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Snoopy

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NEWS
December 19, 1999 | By Barrie Maguire
I met Charles Schulz in 1984 at his California studio while I was on a business trip for Hallmark Cards. He was a quiet and gracious host, more at ease with the artists in our group than with the business types. He showed us around the place, talked to us about his routine and his work, shared his secret pride in his lettering, his contentment with his life. After an hour or so, he excused himself so he could go off and work on that day's strip. I got chills at the thought that a brand new Peanuts was about to be created.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We'll always have Snoopy. Despite the imminent and much-mourned end of the Peanuts comic strip, local and national animal experts said yesterday that Charles Schulz has left a legacy: A snoop doggy-dog named Snoopy. "Snoopy is forever," said Julie Fulkerson of the National Beagle Club. "There was an old Peanuts strip in which Snoopy says something like, 'No one should live without benefit of beagle.' Well, we will not have to go through life without benefit of beagles and Snoopy.
NEWS
December 28, 1988 | By Doreen Carvajal, Inquirer Staff Writer
It is a bleak afternoon like so many before, and the din from the cokemongers' chorus is rising in the raw chill of Percy Street. "Yellow!" they roar, chanting the drug's brand name like Little Leaguers needling a batter. "Yelluh, yelluh, yelluh, yeLLLLUUUUHHHHH!" The sole competition comes from a boyish man with marble-blue eyes, a battered aviator jacket and a rolling voice edged with an unforgettable Cincinnati twang: "Yo! SNOOPY. " Recruiting Christians in the name of a flop-eared cartoon beagle is what Pastor Tony McCreary does for a living along North Philadelphia's streets of broken sidwalks and wounded lives.
NEWS
April 15, 1990 | By Lita Solis-Cohen, Special to The Inquirer
It may be difficult to believe, but Charlie Brown, Snoopy, Woodstock, Lucy, Schroeder and Pigpen - the whole Peanuts comic strip gang - are antique and collectible. An Official Price Guide to Peanuts Collectibles exists, as does a thriving collectors club that publishes a newsletter. And there also have been two Beagle Fests, as Peanuts collectors' conventions are called. The Beagle Fests are held in Santa Rosa, Calif., where Charles M. Schulz draws the comic strip. Schulz didn't attend the first Beagle Fest, but he showed up at the second one last summer and signed autographs.
BUSINESS
October 5, 1993 | Rose DeWolf, Daily News Staff Writer
They call it the Tree of Life. Philadelphia-based Cigna Corp. has adopted a new logo - one that features a tree trunk and multiple leaves. Cigna's old logo, or corporate signature, featured the word "Cigna," underlined, in a blue box. Not friendly enough, Cigna's senior marketers said. The Travelers, a rival insurer, is known by a picture of a sheltering umbrella. Prudential's logo includes a piece of a rocky cliff. Allstate's name is always topped by a pair of "good hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beloved gang of the Peanuts comic strip and its creator will be honored May 17 when the U.S. Postal Service issues a commemorative that is certain to be popular with the public. The Postal Service has ordered a printing of 125 million stamps, far exceeding the usual 90 million or fewer for commemoratives. The design features Snoopy as that adventurous World War I flying ace. The goggled beagle is the only one pictured on the stamp, but he, his master, Charlie Brown, and buddies Lucy and Linus are depicted on the margins of the sheet.
NEWS
October 28, 1990 | By Wanda Motley, Inquirer Staff Writer
Lourene Nevels, a psychologist and professor at St. Joseph's University, finds truth in the humor of comic strips, especially when it comes to how the sexes communicate with each other. She cites a Peanuts strip in which Lucy tells Snoopy in the first few frames that they need to communicate to be good tennis doubles partners. Snoopy proceeds to communicate by yelling "mine" for just about every ball, until Lucy is pushed so far off the tennis court that she lands in a garbage can. The next ball comes, and Snoopy yells "yours.
BUSINESS
August 10, 1988 | By Marc Meltzer, Daily News Staff Writer
Consumers who bought a high-priced, designer telephone - maybe a Mickey Mouse or Snoopy model - from Bell of Pennsylvania between 1975 and 1981 stand to get refunds of as much as $50 under an agreement announced yesterday. The agreement, involving the defunct Design Line telephones, settles a 1984 case brought before the Public Utility Commission by Philadelphia consumer activist Max Weiner and the Consumer Education and Protective Association International Inc., which he founded.
NEWS
December 15, 1999 | By Jennifer Weiner, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The man who gave the world Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, Schroeder and round-headed Everykid Charlie Brown is calling it quits. Yesterday, Charles Schulz, creator and sole proprietor of the Peanuts comic strip, announced his retirement. "I think we have to say that he's sad about it," Schulz's wife, Jean, told the Associated Press. The announcement was not totally unexpected: Schulz, 77, was diagnosed with colon cancer last month, and recently underwent surgery. Still, fellow cartoonists and fans were stunned by the news.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emergency, emergency: The wind was kicking up and blowing the tablecloths off the tables in the booths at Saturday's May Fair in Collingswood. Why someone called Gerard "Jerry" Chambers, 62, with this problem is unknown - he likes to joke that even though he's the chairman of the festival, Mayor James Maley heads the weather committee. Still, Chambers specializes in problem-solving, with a particular talent for the mundane. "Tell them to roll up duct tape and just put the tablecloth on the tape," Chambers advised.
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REAL_ESTATE
December 29, 2013 | By Sally Friedman, For The Inquirer
An almost universal first reaction to entering David Abers and Richard Loatman's home is amazement, tinged with sensory overload. Their house, on a street in Trenton's Mill Hill section reminiscent of Society Hill, overflows with charm and intriguing architectural details. With nutcrackers, too. It all began innocently, as so many collections do. An aunt and uncle temporarily living in Germany sent Abers, their stateside nephew, a traditional wooden-soldier nutcracker as a Christmas present when he was about 12. "It happened that they had become friendly with Mark Spitz, the Olympian, and he actually guided them to the place they found my present," Abers remembers, "so that definitely gave it even more allure.
NEWS
May 27, 2013 | By Jane M. Von Bergen, Inquirer Staff Writer
Emergency, emergency: The wind was kicking up and blowing the tablecloths off the tables in the booths at Saturday's May Fair in Collingswood. Why someone called Gerard "Jerry" Chambers, 62, with this problem is unknown - he likes to joke that even though he's the chairman of the festival, Mayor James Maley heads the weather committee. Still, Chambers specializes in problem-solving, with a particular talent for the mundane. "Tell them to roll up duct tape and just put the tablecloth on the tape," Chambers advised.
NEWS
December 26, 2011
At 6-foot-5, David N. Pincus' height may have been the first thing people noticed about him, but his soaring heart is what they will remember. Pincus, 85, of Wynnewood, died last week of leukemia after a life of sharing his success with the world. The retired chairman of Pincus Bros.-Maxwell, a family-owned Philadelphia clothing manufacturer, Pincus used his fortune to care for suffering children and donate art works to area museums. Moved forever by a 1984 trip to Ethiopia during which a starving child died in his arms, Pincus traveled the world to bring relief to suffering children.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 20, 2010 | By Billy O'Keefe, McCLATCHY-TRIBUNE
Snoopy Flying Ace For Xbox 360 via Xbox Live Arcade From: Smart Bomb Interactive ESRB Rating: Everyone 10+ (violence) Price: $10 Fans of the Peanuts comic strip should find nothing surprising about Snoopy Flying Ace's single-player campaign, which finds Snoopy living out his dream as a World War I flying ace in pursuit of the devious Red Baron. What might be surprising is just how deep that campaign goes. Ace's compromise between arcade- and simulation-flavored controls feels perfectly right - not so loose as to make flying the planes a mindless cakewalk, but neither stiff nor needlessly complicated enough to keep casual dogfighting-game fans from enjoying themselves just as much.
NEWS
May 20, 2002 | By Sandy Bauers INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Everyone wants to know right off. So, no, female arm wrestlers are not what Mary Izzi laughingly refers to as "big giant women" who brawl at bars. Not for the most part anyway. Of course, there was the woman at a recent Allentown competition who told Izzi she worked in municipal maintenance and had spent the previous week stacking manhole covers. "I knew then I was going to lose," Izzi said with a grin. "I thought, 'OK, you can beat me. Just don't hurt me.' " But here are Izzi and Sue Fischer, both petite things who are friendly and laugh easily and live in houses decorated with lace and flowers and are, first and foremost, moms to their kids.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2001 | By Dominic Sama INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
The beloved gang of the Peanuts comic strip and its creator will be honored May 17 when the U.S. Postal Service issues a commemorative that is certain to be popular with the public. The Postal Service has ordered a printing of 125 million stamps, far exceeding the usual 90 million or fewer for commemoratives. The design features Snoopy as that adventurous World War I flying ace. The goggled beagle is the only one pictured on the stamp, but he, his master, Charlie Brown, and buddies Lucy and Linus are depicted on the margins of the sheet.
NEWS
June 14, 2000 | by Leon Taylor, Daily News Staff Writer
Elijah "Reedy" Reed, a retired longshoreman and colorful neighborhood character who owned a string of Buicks and a string of dogs named Snoopy, died of kidney failure Friday. He was 79 and lived in North Philadelphia for 52 years. Reed was a longshoreman for more than 35 years before retiring on disability in the late 1980s. During that time, he served two terms as a union delegate for Local 1234. Born in Sumpter, S.C., Reed was educated in Philadelphia public schools and graduated from high school before joining the Army for a three-year hitch during World War II. After his honorable discharge, he returned to Philadelphia and ran his own business, Popular Coal Co., at 10th and Mellon streets, for four years before settling in on his job at the docks.
NEWS
February 14, 2000 | By Karen Heller, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Peanuts creator Charles Schulz, the most beloved and successful cartoonist of the 20th century, died of colon cancer Saturday at his home in Santa Rosa, Calif., hours after his final strip appeared in early editions of yesterday's paper. As the artist always intended, Peanuts ended with him. Mr. Schulz, who was 77, began celebrating the comic strip's golden anniversary last year. He died in his sleep with his wife, Jeannie, by his side. He was diagnosed with the cancer following abdominal surgery in November, during which he suffered a series of strokes that left his speech and vision severely impaired.
NEWS
December 19, 1999 | By Barrie Maguire
I met Charles Schulz in 1984 at his California studio while I was on a business trip for Hallmark Cards. He was a quiet and gracious host, more at ease with the artists in our group than with the business types. He showed us around the place, talked to us about his routine and his work, shared his secret pride in his lettering, his contentment with his life. After an hour or so, he excused himself so he could go off and work on that day's strip. I got chills at the thought that a brand new Peanuts was about to be created.
NEWS
December 16, 1999 | By Marc Schogol, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
We'll always have Snoopy. Despite the imminent and much-mourned end of the Peanuts comic strip, local and national animal experts said yesterday that Charles Schulz has left a legacy: A snoop doggy-dog named Snoopy. "Snoopy is forever," said Julie Fulkerson of the National Beagle Club. "There was an old Peanuts strip in which Snoopy says something like, 'No one should live without benefit of beagle.' Well, we will not have to go through life without benefit of beagles and Snoopy.
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