CollectionsSocial Change
IN THE NEWS

Social Change

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriet Jane Green, 73, of Philadelphia, who worked behind the scenes to bring about social change by connecting her vast array of friends and acquaintances, died Friday, July 18, of multiple myeloma at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Green stopped all medical treatment July 10, telling family members and her doctor that she wanted to "sail the ocean blue. " While Ms. Green's occupation was selling alternate energy sources to area homes, schools, and businesses, her passion was fighting for social and political change at the local level.
NEWS
April 17, 1988 | By Maura C. Ciccarelli, Special to The Inquirer
Margaret Hope Bacon's voice was failing her by 3:30 Wednesday afternoon. "I have a renewed respect for teachers and the long days they have," said Bacon - feminist, active member of the Central Philadelphia Friends Meeting and author of eight books - after a daylong visit with teachers and students at Abington Friends Upper School. Bacon also was getting over the flu, but her hoarse throat did not stop her from talking about her life's work - writing and speaking about Quakers and social change.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Saturday, a number of Philadelphia poets will unite to change the world, one poem at a time. Two poetry readings at different venues in the area will be part of the international 100 Thousand Poets for Change movement. From 2 to 5 p.m. at the Green Line Cafe, 43d Street and Baltimore Avenue, the Moonstone Arts Center and poet Leonard Gontarek, in conjunction with Peace/Works, will host Three Dozen Poets for Change, a free event. And at 5 at the Brandywine Workshop, 728 S. Broad St., Larry Robin, founder of Moonstone, will collaborate with the Clef Club and Work for Progress in America on 100 Poets for Change, also free.
NEWS
February 16, 2003 | By Natalie Pompilio INQUIRER STAFF WRITER
Shira EtShalom is rarely without her knitting needles or her sense of social justice. Only 19, she's an accomplished knitter with countless scarves, sweaters and blankets to her credit. She's also fiercely antiwar, pro-workers' rights and fervent about making a positive difference in the world. And she thought it only natural to combine her passions. EtShalom formed "Sew What?! Radical Knitters" in September. About 30 members - ranging in age from 6 to 50 but with a core of 20-somethings - meet biweekly.
NEWS
October 20, 2002 | By Valerie Reed INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
The poetry of Christopher Bursk may expose his soul, but the clutter of his office is all heart. A picket sign supporting farm workers' rights wedged behind his desk; jars of bubble solution lining a shelf; student papers he can't bring himself to throw away filling bookcases - all crammed into his college office, which barely has space left for two chairs. Pee-wee Herman and Steve Urkel dolls, a Lamb Chop puppet and cherished toys from his children's past find a home between textbooks, a stack of 45-r.
NEWS
July 24, 1989 | By Huntly Collins, Inquirer Staff Writer
The assassination of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in April 1968 was a turning point for Colin Diver, a young, idealistic student who was just finishing his final year at Harvard Law School. Ranked near the top of his class of 550, Diver had accepted a lucrative job offer from a prestigious Washington law firm. But in the aftermath of Dr. King's death, he decided to take a lower-paying job as an aide to Boston Mayor Kevin White, who would give him an opportunity to work on some of urban America's most pressing social problems.
NEWS
January 18, 1999 | By Rachel Scheier, INQUIRER SUBURBAN STAFF
Horace Russell was born and raised in Jamaica, and his face is the color of a well-roasted coffee bean. Beryl Russell is from England and has a fair complexion. Forty years ago at Oxford University, they met, fell in love and married. Yesterday, the couple spent their afternoon celebrating the birthday, and remembering the legacy, of one of their heroes, because, as Beryl Russell put it, "we believe what we have in our relationship is what the world should have. " Hundreds were gathered in that spirit at Bryn Mawr College yesterday, people of all races, ages and political affiliations, for the annual celebration of the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. "It's a pity we only do it once a year," Beryl Russell added, saying that recognizing Dr. King's legacy of tolerance and social change is needed more than ever.
NEWS
December 12, 1986 | By Sara Solovitch, Inquirer Staff Writer (Inquirer staff writer Gerald Jordan contributed to this article.)
Bob Edgar: Methodist minister, U.S. congressman, and now visiting professor of political science at Swarthmore College. Edgar announced his new job yesterday at a Washington news conference, quipping that "the voters of Pennsylvania elected me to search for a new vocation. " An ardent liberal who lost his bid for a Senate seat in the November election, Edgar said he would become the Eugene M. Lang Professor of Social Change at Swarthmore upon his departure from Congress in January.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
  KATLYN GRASSO, 20, a Wharton School junior, is CEO and founder of GenHERation, an online leadership portal for high school girls. GenHERation provides girls with an opportunity to work with national corporations and nonprofits to become catalysts for social change. Grasso has raised about $25,000 from various Wharton grants and venture funds to start up GenHERation. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for GenHERation? A: I've always been passionate about helping girls achieve personally and professionally.
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Paper Paging Through History By Mark Kurlansky W.W. Norton. 416 pp. $27.95. Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mark Kurlansky has created a niche writing about things that we take for granted. Cod , his briny and brainy "biography of the fish that changed the world," won a James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing in 1999. He has written about salt and oysters and frozen food, all with a flair that can make the mundane mesmerizing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
July 18, 2016 | By Valerie Russ, Staff Writer
WHOEVER THOUGHT that urban farming was a way to demonstrate that black lives matter - just as much as everyone else's? The youth who started Life Do Grow Farm in North Philadelphia thought so. They say "the farm," as they call it, is about more than just growing food. It's about community building and changing the neighborhood surrounding the farm on 11th Street near Dakota, a few blocks north of Temple University. "Going to these protests [such as for Black Lives Matter]
NEWS
June 27, 2016
Paper Paging Through History By Mark Kurlansky W.W. Norton. 416 pp. $27.95. Reviewed by Michael D. Schaffer Mark Kurlansky has created a niche writing about things that we take for granted. Cod , his briny and brainy "biography of the fish that changed the world," won a James Beard Award for Excellence in Food Writing in 1999. He has written about salt and oysters and frozen food, all with a flair that can make the mundane mesmerizing.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2015 | By Natalie Pompilio, Inquirer Staff Writer
Philadelphia artists Billy and Steven Dufala are known for their unusual creations made from unusual, mostly recycled, materials. Like the 14 tricycles made out of repurposed toilets for a race that was part of the 2005 Fringe Festival, and the cardboard tank they rolled through the city one afternoon in 2004. (That tank is not to be confused with their ice cream truck tank, via which they served treats in 2006.) Their project for October's Open Source series will see them using aluminum to make functional pieces, like numbers to indicate home addresses.
NEWS
September 27, 2014 | By Sofiya Ballin, Inquirer Staff Writer
On Saturday, a number of Philadelphia poets will unite to change the world, one poem at a time. Two poetry readings at different venues in the area will be part of the international 100 Thousand Poets for Change movement. From 2 to 5 p.m. at the Green Line Cafe, 43d Street and Baltimore Avenue, the Moonstone Arts Center and poet Leonard Gontarek, in conjunction with Peace/Works, will host Three Dozen Poets for Change, a free event. And at 5 at the Brandywine Workshop, 728 S. Broad St., Larry Robin, founder of Moonstone, will collaborate with the Clef Club and Work for Progress in America on 100 Poets for Change, also free.
NEWS
July 22, 2014 | By Bonnie L. Cook, Inquirer Staff Writer
Harriet Jane Green, 73, of Philadelphia, who worked behind the scenes to bring about social change by connecting her vast array of friends and acquaintances, died Friday, July 18, of multiple myeloma at Penn Hospice at Rittenhouse. Ms. Green stopped all medical treatment July 10, telling family members and her doctor that she wanted to "sail the ocean blue. " While Ms. Green's occupation was selling alternate energy sources to area homes, schools, and businesses, her passion was fighting for social and political change at the local level.
NEWS
May 1, 2014
  KATLYN GRASSO, 20, a Wharton School junior, is CEO and founder of GenHERation, an online leadership portal for high school girls. GenHERation provides girls with an opportunity to work with national corporations and nonprofits to become catalysts for social change. Grasso has raised about $25,000 from various Wharton grants and venture funds to start up GenHERation. Q: How'd you come up with the idea for GenHERation? A: I've always been passionate about helping girls achieve personally and professionally.
NEWS
December 9, 2012 | By Joe Trinacria, Inquirer Staff Writer
Jon Kest, 57, a social activist and founder of the Philadelphia chapter of the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now (ACORN), died Wednesday, Dec. 5, of liver cancer at his home in Brooklyn, N.Y. Born in New York City, Mr. Kest graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 1977 with a bachelor's degree in history. He remained in Philadelphia after his graduation and became an advocate for the less fortunate. Through his work with ACORN, in conjunction with the Kensington Joint Action Council, Mr. Kest led an effort to transfer the titles of abandoned houses to low-income families in the early 1980s.
SPORTS
December 8, 2011
I GET IT. During a season when the Eagles have failed so miserably to meet their on-field expectations, it's hard for fans to get excited about their continued success off the field. When Philadelphia has been waiting for 51 years for the Eagles to bring home another NFL championship, the organization winning an international competition for commitment to community service and social change isn't going to inspire a parade down Broad Street. The award that Eagles Youth Partnership executive director Sarah Martinez-Helfman received for the organization yesterday in South Africa as the Beyond Sport Team of the Year has little resemblance to the coveted Vince Lombardi Trophy as Super Bowl champion.
NEWS
October 9, 2011 | By Charles Babington, Associated Press
SPENCER, Iowa - Republican presidential candidate Rick Perry stepped more deeply into the tricky issue of Social Security on Saturday, saying he was open to raising the age for receiving benefits and limiting them for upper-income people. The Texas governor told an Iowa audience "it makes sense" to increase the eligibility age because Americans are living longer. The age for full benefits is now 65 to 67, depending on one's date of birth. He also said it may be time to limit payments for higher-income people, known as means-testing.
1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | Next »
|
|
|
|
|