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Snow Removal

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NEWS
February 12, 1987 | By Russell Cooke, Inquirer Staff Writer
The death of a boy struck by a SEPTA bus that skidded through a North Philadelphia intersection on Tuesday has renewed criticism of the city's snow- removal efforts, adding intensity to a controversy that flared when a snowstorm paralyzed the city Jan. 22. To its critics, the city's snow-fighting program is a poorly managed, slow reacting apparatus that falls short of providing one of city government's fundamental services. City officials, however, insist that they have put together an effective program to fight snow.
NEWS
January 29, 1987 | By Theresa Conroy, Special to The Inquirer
Don't blame Mother Nature for the general havoc on the roads last Thursday. Instead, blame those who panicked during the snowstorm. At least, that's the way several municipal officials saw it this week, as they evaluated their snow-removal efforts and tallied up the financial damage from the storm that dumped up to 12 inches of snow on their suburban communities during a 12-hour period. The second snowfall that fell Sunday night and Monday morning was cleaned up fairly quickly compared with Thursday's storm, municipal officials said.
NEWS
February 1, 1987 | By Vanessa Herron, Inquirer Staff Writer
With two storms past and one expected, snow was the topic of the day for the Downingtown Borough Council. At a work session Wednesday night, council members said residents had been calling the borough hall and complaining on a local radio program about ice and snow on their streets and on busy Route 30. Council President William J. Whiteman said that the borough had done a "fine job" removing snow but that one big obstacle stood in the...
NEWS
September 11, 1988 | By Gloria A. Hoffner, Special to The Inquirer
On a cool, crisp evening signaling the start of fall weather, Aldan Borough Council members turned their thoughts to snow removal. The members plan to accept bids at Wednesday's meeting for 1988-89 snow removal. This Wednesday, the members talked about ways to cut the winter costs. "I feel we should incorporate the cost of loading salt onto the trucks into the bid," said Councilman Joseph A. McCollian. "Last year, the hour spent loading the truck was billed the same as an hour spent plowing the streets.
NEWS
February 8, 1987 | By David Lieber, Inquirer Staff Writer
Upper Darby Mayor James J. Ward said he was dissatisfied with the removal of snow from township streets after the two recent snowstorms. The mayor voiced his displeasure after a Drexel Hill resident, Joan Young, upbraided Upper Darby officials at a Township Council meeting Wednesday. Young, of the 4000 block of Dayton Road, criticized Upper Darby for "poor snow removal in almost the whole area of the township. " It was, she said, "a total disaster. " An ambulance that had come to her block to pick up a patient became stuck in the snow and neighbors had to push it, she said.
NEWS
February 17, 1987 | By KATHY SHEEHAN and BOB WARNER, Daily News Staff Writers
City union leaders acknowledged yesterday that the overtime bill for snow removal by city workers "seems a bit much," but they contended that the city is otherwise ill-equipped to deal with snow removal because of a shortage of personnel and equipment. The president and business agent of Local 403 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees said they had no immediate plans to fight a directive from Mayor Goode to curb overtime during snow emergencies. But John White, business agent of Local 403, said, "They are going to have a very big problem.
NEWS
August 12, 1990 | By Mary Anne Janco, Special to The Inquirer
You can't say Rose Valley Borough Council doesn't plan ahead. The temperature still may be in the 80s, but the council already has taken steps to prepare for the cold winter months by accepting a bid for snowplowing. "We don't drag our feet," joked Councilman William Schwarze when the agenda item came up Wednesday night. The council voted to accept the bid of Alex Pastuszek of Swarthmore for snow removal in the winter. He was the sole bidder. According to the bid, Pastuszek will charge the borough $69.50 an hour for a pickup truck with an 8-foot plow and $67 a hour for a pickup truck with a salt spreader.
NEWS
January 28, 2011 | By Claudia Vargas, Inquirer Staff Writer
In post-layoff Camden, officials rearranged personnel Thursday to get the city's 20 pieces of snow-removal equipment out to clean up the mess left by 2011's first major storm. About a foot of snow fell Wednesday and early Thursday in the region, and though the city said the number of the people who worked removing snow was not affected, residents had mixed reactions on the quality of the cleanup. More than 300 city employees were laid off last week, including 35 from the Public Works Department, which handles snow removal.
NEWS
February 19, 1987 | By Ginny Wiegand and Lini S. Kadaba, Inquirer Staff Writers
To Peter Black, a retired city employee who lives in Mayfair, the job of clearing Philadelphia streets after the Jan. 22 snowstorm "just wasn't done right. " Black, 58, who retired in July as a deputy fire chief, was believed to have been the only resident of the Northeast to attend a City Council hearing Tuesday on snow-removal problems resulting from the recent storm. "I was determined to come because certain sections of the city were completely ignored by the city," he said in an interview.
NEWS
February 5, 1987 | By S.E. Siebert, Special to The Inquirer
Whitpain Township has ended its tradition of shoveling snow to make a path for children who walk to school, but many parents say the township should reinstitute the practice of clearing the sidewalks when homeowners fail to do so. During its meeting Monday, the Board of Supervisors heard a similar request by David Martin of Vernon Road, who said January's mounds of snow needed to be cleared from sidewalks leading to the Stony Creek Elementary School...
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BUSINESS
February 1, 2016 | By Jonathan Takiff, Inquirer Technology Writer
Not many were cheering last weekend's winter storms. But Gizmo Guy was quietly mumbling "bring it on," so he could get his mitts around battery-powered outdoor gizmos that make snow removal easier and keep you warm while you're at it. Light lifting. Consumer Reports is right. Gas-powered snow blowers are more effective than electric-powered ones. The petro-fueled (gas with oil) units are bigger and brawnier. They dig deep, chomp hard, and throw heavy loads, skills beyond the ken of electric blowers that frolic best with eight inches or less of fluffy stuff.
NEWS
March 8, 2015 | By Laura McCrystal, Inquirer Staff Writer
The sun was shining on PPL Park on Friday morning as Bob Dylan's "Like a Rolling Stone" blasted through the speakers. But even the famous song could not drown out the chorus of scraping shovels and beeping trucks that echoed through the stadium. Workers in parkas, hats, and gloves moved through each row, using orange shovels to scrape snow and ice from seats and stairways. A dump truck carried snow across the field and out of the stadium before returning for another load. The snowstorm that hit the Philadelphia region Thursday arrived just two days before the Union's Major League Soccer home opener against the Colorado Rapids.
NEWS
September 25, 2014 | By Brielle Urciuoli, Inquirer Staff Writer
Joseph M. Prota took the initiative once a year to round up clothes and boots that he and his coworkers at the Delaware River Port Authority no longer used and give them to the homeless people who often camped out under the Walt Whitman Bridge. Almost every day, especially during the colder months, he would also bring them food, such as soup, chocolate, coffee, and hot chocolate. "We're going to keep that tradition up in honor of Joe," a colleague, Frank Natanni, said Tuesday. "He was an all-around great guy Mr. Prota, 59, of Williamstown, died Thursday, Sept.
NEWS
March 7, 2013 | By Matt Katz, Inquirer Trenton Bureau
Why has New Jersey spent more to plow snow this winter than it did two years ago, when three times as much fell on the state? The state Department of Transportation attributed the increase - $22 million as of Tuesday, compared with $21.2 million for the entire snow season two winters ago - to more statewide storms, which require its plows to be dispersed more widely. Plus, this year the Christie administration increased by 25 percent the amount it pays contractors to plow, department spokesman Joe Dee said.
NEWS
March 1, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, Inquirer Staff Writers
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines, and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis nor his peers or the best minds of meteorology imagined that that storm would be the worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, borough manager in Doylestown, where tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
February 29, 2012 | By Anthony R. Wood and Edward Colimore, INQUIRER STAFF WRITERS
For John Davis, it was a dream winter - over by Halloween. That would have been just after a freak Oct. 29 storm of heavy, wet snow collapsed tree limbs, ripped down power lines and set Davis and his public-works colleagues throughout the region to worrying: Here we go again. But after back-to-back brutal winters, neither Davis - nor his peers nor the best minds of meteorology - imagined that storm would be the very worst of the "winter" of 2011-12. "Ordinarily you spend the winter plowing or getting ready for plowing," said Davis, public-works chief in Doylestown, Bucks County, where the tight streets and well-used sidewalks make snow removal an adventure.
NEWS
February 13, 2012 | By Art Carey, Inquirer Columnist
Winter has been so mild, with so many seductive previews of spring, that it seems churlish to suggest we may still see some snow before the first robins and dandelions. Over the years, we've had some major dumps in February and March. Punxsutawney Phil, the prognosticating groundhog, saw his shadow earlier this month, and you know what that means. More convincing still: Accu-Tony, the paper's in-house weather sage, told me not to write off Old Man Winter yet. Thus the timing of today's topic: two nifty human-powered snow-removal devices guaranteed to do the job quickly and efficiently while giving you a dandy workout.
NEWS
December 23, 2011 | By Bill Reed, Inquirer Staff Writer
Though many Bucks County towns, including Bristol, Langhorne, and Yardley Boroughs, are holding the line on property taxes for 2012, Newtown Borough is raising its tax rate by 50 percent. The increase - Newtown's first in 16 years - amounts to an extra $126 for the owner of property assessed at the borough average of $42,000, raising the bill to $378. But the impact on the total property-tax bill, including about $5,300 in school and county levies, "is more like 2 to 3 percent," Councilman Gerard O'Malley said this week.
NEWS
March 29, 2011 | By Larry King, Inquirer Staff Writer
A Bucks County man who pulled a gun on a snowblower operator who had buried his car in an apartment parking lot was sentenced today to serve three months in prison. Eddie Lee Simmons Jr., 26, a recent transplant from North Carolina who had excelled in college and had no criminal record, "snapped" when he looked out of his Bensalem window Jan. 12 to see his 2004 Mazda disappearing under a mountain of snow, his lawyer said. "He completely overreacted to an ugly situation," defense attorney Craig Penglase said after the hearing in Bucks County Court.
NEWS
February 28, 2011 | By Anthony R. Wood, Inquirer Staff Writer
Back-to-back profoundly snowy winters perhaps could have come at a worse time, but right now the region's municipal managers can't think of one. With tax revenues down and budgets under attack, they say that yet another disruptive winter was about as welcome as a major car-repair bill after getting a pay cut. "It's been a nerve-racking year," said Tom Micozzie, mayor of Upper Darby Township. Stunned by two seasons that have deposited a total of more than 10 feet of snow on parts of the region, some local officials are even wondering whether this is the future of winter.
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