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Snow Emergency

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NEWS
January 23, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE DREADED polar vortex hit Philadelphia again yesterday morning - earlier than expected - and resulted in school closures today, massive flight cancellations and a snow emergency that's in effect until noon. All Philadelphia district and Archdiocesan schools are closed today. Early-childhood and after-school programs run by the district also will be shuttered. For more information on school closures, call the district's information hotline at 215-400-INFO (4636) or log on to philasd.org.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | By Acel Moore
Even in Alaska, where I served an Army hitch, a 30-inch snowfall is a serious matter. People can disappear into drifts and die. In Philadelphia, a city that often seems ill-prepared to deal with a three-inch snowfall, a storm of such magnitude can be a catastrophe. And no less fatal. Already, the Blizzard of '96 has claimed several lives - in two cases, they were elderly women who went in search of food. This is why I'm disappointed with Mayor Rendell's cavalier treatment of rowhouse residents who remain snowbound, their streets unplowed.
NEWS
February 9, 1995 | By Amy S. Rosenberg, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Now they tell us. Five days after the biggest snowstorm since the blizzard of 1993, city officials gathered in the cold yesterday in the 1500 block of Walnut Street to detail an action plan for snow emergencies. They called it the "speedy relief" policy. Not speedy enough, probably, for some residents, especially the ones still fighting their way through city side streets. Actually, the snow emergency plan would do nothing for the secondary and tertiary roads. It would, however, require people to move their cars from all streets declared snow emergency routes - a total of 110 miles of roadway throughout the city.
SPORTS
December 29, 2001 | THE INQUIRER STAFF
The Wings will not play the Buffalo Bandits at the HSBC Arena tonight in a National Lacrosse League game due to the snow emergency in the city. The game will be rescheduled at a later date. The Buffalo area has received more than four feet of snow this week with more forecast for this weekend. The Wings, who last played in Rochester on Dec. 15 against the Knighthawks, will not play again until Jan. 12, when they visit the New York Saints. After that, the Wings will raise their 2001 NLL championship banner when they host the Saints in the Wings' 2001-2002 regular-season home opener at the First Union Center on Jan. 18.
NEWS
November 18, 1994 | by Mark McDonald, Daily News Staff Writer
Streets Commissioner Lawrence Moy told City Council yesterday a snow emergency route plan with aggressive towing would save the city thousands of dollars and open up key streets after major storms. Moy said one attempt to clear part of North Broad Street two days after a major storm last winter cost the city $50,000. "If we had a snow emergency route system in effect, we could have been in on day one and cleared the streets curb to curb," Moy said. The administration proposal, contained in a bill introduced by Councilman Daniel McElhatton, calls for creating a key 110-mile road network where motorists face $150 fines plus storage fees if they fail to heed a two-to- three- hour warning to remove their cars.
NEWS
January 27, 1994 | By Lacy McCrary, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Parking was part of the problem yesterday as snow piled up on suburban streets. Several towns in the area declared snow emergencies, meaning that residents could not park their vehicles on streets designated as snow-emergency routes. Many suburban communities have snow-emergency ordinances, which allow officials to prohibit parking on such streets or to limit parking to one side to allow snowplows to get through. The idea is to permit plowing from curb to curb on those routes.
NEWS
February 4, 1996 | FROM INQUIRER WIRE SERVICES
Hours behind schedule but still packing a punch, snow arrived in Philadelphia on Friday night, covering streets and pushing the city into action. With 6 to 10 inches predicted, officials declared a snow emergency, effective at midnight. That meant that any car parked along a snow-emergency route might be towed. Indeed, the city wasted no time. Ten minutes after midnight, tow trucks were rumbling along Broad Street. In December, after years of inaction, the city cleared the street of vehicles after a snowfall, catching residents by surprise and putting a dent in their pocketbooks.
NEWS
December 9, 1994 | By Wanda Motley, INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Preparing for Mother Nature's wily ways, City Council yesterday approved a new snow-emergency system that Rendell administration officials said would get the city's major arteries plowed quickly. Vehicles parked on designated routes would have to be moved within two hours after an emergency was declared or face towing. Owners would have to pay $150 to retrieve a towed vehicle. Administration officials have said that the Streets Department would be able to clear major streets from curb to curb without having to plow around parked cars.
NEWS
October 27, 1988 | By Charlotte Kidd, Special to The Inquirer
The Upper Moreland Township Board of Commissioners has voted to endorse a land-development plan from Evergreen Realty for a shopping center along County Line Road. According to the plan, the center, which would be built between Shoemaker and Davisville Roads, would have five major tenants and five retail specialty stores. The center would have 265,000 square feet. The plan was approved by the Zoning Hearing Board in September. Commissioners told residents that the board's engineering committee would examine the plans more closely in an open meeting to be held after the developer decides the details.
NEWS
January 14, 1996 | By Eric Ringham
Five inches of snow fell on Minneapolis one day last week, and from the time the first flake fell, I could almost hear the plows. Five inches isn't much by Minneapolis standards, but it's enough to trigger a snow emergency, the closest thing we have to martial law. A snow emergency lasts three days. On Day 1, the city plows what it calls "snow emergency routes," on Day Two, it attacks the odd-numbered sides of residential streets, and on Day Three, it clears the opposite, even-numbered sides.
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NEWS
March 6, 2015 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Hundreds of Thursday flights were canceled and towns declared emergencies in advance of snowfall likely to be the signature event of a tenacious late-winter spell that has iced the region with record cold and nuisance storms. "It's been horrendous," Steve Lorenz, the Philadelphia Streets Department chief engineer, said Wednesday as he was preparing his crews to do battle yet again, this time with up to eight inches of snow possible by day's end. "In the last month, it feels like it's every other day," he said, adding that winter was making him a stranger in his household.
NEWS
January 28, 2015 | By Chris Hepp, Inquirer Staff Writer
Sam Phillips was excited as a schoolgirl with a snow day. In her case, the glow in her eyes came from the prospect of spending the night in the bowels of the Philadelphia Fire Department's headquarters on Spring Garden Street. If she were lucky, she might even catch a few hours of sleep on her office floor. "This is the part of the job I really enjoy," said Phillips, director of the city's Office of Emergency Management (OEM). "This is where you get to test your concepts, to test your plans.
NEWS
February 17, 2014 | BY JENNY DeHUFF, Daily News Staff Writer dehuffj@phillynews.com, 215-854-5218
PHILADELPHIA'S fifth snowiest winter in history has kept the Streets Department busy and it won't stop this weekend, Mayor Nutter said yesterday. The season's storms have broken a 130-year-old record for the most 6-inch-plus snowfalls. The snowfall tally so far is 54.8 inches. The snow emergency declared at 8 p.m. Wednesday was lifted at 2 p.m. yesterday. In the meantime, 363 cars were towed from snow-emergency routes so plows could clean up. And more snow is on the way. The forecast called for snow early today, mixed with rain in the afternoon before changing back into snow at nighttime.
NEWS
February 14, 2014 | BY SEAN COLLINS WALSH, Daily News Staff Writer walshSE@phillynews.com, 215-854-4172
FOR THE SECOND day in a row, Mayor Nutter closed city offices today as Winter Storm Pax continued to pummel the region overnight. The School District of Philadelphia, Archdiocesan schools and Philadelphia courts are also closed today. By last night, the storm had dropped more than 10 inches on Philadelphia and was expected to add additional layers of snow overnight, Nutter said. Last night, the National Weather Service forecasted an accumulation of two to four inches overnight in Philadelphia.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
The snow-related break for Philadelphia School District students ends Thursday morning: The district announced schools and offices will be open. Schools were closed Wednesday as the region dug out from a winter storm that dumped up to 14 inches of snow in the Philadelaphia region. And while the kids had a snow day, it was dangerously cold with a high not better than 15. Wind chills at daybreak were 17 below zero. The 13.5 inches measured officially was one of the 10 biggest snowfalls in Philadelphia in records dating to 1884.
NEWS
January 24, 2014 | By Anthony R. Wood, Bob Warner, and Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writers
Dangerous cold gripped the region Wednesday as Philadelphia and neighboring counties dug their way out of the remnants of a record winter storm, and officials said the harsh weather played a part in three deaths. Little relief is in sight. Subfreezing temperatures are expected to continue into next week, with only a brief respite Saturday. A wintry pattern could persist for the next two to three weeks, the National Weather Service said. A touch of snow is possible Thursday and Saturday, and perhaps something more substantial early next week, forecasters said.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | BY REGINA MEDINA, Daily News Staff Writer medinar@phillynews.com, 215-854-5985
THE DREADED polar vortex hit Philadelphia again yesterday morning - earlier than expected - and resulted in school closures today, massive flight cancellations and a snow emergency that's in effect until noon. All Philadelphia district and Archdiocesan schools are closed today. Early-childhood and after-school programs run by the district also will be shuttered. For more information on school closures, call the district's information hotline at 215-400-INFO (4636) or log on to philasd.org.
NEWS
January 23, 2014 | By Joseph A. Gambardello, Inquirer Staff Writer
Residents, road crews and anyone who ventures outside are confronting bitter cold-temperatures as the area digs out from a record- winter storm that dumped a up to 15 inches of snow in the Philadelphia region. Schools were closed, roadways are being cleared, and mass transit was struggling to return to normality. At least two deaths were attributed to the weather. In Ridley Township, Delaware County, an 89-year-old man in the Folsom section and an 93-year-old woman in the Secane section of the township were both found outside Wednesday morning, police said.
NEWS
January 20, 2012 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
SEATTLE - A monster Pacific Northwest storm coated the Seattle area in a thick layer of ice yesterday and brought much of the state to a standstill, sending hundreds of cars spinning out of control, temporarily shutting down the airport and knocking down so many trees that members of the Washington State Patrol brought chain saws to work. Oregon experienced torrential rain that swept away a car from a grocery store parking lot, killing a mother and her 1-year-old son. East of Seattle, a man was killed by a falling tree as he was backing an all-terrain vehicle out of a backyard shed, authorities said.
NEWS
September 4, 2011 | By Kia Gregory, Inquirer Staff Writer
As Hurricane Irene barreled her way up the coast, MaryAnn Tierney stood outside her South Philadelphia home Thursday night unrolling blue tarp. She duct-taped the shield over the new rocking chairs out front and over the crack in the porch. She soon caught her neighbor's attention, prompting him to come over. "Is it supposed to rain?" he asked, blissfully ignorant of impending Irene. Was it ever. Soon, others followed the example provided by Tierney - at age 34 already somewhat of a disaster guru - in preparing for a storm that would leave thousands without power, flood homes and roads, and cause 46 deaths in 13 states.
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