impassive look throughout the trial, even when prosecution witnesses described, in detail, the damage the sniper's bullet had done to Dean Meyers' head. "It just kind of done me wrong," Meyers, of Perkiomenville, said.
NEWS
January 18, 1996 | by Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
Common Pleas Judge James A. Lineberger called the killing by a highway sniper one of the most pointless crimes he'd ever seen. That's because the killer didn't know his victim, and began shooting at a car to try to prove to his friends that he was a tough guy, said Assistant District Attorney Paul Riley yesterday. Before convicting Andre Mason, 22, of Divinity Place near Greenway Avenue, of third-degree murder, Lineberger shook his head in disbelief when he listened to Homicide Detective Eugene Wyatt read Mason's confession to the killing of Kasheen Easley, 17, of Titan Street near 5th, on Feb. 19, 1994.
NEWS
January 29, 1993 | by Gary Thompson, Daily News Movie Critic
"Sniper" is one of those unfortunate studio DOAs that no amount of post- production trauma work can save. The evidence of emergency surgery is everywhere - drastic editing, explanatory voiceovers and a reworked ending that miraculously restores life to a character clearly killed moments before. Despite these measures, "Sniper" is a tremendously dull crawl through the jungle, a complete waste of nifty flying-bullet special effects as well as an intriguing premise. "Sniper" appears to have been conceived as a commentary on the new role of the U.S. military - the hardware and muscle for international political engineering, the assassins who rid the world of troublesome despots.
NEWS
November 4, 2003
IT AMAZES me how two snipers, who gunned down so many innocent people, have the guts to demand a fair trial, even going so far as declaring their innocence. I listen in amazement to the defense lawyers trying to justify the actions of these two vicious killers. There is no defense. They shot a man who was pumping gas, plus young children and elderly people. The end is inevitable. Their sentence will be death or life imprisonment without parole. Everyone, of course, has recourse to a trial before a jury, but in this case it's a waste of time and money.
NEWS
June 14, 1990 | By Dave Racher, Daily News Staff Writer
On the back of his T-shirt was a picture of a clenched fist. Above it were the words: "Iron Fist Club. Mess with the best, die like the rest. " James Paluch, 19, who admitted he shot and killed a woman he didn't know and wounded another stranger with a rifle from the window of his Spring Garden Street apartment in April, wore the shirt as he stood before a judge yesterday. The man accused of being the Spring Garden Street sniper was held for trial on murder and other charges after a preliminary hearing before Municipal Judge Arthur S. Kafrissen.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2001 | by Gary Thompson Daily News Movie Critic
The war-ravaged Stalingrad of 1943 had its own version of Alvin York, the backwoods sharpshooter who became a folk hero in World War I for bagging Germans like turkeys. York's Russian counterpart was Vassili Zaitsev, an illiterate shepherd who grew up shooting wolves to save livestock and found himself in Stalingrad, shooting Nazis to save Russia. His story is told in "Enemy at the Gates," an expensively mounted re-creation of the battle of Stalingrad, backdrop to Zaitsev's fabled accomplishments as a sniper who crept through the rubble of the cratered city to kill dozens of German officers.
NEWS
October 15, 2002 | By Chris Gray INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
"One Shot, One Kill" is known as the unofficial motto of the professional law-enforcement sniper. It's a phrase that testifies to the skill and accuracy needed for extreme situations. But increasingly, the phrase has been co-opted by a group of amateur gun owners who share an avid interest in sniping. These sniper enthusiasts look on their activities as a hobby. They pass around tips, learn techniques through Web sites and videos, and attend training camps to hone their skills.
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SPORTS
April 14, 2015 | By Sam Carchidi, Inquirer Staff Writer
So what went wrong this season and where do the Flyers go from here? The first part of the question is the easiest to answer: The Flyers didn't get enough secondary scoring, struggled mightily in close games, and couldn't find a way to win on the road. That's the abbreviated version on why the Flyers finished 33-31-18, missed the playoffs for the second time in three seasons, and wasted career years by right winger Jake Voracek (81 points) and goalie Steve Mason (.928 save percentage)
NEWS
February 20, 2015
TWO MONTHS ago, picking Oscar winners looked easy - as easy as it looked last year, when I correctly picked the winners of the major categories. (Of course, so did nearly everybody else, but let's not dwell on that.) Since then, a couple of things happened, including "American Sniper. " The movie won a bunch of nominations, and became a box-office and cultural phenomenon, precisely the kind of movie the Oscars were trying to embrace when the Academy expanded the number of Best Picture nominees.
NEWS
February 6, 2015 | BY CLAY FITCH
LAST MONTH the movie "American Sniper" opened nationwide with a record box office of $90 million, shattering previous box-office records for January releases. Since its release some controversy has surrounded the movie, and much of the coverage of the movie lately has been related to these controversies. What is lost in this coverage, and much of the discussion of the movie, is the very real depiction of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's struggles with transitioning to civilian life. "American Sniper" portrays Kyle not only during his four tours in Iraq but also in his struggle to return home to a wife, and later a family, that does not fully understand what he has experienced.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
CONSERVATIVES have a new favorite movie critic and it isn't Michael Medved . It's Michelle Obama . The first lady is a fan of "American Sniper" - and in the same week she refused to cover her head in Saudi Arabia. Maybe the wrong first lady is going to run for president. The Washington Post reported that FLOTUS watched "Sniper" on the Air Force One flight back from the Saudis and praised the movie at a veterans-focused event Friday. She called it "complex," "emotional" and a realistic "depiction of a veteran and his family," in remarks at a gathering that included star (and former Daily News intern)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 27, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
MOVIES become smashes for a lot of reasons. Movies about heroes have been hits, as have movies about anti-heroes. Religious films have made millions, as have films about the devil. Sometimes people go see a movie simply because Gary Thompson gives it an A. But even when there's a megahit, it's likely that 250 million Americans didn't pay to see it. People, however, are paying to see "American Sniper. " The drama, starring former Daily News intern Bradley Cooper as Navy SEAL Chris Kyle , topped the box office for a second weekend with a whopping $64.4 million, per studio estimates.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 20, 2015 | By Howard Gensler
FROM A hidden spot on a far-off rooftop, "American Sniper" blew away expectations and every film in its way this past weekend, taking in a record-setting (for January) $90 million at the box office. The Kevin Hart - Josh Gad comedy, "The Wedding Ringer," finished a distant second with $21 million. Next up was "Paddington" ($19.3 million), "Taken 3" (dropping 64 percent to $14.1 million) and "Selma" (dropping only 26.6 percent to $8.3 million, with a likely strong day of business today)
NEWS
August 15, 2014 | BY DAVID GAMBACORTA, Daily News Staff Writer gambacd@phillynews.com, 215-854-5994
COUNTLESS PEOPLE have hoisted signs and chanted slogans at the top of their lungs on the streets of Philadelphia in recent years. Their causes have varied - covering everything from income inequality to environmental concerns to overseas conflicts - but protesters in this city have all shared one thing in common: They didn't have to gag on billowing plumes of tear gas, or dodge rubber bullets that were fired by cops clad in military gear. Much of the world has watched in horror as protesters and reporters in the small town of Ferguson, Mo., have been met with those nightmarish conditions in the wake of a recent police-involved shooting that claimed the life of an unarmed, college-bound teen named Michael Brown.
NEWS
June 16, 2013 | By Esam Mohamed, Associated Press
TRIPOLI, Libya - Rooftop snipers and knife-wielding assailants killed six soldiers in Libya's eastern city of Benghazi early Saturday, officials said, in the largest attack on the country's new security forces to date. The brazen overnight assault by hundreds of plain-clothed gunmen on security installations forced soldiers to withdraw from some of their bases. In one case, soldiers fled out the back door of the First Infantry Brigade's headquarters in Benghazi as assailants stormed the main gate, torching the building and two military vehicles.
NEWS
February 11, 2013
Dakota Meyer is a U.S. Marine veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan, and a recipient of the Medal of Honor What was Ron Paul thinking? I read the news coverage surrounding Paul's callous and inane comments about the death of a decorated Navy SEAL at the hands of another veteran with utter and complete disbelief. I knew Chris Kyle; he was a friend and brother of mine. What was Paul thinking? Kyle, a Navy veteran of Iraq and Afghanistan who received seven heroism awards by serving as a sniper in combat, saving hundreds of lives, is murdered at a gun range in Texas, and Paul says this by Tweet on Tuesday: "Chris Kyle's death seems to confirm that 'he who lives by the sword dies by the sword.' Treating PTSD at a firing range doesn't make sense.
NEWS
February 4, 2013
STEPHENVILLE, TEXAS - An Iraq War veteran charged with murdering former Navy SEAL sniper Chris Kyle and a friend turned a gun on the pair while they were at a Texas shooting range, authorities said Sunday. Eddie Ray Routh, of Lancaster, Texas, was arraigned early Sunday in the deaths of Kyle and Chad Littlefield, 35. They were killed at a shooting range at Rough Creek Lodge, about 50 miles southwest of Fort Worth. Police said Littlefield was Kyle's neighbor and "workout buddy. " Capt.
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